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Duolab123
28-Jan-2017, 21:34
I picked up a nice clean Type 2, Zone VI enlarger, 8x10, with the VC cold light head and a Zone VI compensating timer. The timer took me some time to figure out. I just picked this stuff up today. Actually there are two identical enlargers, just 1 has the 8x10 setup.
I'm trying to find a manual for the timer if anyone can help me
My current 8x10 enlarger is a beautiful old Elwood, if you are using graded paper it's a darn nice, affordable rig.

I drove 180 miles round trip got both enlargers and some other bits for 200 bucks. I figured I can make it work if I can get used to the light source and the timer.

I need to get it setup and give it a go.

Any observations, advice, or a lead on the timer instructions would be appreciated.

Best Regards Mike

neil poulsen
29-Jan-2017, 01:41
The timer's really pretty self-explanatory. There are two connections between the head and the timer. There's a regular AC plug on the left side that powers he head. There's a second connection that plugs onto the top of the head with a funny plug that connects the timer to a sensor located inside the head. There's a third connection on top of the head that goes to wall AC power. This powers the heater inside the head, to help make it more stable.

Don't expect the "seconds" to be real time. They may be faster, or slower than real seconds. But, this isn't an impediment to printing. If you can get instructions, that's worth while. There is a certain set of steps to follow in powering the head. Wrong steps can potentially cause damage. (I forget exactly what this is.) If I can find my set of instructions, I can let you know.

Not so obvious, there's a recessed screw inside the timer that permits you to adjust the duration of the seconds.

Duolab123
29-Jan-2017, 08:01
The timer's really pretty self-explanatory. There are two connections between the head and the timer. There's a regular AC plug on the left side that powers he head. There's a second connection that plugs onto the top of the head with a funny plug that connects the timer to a sensor located inside the head. There's a third connection on top of the head that goes to wall AC power. This powers the heater inside the head, to help make it more stable.

Don't expect the "seconds" to be real time. They may be faster, or slower than real seconds. But, this isn't an impediment to printing. If you can get instructions, that's worth while. There is a certain set of steps to follow in powering the head. Wrong steps can potentially cause damage. (I forget exactly what this is.) If I can find my set of instructions, I can let you know.

Not so obvious, there's a recessed screw inside the timer that permits you to adjust the duration of the seconds.

Neil, Thanks, this helps, I played around with the stuff last night pretty cool. The timer, if it works the way it is supposed to, sounds like a great thing.

I currently print VC with a dichro 45s color head, I use yellow and magenta together (I'm trying to say constant neutral density) so can adjust contrast and keep the same time. I'm hoping some good Samaritan will find a copy of the timer instructions. I even looked at the Wayback Machine, couldn't find anything.

Sure would be nice if someone would give me a Heiland LED head for this :-)

Best, Mike

I've got to get the beasties out of my wife's car and down to my darkroom. They are a lot easier to move without the lead weights!

cowanw
29-Jan-2017, 08:32
There is a Zone vi group on APUG.
Here is how to do what you want to do
http://www.jbhphoto.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/vcclcaljbharlin1.pdf
I use the Split Grade system and so cannot give any other advice except to point out that "seconds" in green are longer than "seconds" in Blue, so that 10 seconds green and then 10 seconds blue exposure is not the same as 10 seconds green plus blue. (not even considering the dimming dial function.)

cowanw
29-Jan-2017, 13:57
By the way, you didn't mention if you had a Contrast Control box with the Compensating timer box.

Duolab123
29-Jan-2017, 15:33
By the way, you didn't mention if you had a Contrast Control box with the Compensating timer box.

Yes, contrast control, alphabet for soft and hard. Lamp intensity control, and focus all on one control box for the VC head. The timer just seems to be integrating Lux? beeps faster with more light slower with less light. I think everything is working right. I think this may be a neat set up. The glass less holder works great with nice ESTAR base Tri-X. Still haven't got it upright yet. I am hoping I can use for split printing, but just having a VC head puts me ahead of the Elwood.

