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EdC
9-Jan-2017, 13:01
I've been going back and forth between 5x7 and 8x10 as a larger companion to my 4x5 monorail, particularly for alternative processes. I like the dimensions of the 5x7 format, (and smaller, lighter cameras) but am concerned that the negative size really won't show as well in comparison with the larger format of 8x10 for these processes. Wider choices in films for 8x10 are a consideration, also. As part of this, I've been trying to check in to some reasonably priced choices. One choice I've considered is the Kodak Master View, which would seem to offer some nice features and rigidity at a good price. Careful searching hasn't brought up much commentary on these, but what I have found seems to be favorable. I have seen the occasional Tachihara, but the last one that I've seen was a double extension. The triple extension doesn't pop up too often. Deardorffs seem to be most notable for being dearly priced, and a worry regarding the condition on what is being sold.

At any rate, other than finding a Toyo 810M series, any other possibilities that might be suggested?

Thanks,

Ed

Mark Sawyer
9-Jan-2017, 13:13
The KMV is a great choice, although finding those odd lens boards can be a challenge.. Also consider a Wehman, if you can find one.

ic-racer
9-Jan-2017, 13:32
I just checked the current price on the Shen-Hao FCL810-AC and it is about $3300 USD. I think mine was about $1800 a few years ago, so I'm not in touch with current prices. I usually buy used equipment, but that price was so good at the time. I was also looking at a Used and slightly damaged Canham for over $2000 at the time. Keep checking the for-sale section of this forum. See what comes up.

tgtaylor
9-Jan-2017, 13:39
Ed,

I've been shooting for alternative processes with a Toyo 810G and 810MII for several years now. About a year back I purchased a Toyo 5x7 reducing back for a non-alternative project and recently shot several 5x7 negatives with it for alternative processing. By not trimming away the over coats from the brush on 8x10 paper and dry mounting the print on 16x13 museum board I was pleasantly surprised with the result. Although the actual image area is not as large as 8x10 by mounting the full 8x10 sheet which includes the excess coating kind of makes up for smaller image size and tends to enhance the image by emphasizing the handmade quality:

http://spiritsofsilver.com/yahoo_site_admin/assets/images/El-Capitan-and-Merced.8131556_large.jpg

I am thinking about doing this with 8x10 negatives on 11x14 paper instead of trimming away the the rebate. Doing that will require going to a larger mat and frame but I do have a good 12x15 contact frame.

Thomas

Greg
9-Jan-2017, 13:41
Over the years I have had 3 Burke & James Commercial view cameras. These are wooden flat beds. Gray paint can be stripped to uncover beautiful hardwood (Maple I believe on the one I stripped) that can be easily stained the color of your choice. Owned two 8x10s and a 11x14. I always ended up selling them for more than I bought them for. Only problem I ever had was one of the pieces in the flatbed was cracked... was a very simple fix with Gorilla glue. In the late 1970s when I was at RIT, went for dozens of day hikes up gorges with camera, film holders, etc. in a backpack and carried my tripod over my shoulder. B&J also made a very simple wooden tripod that matches up great with their Commercial view cameras. Was surprised to see George Tice using same tripod in a video about him. In my opinion the B&J Commercial view camera is a whole lot more sturdier and robust than older wooden turn of the century cameras. This FORUM is a great place to get opinions of different cameras. Good Luck.

locutus
9-Jan-2017, 13:55
New the VDS 8x10 seems like good value.

Randy
9-Jan-2017, 13:56
Just a quick plug for 5X7 - though I no longer own one, I do have a 5X7 back for my 8x10. I do the occasional cyanotype from 5X7 negs - I really love how they look. Personally, I prefer how they look over my 8X10 cyanotypes, but I think that is because I prefer the dimensional ratio of the 5X7, not necessarily the size. I think I prefer either square format or the longer rectangle over what is produced by 4X5 or 8X10.

Corran
9-Jan-2017, 15:12
Pound-for-pound, I think the Wehman cameras are really a deal. Very lightweight, and one of the cheaper options on the second-hand market. Mr. Wehman even sent me a free part for my camera when I took a fall and broke the focus track.

Vaughn
9-Jan-2017, 15:27
Another vote for 5x7 -- it is a wonderful size hand-holding for viewing the print and very nice for walls with limited view distances (framed 11x14 or 12x16). And in alt photo work, going from 4x5 to 5x7 is not significantly more difficult...as the jump up to 8x10 can be.

I have a Zone VI 8x10. A good beast and I believe not expensive on the used market. Solid. Not light, but not extremely heavy. All the movements. Bellows do get a bit scrunched up trying to use short lenses (used a 159mm, but 210mm was not too bad) but easily can handle the 24" RD Artar...but I was on the last cog to focus on the moon with a 28" lens. Uses 5.5" sq lens boards - Sinar basically, I think. I am not easy on equipment -- I make them work. And so far, so good these past 20 years with it.

With the FujiW 300/5.6;

Fr. Mark
9-Jan-2017, 15:29
whole plate prints really nicely on 8x10 sized pieces of paper. Some of your 5x7 lenses probably cover WP nicely, too. Not what you asked but WP is a really nice size for contact prints. I go back and forth about 8x10 and 5x7. I have both, like both. Especially in pinhole, I like bigger negatives. I built a pinhole camera that holds 3 8x10's around an arc, super wide angle and weird distortion, but the 24x10 size is fun for sure and the middle sheet is not too weird.
Pinhole cameras can be built for next to nothing, too.