I need to make a short table, about 20 inches high to set the baseboard on if I want to go full height in my darkroom.

Thanks for the help, Mike

Peter Lewin
29-Jan-2017, 20:51
Duolab: If you haven't already seen this, here is the contrast grade chart for the VC control box: http://www.bnimages.com/files/zonevicontrast.pdf

Tomorrow I will see if I can scan and post the instruction sheet for the Compensating Timer. I find the timer very useful when I change grades during printing. IOW, I usually make my test strips and first print at Grade 2 settings (unless the contact sheet tells me that the negative needs to be more or less contrasty than normal). But frequently I will see from the first print that I need to change the grade settings. The timer readjusts the nominal time so that despite the different light output of the new grade setting, the whites stay fixed at the same value as the first good print, and only the contrast changes with new settings.

One other "trick:" while the head has a built-in heater, I don't completely trust it to keep the tubes at operating temperature. So when I'm printing, once the print is in the fixer, I turn the enlarger back on in focus mode. That keeps the tubes at operating temperature. Before the next print, I put the enlarger back into exposure mode (turning off the tubes), put a fresh sheet of paper in the easel, and make the next print. That way the tubes are never cold during the print cycle.

Duolab123
29-Jan-2017, 21:37
Duolab: If you haven't already seen this, here is the contrast grade chart for the VC control box: http://www.bnimages.com/files/zonevicontrast.pdf

Tomorrow I will see if I can scan and post the instruction sheet for the Compensating Timer. I find the timer very useful when I change grades during printing. IOW, I usually make my test strips and first print at Grade 2 settings (unless the contact sheet tells me that the negative that it really needs to be more or less contrasty than normal). But frequently I will see from the first print that I need to change the grade settings. The timer readjusts the nominal time so that despite the different light output of the new grade setting, the whites stay fixed at the same value as the first good print, and only the contrast changes with new settings.

One other "trick:" while the head has a built-in heater, I don't completely trust it to keep the tubes at operating temperature. So when I'm printing, once the print is in the fixer, I turn the enlarger back on in focus mode. That keeps the tubes at operating temperature. Before the next print, I put the enlarger back into exposure mode (turning off the tubes), put a fresh sheet of paper in the easel, and make the next print. That way the tubes are never cold during the print cycle.

Good information. I think this method will be how I will start. The pre-heating is something I remember from 35 years back with an Aristo head I had. It too had a heater, but if I recall I would run a blank exposure before the real thing.
Right now for up to 4x5 I use a dichro head. I use combination of yellow and magenta for all contrast settings, this allows for same total filter density so I can keep exposure the same and adjust contrast as needed. I think with the compensating timer this will get me the same freedom, but now up to 8x10.
Thanks, this is very helpful.
Best Regards Mike.

Luis-F-S
30-Jan-2017, 07:58
One other "trick:" while the head has a built-in heater, I don't completely trust it to keep the tubes at operating temperature. So when I'm printing, once the print is in the fixer, I turn the enlarger back on in focus mode. That keeps the tubes at operating temperature. Before the next print, I put the enlarger back into exposure mode (turning off the tubes), put a fresh sheet of paper in the easel, and make the next print. That way the tubes are never cold during the print cycle.

You don't have to do that with the compensating timer. Try to save the bulbs and electronics.

geneg12
30-Jan-2017, 08:07
You don't have to do that with the compensating timer. Try to save the bulbs and electronics.

I'd like to see a photo of your new enlarger with the timer and cold head light.

Thanks,
Gene

Luis-F-S
30-Jan-2017, 08:49
I have an &x10 Devere not a Zone VI, but I did own two of them which I hated and sold; so I know how they work! For $200 though it's a steal!

cowanw
30-Jan-2017, 09:04
You don't have to do that with the compensating timer. Try to save the bulbs and electronics.

Besides which, if l leave it on focus the light switches off after a period of time automatically. Also Mike the idea of constant times and combined Blue and Green is contrary to Split printing ( broadly speaking)

Randy Moe
30-Jan-2017, 09:30
Maybe a DeVere is unique, but most tube electronics live longer if not switched on and off over shorter durations.

Ever notice how incandescent bulbs often burn out when the power switch is flipped on?

Same with tubes, they don't like the initial power surge on startup when ambient.

Some devices have slow start up to alleviate this age old problem. My old tube radios are turned on for 12 hours then turned off, as I don't trust them as I sleep.:)

Peter Lewin
30-Jan-2017, 09:46
Maybe a Durst is unique, but most tube electronics live longer if not switched on and off over shorter durations.

Ever notice how incandescent bulbs often burn out when the power switch is flipped on?

Same with tubes, they don't like the initial power surge on startup when ambient.

Some devices have slow start up to alleviate this age old problem. My old tube radios are turned on for 12 hours then turned off, as I don't trust them as I sleep.:)
Randy, I don't disagree with your comment, but it runs counter to the way Fred Picker (founder of ZoneVI) taught me how to print. His approach was that if you made your test strips with, say, 3 second intervals, and found that the 5th strip (15 seconds) was your starting point, you made the print with 5 3-second exposures (which he argued would be different from going to a 15 second print). Bottom line, you are intentionally using more short duration bursts. I stress that I am not arguing your point on the electronics and impact on lifespan of tubes, merely that the ZoneVI guru himself worked, and taught, a contradictory approach.

As for the need to leave the tubes on, or make pre-exposures before making a print, my experience is that something is often necessary, even with the ZoneVI heater and compensating timer. You can tell if the tubes are stabilized by watching the green light on the head during exposure. If the head is unstable, the light goes off. My experience taught me that if I didn't do something, I would sometimes (but unpredictably) see that the head was unstable (i.e. tubes had cooled too much) during the first one or two exposures (I print as Fred taught). The "Picker Approach" is to test: try using the head without any pre-exposure or pre-warming; if it stays stable, great. If not, you will have to adopt a strategy to ensure it is stable when you need it to be.

Peter Lewin
30-Jan-2017, 15:07
First, a general question, showing my ignorance of things electronic. I scanned the 2-page instructions for the Compensating Timer, so I have it in my Documents file as a .pdf. As far as I can tell, there is no way to make a .pdf available to the Forum so it can be archived if this question arises again?

In the meantime, if Duolab will PM me an email address, I will see if I can send you the .pdf as an attachment to an email.

Duolab123
30-Jan-2017, 18:47
Here are some Samsung phone pics.
160588160589

Duolab123
30-Jan-2017, 19:06
160590160591

The enlarger is about 5'7", In the prior picture you can see the smaller lead weight that is added for the 8x10 head. I'm going to need a pair of binoculars to stand up and focus. This unit will work but don't confuse it with a real 8x10 enlarger. It wiggles if you touch it, enough that, I get tired of waiting and steadied it to calm it down. It really needs fixed bracing from a wall.

Benefits, I carried it down into my basement by removing the lead counterweight, and the baseboard. And, I brought two of these home, in the back of my Wife's '07 Subaru wagon. It will work fine for my playing.

Randy, It's no Saltzman! I'm going to make a base should put the easel about 27" off the floor.
Best Regards, Mike

Duolab123
30-Jan-2017, 19:26
Besides which, if l leave it on focus the light switches off after a period of time automatically. Also Mike the idea of constant times and combined Blue and Green is contrary to Split printing ( broadly speaking)

I think I'm going to just try to print a couple prints using both tubes together just to get started. I have never done any split printing. I have always been afraid of jiggling the enlarger while adjusting the knobs. I use a Dichro head on a Beseler 4x5. If I can get where I can make a decent print straight, maybe I can work up the courage to try the split thing with this. I also have another Beseler with the Zone 6, 5x7 VC head (recent acquisition) that I can practice with some medium format negatives.

I cant imagine anyone using these Zone VI machines for anything other than large format.

Best Regards, Mike

Keith Pitman
30-Jan-2017, 20:07
A couple of notes:
1. Wall mounting the enlarger should make it very stable. I have two. Both are wall mounted.

2. Zone VI sold a focusing extension. If you didn't get one with either of your enlargers, you might want to fabricate one unless you have really long arms.

3. I don't use the extra weight in the 8x10 enlarger. You have to hang onto the head when moving it, but I found the additional weight dragged in the column.

Did you get all the instructions you needed? I have some printed materials on these enlargers that I can share if you let me know what you need.

Duolab123
30-Jan-2017, 20:26
I have an &x10 Devere not a Zone VI, but I did own two of them which I hated and sold; so I know how they work! For $200 though it's a steal!

It's clearly a real stretch to try to take a 4x5 enlarger and make it into a 8x10. Still it will work for me. 200 bucks. I really have no clue how I will focus as there are no extension shafts. Maybe I will get a knuckle and a 20 inch extension for a 1/4 inch ratchet :)
I would love a Devere. But explaining to my wife why I need a 1200 lb 10 foot tall enlarger that cost, even used, real money. It ain't gonna happen. There was a Devere dichro with all the light integrator boxes ,carriers, really nice, I think they wanted around 3500, again a steal for a nice example. Fortunately for me I didn't pounce or I would be living in our garden shed
Best Mike

Duolab123
30-Jan-2017, 20:40
A couple of notes:
1. Wall mounting the enlarger should make it very stable. I have two. Both are wall mounted.

2. Zone VI sold a focusing extension. If you didn't get one with either of your enlargers, you might want to fabricate one unless you have really long arms.

3. I don't use the extra weight in the 8x10 enlarger. You have to hang onto the head when moving it, but I found the additional weight dragged in the column.

Did you get all the instructions you needed? I have some printed materials on these enlargers that I can share if you let me know what you need.

I am going to run some sort of threaded rod or aluminum channel to the wall once I get it settled. I have instructions for the enlargers and vc heads. I'm still looking for the timer instructions. .
And yes I had a bit of trouble getting the little weight in, I will see how it goes. I think if I can get it stabilized it will be fine. In the mean time it's sitting on a vibration free concrete floor so I just need to go slow. I have to replace the foam that turned to goo. I have a pristine 240MM Rodagon that I am going to mount on a lens board that came with. Then I'm ready to get going.
Thanks to everyone for the help, Mike

Randy Moe
30-Jan-2017, 21:09
160590160591

The enlarger is about 5'7", In the prior picture you can see the smaller lead weight that is added for the 8x10 head. I'm going to need a pair of binoculars to stand up and focus. This unit will work but don't confuse it with a real 8x10 enlarger. It wiggles if you touch it, enough that, I get tired of waiting and steadied it to calm it down. It really needs fixed bracing from a wall.

Benefits, I carried it down into my basement by removing the lead counterweight, and the baseboard. And, I brought two of these home, in the back of my Wife's '07 Subaru wagon. It will work fine for my playing.

Randy, It's no Saltzman! I'm going to make a base should put the easel about 27" off the floor.
Best Regards, Mike

It can fatten up. Just add weight. The Saltzman has 140 lbs of lead for counterweight. It needs it to balance the 14" double condensors that I can no longer lift. The Fotar has massive added weight, bolted on everywhere it can. Like 200 lbs under the baseboard. The Beseler has cement in its base.

Richard Rau
31-Jan-2017, 02:49
Congrats on the new Zone Vl 8x10. I'm sure it will make printing tremendously easier. However, just to clarify, you most certainly can do split contrast printing with an 8x10 Elwood. I do it all the time with an Aristo head, as I'm sure others do as well. It's a beast to be sure, clunky, quirky, and is everything that anyone else has ever described about this close to 80 year old relic. Maybe someday, I'll build a VC LED head to replace the Aristo for the Elwood. But truth be known, if I had the oppurtunity to pick up a 8x10 Zone Vl enlarger to replace my old Elwood, to make life easier, I probably would.

Duolab123
31-Jan-2017, 06:05
Congrats on the new Zone Vl 8x10. I'm sure it will make printing tremendously easier. However, just to clarify, you most certainly can do split contrast printing with an 8x10 Elwood. I do it all the time with an Aristo head, as I'm sure others do as well. It's a beast to be sure, clunky, quirky, and is everything that anyone else has ever described about this close to 80 year old relic. Maybe someday, I'll build a VC LED head to replace the Aristo for the Elwood. But truth be known, if I had the oppurtunity to pick up a 8x10 Zone Vl enlarger to replace my old Elwood, to make life easier, I probably would.

Yes, the old Elwood is a great old beast. Mine has the beautiful silvered dome with 500 W Bulb. It's a great enlarger. I have 12 inch Ilex Paragon for it, nice !
Best Mike

Alan Curtis
31-Jan-2017, 07:31
I fabricated an extension arm for my Zone VI. Very easy with parts from Home Depot.
http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/showthread.php?97754-Zone-VI-Type-2-Variable-Contrast-Enlarger-any-advice-for-new-user/page9

cowanw
31-Jan-2017, 08:26
Regarding focusing, with my older eyes, I am using the magnasight and standing high enough to work the knobs on the left side. When I check with a grain focuser, I do a fine job with the magnasight.
With the boxes off on a small table to the side you don't touch the enlarger at all when doing split printing. I have never noticed shaking to be a problem. What can be a problem with some shortish lenses is distribution of illumination. Expose a blank sheet of paper with no negative and see if it develops evenly.
With split printing in blue green I have found I get out of thinking in grades pretty quick and think in terms of highlight and shadow effect separately

Duolab123
31-Jan-2017, 18:14
I fabricated an extension arm for my Zone VI. Very easy with parts from Home Depot.
http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/showthread.php?97754-Zone-VI-Type-2-Variable-Contrast-Enlarger-any-advice-for-new-user/page9

Alan, I have already observed your handy work. This is exactly what I am going to try when I get time. I had a brief vision of attaching a cordless screw driver to it. But then the vision of shredded bellows and stripped gears made me think better of it :confused:

I this this should work splendidly.

Thanks for the info.
Best Mike

Duolab123
31-Jan-2017, 18:26
Regarding focusing, with my older eyes, I am using the magnasight and standing high enough to work the knobs on the left side. When I check with a grain focuser, I do a fine job with the magnasight.
With the boxes off on a small table to the side you don't touch the enlarger at all when doing split printing. I have never noticed shaking to be a problem. What can be a problem with some shortish lenses is distribution of illumination. Expose a blank sheet of paper with no negative and see if it develops evenly.
With split printing in blue green I have found I get out of thinking in grades pretty quick and think in terms of highlight and shadow effect separately

I think I literally have every focusing contraption known to man. Paterson big and small (major and minor :rolleyes: ), the Omega Micro $200 job. The only thing I use anymore is thr humble Bestwell Magnasight! The damn film today has no grain! I make 11x14s from 6x9 Tmax 400, theres no grain to focus on! You would need a 40x scope. Even modern Tri-X in medium format is very fine grain. For 8x10 film I have some Tri-X and some Ilford Delta 100. Now I use the Bestwell and look for a sharp edge in the photo. Focus wide open then stop down two stops. That's my technique. I'm working more than I like right now (I'm supposed to be semi-retired) hopefully I will get back to my grueling 2 to 3 day weeks soon so I can get busy printing.
Thanks, Mike

Luis-F-S
31-Jan-2017, 18:31
My Durst SM-183 has a similar extension since the head is very high when all the way up! I found it the other day, it had fallen behind my darkroom sink. I had been looking for it trying to figure out where the heck I'd put it. I've now stored it carefully with the stored head where it should stay until my wife cleans up the storage closet! At least with my DeVere 5108 I don't have that problem! I think the Omega F has the most elegant solution, the extension arm telescopes to whatever length is needed! Jay I know you appreciate thad design! Luis

Duolab123
31-Jan-2017, 18:36
I fabricated an extension arm for my Zone VI. Very easy with parts from Home Depot.
http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/showthread.php?97754-Zone-VI-Type-2-Variable-Contrast-Enlarger-any-advice-for-new-user/page9

Alan, I see that you have your unit bolted to a wall. Did you put blocking in between the studs?

I'm debating what to do. The factory base looks like it will work in my vibration free basement.
Mike

Duolab123
31-Jan-2017, 18:49
[QUOTE=Luis-F-S;1375113]My Durst SM-183 has a similar extension since the head is very high when all the way up! I found it the other day, it had fallen behind my darkroom sink. I had been looking for it trying to figure out where the heck I'd put it. I've now stored it carefully with the stored head where it should stay until my wife cleans up the storage closet! At least with my DeVere 5108 I don't have that problem! I think the Omega F has the most elegant solution, the extension arm telescopes to whatever length is needed! Jay I know you appreciate thad design! Luis[/QUOTE
DeVere 5108, drool. I have been watching the DeVere Vulcan 10x10 on the auction site,

This important part of history is now in our showroom. The last one was made six years ago for the Algerian Army.

We purchased the unit from the Nova Scotia Government's Aerial Map facility. Possibly the last full wet aerial darkroom remaining in the world.

It was named after a war plane in the British Airforce.

The Vulcan stands over nine feet tall and weighs an imperial ton. It has a vacuum easel, perspective control bellows, 10x10 inch negative carrier capabilities down to 35mm film strips. Fully counter-weighted with automatic controls for adjusting height, distance etc.

Complete with bellows, carriers, lens boards, original manuals etc. And many more extra spare new parts.

Originally costing $175 000 US. Make an offer, trades welcome! Check out our work at (delete) We will ship worldwide in crates.

Imperial Ton COOL, Best Mike

Luis-F-S
31-Jan-2017, 19:40
The Vulcan is a fine enlarger, but I'll keep my 5108. It's all manual, so when it breaks, will be much easier to fix. Sort of why I got away from the Durst. Also 10" x 10" is sort of useless other than for aerial film. At least the DeVere 515 goes up to 11x14.

The 5108 Dichroic head is much easier to re-wire if necessary, and uses 4 very readily available Tungsten lamps. I've bought enough NOS bulbs on the auction site, so the bulbs will well outlast me. I love the focusing mechanism of the 5108, all manual like it's smaller brethren, the 504. The Vulcan uses automatic focusing as you noted, so much more stuff to break and have to maintain. The best thing about my 5108 is the fact that it had very little use, since it was bought new in 1994 and owned by a commercial photographer, who did his own printing, not by a commercial lab. Paid less than half of what I paid for my last Nikon D800! The 5108 also fits inside my darkroom with a 93" ceiling height, so a taller enlarger is not an option. As you can see, it's perfect as far as I'm concerned!

160660

Duolab123
31-Jan-2017, 20:36
The Vulcan is a fine enlarger, but I'll keep my 5108. It's all manual, so when it breaks, will be much easier to fix. Sort of why I got away from the Durst. Also 10" x 10" is sort of useless other than for aerial film. At least the DeVere 515 goes up to 11x14.

The 5108 Dichroic head is much easier to re-wire if necessary, and uses 4 very readily available Tungsten lamps. I've bought enough NOS bulbs on the auction site, so the bulbs will well outlast me. I love the focusing mechanism of the 5108, all manual like it's smaller brethren, the 504. The Vulcan uses automatic focusing as you noted, so much more stuff to break and have to maintain. The best thing about my 5108 is the fact that it had very little use, since it was bought new in 1994 and owned by a commercial photographer, who did his own printing, not by a commercial lab. Paid less than half of what I paid for my last Nikon D800! The 5108 also fits inside my darkroom with a 93" ceiling height, so a taller enlarger is not an option. As you can see, it's perfect as far as I'm concerned!

160660

Yes, that's what I'm always looking for. Most of the ones I see are all beat up from working 12 hours a day. I almost jumped on one about a year ago. It would have been 2 days driving renting a trailer etc. I still print color with my Beseler unit, mostly just for the idea of keeping it alive. One of my crazy cool magnificent machines are these two Kodak Rapid Color Processors vintage late 60's Still run like a champ. Both have temperature control. The model 16k on the right will turn out a 16x20 about every 4 minutes.
160661

Luis-F-S
1-Feb-2017, 06:53
Mine was a 28 Hours drive 2000 miles roundtrip, but well worth it! I was able to break it down and it easily fit inside a Honda SUV. Weigh is not an issue, two persons can handle it. L

Duolab123
1-Feb-2017, 20:51
Got the gooey foam cleaned up tonight. Just on the 8x10 vc head, the rest of the foam was fine. I'm really starting to warm up to this enlarger. It's perfectly counter balanced. I think I'm going to like the quiet crank elevation. I've been reading more about Paul Horowitz, the Harvard physicist and electronic engineer that designed the Zone 6 timers and stabilizer. He's a world famous guy. I think I'm going to like this outfit after all.
Best Regards Mike

Luis-F-S
2-Feb-2017, 07:04
Kind of like a mail order spouse-learn to like it!!

sepiareverb
3-Feb-2017, 12:29
I was always disappointed with the range of contrast from the Zone VI VC head, never managed more than about a single grade or grade and a half. I hacked my 810 Zone VI to accept a Keinzle VC head, could not be happier.

Luis-F-S
3-Feb-2017, 14:41
Whatever works for you. I'm sure Keinzle makes a fine head. Others have felt the same way you did about the Zone VI heads, but since I always printed around Gr 2-3, it was fine for me. I did not have the VC head long, mostly used the single tube head with graded papers, or filters just under the light source. I had an Aristo D57 head for the Durst with the Metrolux sensor installed, which worked fine for me with 45. Didn't use it much for 57. L

Duolab123
3-Feb-2017, 17:50
I'm pretty sure, I will be able to get plenty of good use out of my enlarger. I have put together a pretty nice darkroom over about 40 years. Mostly I wait until I find something used. I have 200 bucks in the Zone VI setup, I'm pretty sure I will be able to get all the contrast control I need out of it. 90% of what I print is pretty much straight prints between 1 1/2 and 2 1/2. I have always used an incident light meter and normal development. I use contrast filters when shooting Black and white if I'm shooting nature, which doesn't excite me. Black sky and billowing clouds , yeah I get it. I like to shoot portraits available light, streets, signs,buildings etc.
Here's my 100 dollar immaculate 240mm Rodagon. I had to rebore the lens board, the prior owner was using the flange as a retaining ring. Now it stays in place instead of sliding around.
160772

ic-racer
4-Feb-2017, 21:44
Nice that you have that lens. Like the Beseler 8x10 conversion, the short lens might be essential. The column does not have that much length for big enlargements, and small enlargements require lots of bellows draw with a 300mm lens. Have you had a chance to fire it up and check the projection? In terms of illumination, I'd be more concerned with evenness. My first 8x10 enlarger had an old Aristo 1414 (that is a 14" grid) and it did this. That is a test print with no negative in the carrier. I had to use a center filter to print with that!

160819

Duolab123
5-Feb-2017, 16:51
Here's the unit installed. No comments about the plumbing. It was a quick, cheap and works. Now to clean up. I can get a little over 20x24, on the 60 inch column. I can always go back to my good old Elwood with a 12 in Ilex Paragon. That baby has a silvered dome that's about 3 feet in diameter and will lay over for projection. Years ago a buddy and I made some 6 foot long panshots with that beast. Only problem is I don't have a 12 foot ceiling in my house :-)
160869

ic-racer
5-Feb-2017, 19:13
Looks good!

Duolab123
5-Feb-2017, 19:40
Nice that you have that lens. Like the Beseler 8x10 conversion, the short lens might be essential. The column does not have that much length for big enlargements, and small enlargements require lots of bellows draw with a 300mm lens. Have you had a chance to fire it up and check the projection? In terms of illumination, I'd be more concerned with evenness. My first 8x10 enlarger had an old Aristo 1414 (that is a 14" grid) and it did this. That is a test print with no negative in the carrier. I had to use a center filter to print with that!

160819

I think you had a glass carrier with dust in the corners ;) I gest! So most of my printing will be the old two stops up from wide open, so f/11. I know I should know this but aperture shouldn't effect light distribution should it? Darn thing is very bright on focus with both tubes on max. With the 240mm the bellows have just enough draw to make a reduction to about 6x8. Man I got to stop finding "bargains" Just my wife and I, she's an artist, 4 bedroom house full. We converted the family room into her studio.
I'm trying to find serious young people that will actually use things and giving them starter kits.
I will give it a test to see what the light distribution looks like. The "5x7" head you can see the falloff with your naked eye. For 4x5 I'm sure it would be fine.
Goal for this week is every night, try to clean and store, outside the darkroom. Need to get ready to print!
Best Regards, thanks for all the Info and help to All., Mike

neil poulsen
5-Feb-2017, 21:52
It's clearly a real stretch to try to take a 4x5 enlarger and make it into a 8x10. Still it will work for me. 200 bucks. I really have no clue how I will focus as there are no extension shafts. Maybe I will get a knuckle and a 20 inch extension for a 1/4 inch ratchet :)
I would love a Devere. But explaining to my wife why I need a 1200 lb 10 foot tall enlarger that cost, even used, real money. It ain't gonna happen. There was a Devere dichro with all the light integrator boxes ,carriers, really nice, I think they wanted around 3500, again a steal for a nice example. Fortunately for me I didn't pounce or I would be living in our garden shed
Best Mike

I have the same 8/10, 5x7 setup. My arms aren't that long, especially not that long. So, I picked up an Omega focus extension. Removing a focus know from an Omega D series enalrger reveals a rod. One end of the Omega extension fits onto that rod and can be tightened. The same is similarly true of the Zone VI 8x10, except the revealed rod is a different diameter. My idea was to have an adapter made to use the Omega extension on the Zone VI enlarger.

As it turned out, one showed up on EBay, so I sold the Omega extension. Zone VI extensions, on occasion, still show up on EBay. One did a few months ago. But, it's not something on which one can plan.

As for my Zone VI (Type II) enlarger, I like it a lot. For example, I like the oversized negative carriers that enable one to print the entire negative. So many of the negative carriers on other enlargers (Beseler, Omega, Durst, etc.) cut off quite a bit of the negative. I also like that fact that Zone Vi enlarger can be easily adjusted. I bought the Versalab Parallel kit from a member (herein), and it's worked well for me.

While I have both the VC heads (8x10, 5x7), I don't use them much. I have a Beseler 45s head that works well with a Beseler adapter that Zone VI (and Calumet) made for that purpose. I primarily print 4x5.

I made my own stand for the enlarger and anchored it at the top with a stabilizer kit.

It's good that you have the instructions for the head. I ran across mine and read a bit of it. I was a little surprised to learn that there's an incorrect turn-on sequence which can potentially damage the head. (Or something like that.)