I built a beast of an 8x10 sort of like a tailboard camera and built around an enormous, fast projector lens. At the time I thought I was going to do wet plate or dags and would need an 18" f3.6. That lens weighs more than 2 or 3 4x5's... Go that route with some trepidation. I am somewhat stalled out on a 8x10 field camera restoration project. Bought it in pieces for $20 and have another $20 in brass hardware in it. It has an odd lensboard size and not a lot of bellows draw or movements and has 3 holders (non standard). Initially I'm going to equip it with an meniscus lens (close up lenses) and an iris someone gave me out that's out of a small theater spot light. Eventually, it may have a rapid rectilinear or something more modern with a shutter in the 20-30-40cm focal length. Need to make the bellows...that's the major stall right now. I've never made a tapered bellows, I made a huge straight one for the 1st 8x10 project. Very tedious. It will also need a "go hiking" tripod.

EdC
9-Jan-2017, 15:32
I like what TG has done with that 5x7 contact. Nice touch on that.

On the Wehman, I remember reading about those a very long time ago in View Camera, but have never seen one for sale. I suspect that there were never very many made during the relatively short time that the company was in business. Unfortunate, since it looked like a good design.

I would agree with Randy that I do like the aspect ratio of 5x7. The more rectangular format is appealing. If it were just a little bit larger, I'd like it even better. By the way, the caption to your signature photo is great!

In answer to Greg, I used to have a B&J 5x7 once upon a time. What I did not care about on that was lack of rigidity, at least on the one that I owned. When unfolding it, and screwing down the front track, I could not get that tight enough to avoid play. That being said, I was able to get some good exposures during the short time that I owned it. Nice contact prints.

At any rate, thanks for the commentary! This isn't done yet.

Ed

Corran
9-Jan-2017, 15:40
Wehmans pop up occasionally here in the classifieds. That's where I got mine - one of the few ultralight "swiss-cheese" ones.

Luis-F-S
9-Jan-2017, 15:53
For the price of some of these suggestions, you could have had a V8! At least a Deardorff won't loose value, just don't buy stupid at auction. There are currently a couple of very nice cameras offered at auction and they do come up on this and the other forum. Good luck! L

Vaughn
9-Jan-2017, 16:00
... By not trimming away the over coats from the brush on 8x10 paper and dry mounting the print on 16x13 museum board I was pleasantly surprised with the result...Thomas

It can work, but like any 'gimmick', it can work as long as the gimmick does not try to carry the image. Any presentation method should strengthen the work over-all.

I occasionally use the free-form methods, as in this salt print, but mostly I use the window mat to crop to the film rebate, or perhaps a touch larger...such in the platinum print below. Both 5x7.

Thom Bennett
9-Jan-2017, 16:11
As a former Deardorff owner, I say KMV. Set up, leveling, focusing are all quick and intuitive. Plus, it's metal. I got a Technika adapter board and have all my lenses in readily-available Technika boards. The main reasons I switched was that the KMV has front shift, more front rise, and very quick focusing compared to the Deardorff.

Jac@stafford.net
9-Jan-2017, 16:48
An original Century 1 is light, proven in the field.
.

Corran
9-Jan-2017, 16:55
I don't think you mentioned what the intended subjects are. For me as an avid hiker weight was the primary concern, which is why I ditched a Tachihara/Wista dbl. ext. 8x10 for the Wehman. I had been looking at a Chamonix but its weight was high too, despite my Chamonix 4x5 being wonderfully light. Deardorffs are really heavy too from my research, as was an old Kodak Century Universal I had. If you are okay with 10 lb + cameras for your intended shooting, then you've got plenty of options.

jp
9-Jan-2017, 17:05
How will the 8x10 be used and with what lenses?

There are many different 8x10 out there. I like my B&J 8x10 field camera. But I could be talked into a deardorff as they are still rugged but fold into a more compact shape for backpack transport. I rarely walk my B&J more than a mile and can just carry it by the strap. The KMV is nice rugged and compact but pretty heavy.

Greg
9-Jan-2017, 17:21
How will the 8x10 be used and with what lenses?

There are many different 8x10 out there. I like my B&J 8x10 field camera. But I could be talked into a deardorff as they are still rugged but fold into a more compact shape for backpack transport. I rarely walk my B&J more than a mile and can just carry it by the strap. The KMV is nice rugged and compact but pretty heavy.

If you find a Kodak Master View, make sure everything is in alignment. A friend bought one and later discovered that it must have been dropped and metal parts were bent. If it were a wooden view, cracked wood would have indicated this. His KMV, like all of them, was metal and looked to be fine but was way out of alignment. He tried to re-align the camera parts but never got it back to as it should have been from the factory.

Alan Gales
9-Jan-2017, 20:06
When I was looking at 8x10's a few years ago you could get a real nice used KMV, Deardorff or Wehman for close to the same price. I ended up buying a used Wehman and am very happy with it. Any of the three would make a fine camera but the Wehman is the lightest. I've been contacted twice from members who told me that if I ever wanted to sell mine they would be interested so if you see one for sale you might want to jump on it! :)

vdonovan
9-Jan-2017, 22:30
Svedovkys are reasonably priced and very solidly constructed:
http://svedovsky.com/cameras/8x10-camera/

I have the 8x10 and while I don't love it, I like it. It's quite compact, but can extend reallllly far. I don't like the mechanism for front swing and shift, and I miss having rear swing, but other than that it's a fine very portable 8x10.

Leigh
9-Jan-2017, 22:58
I have a real double-extension 8x10 Tachihara with a 5x7 reducing back that I love.
With bellows from 90mm to 550mm it will handle a wide range of lenses.
It has generous front and rear movements, including 120mm front rise.

This is a gorgeous camera, made from 300-year-old Japanese cherry.

At 10.3 pounds in a 12x12x4-inch package it's not all that large.

- Leigh

Tony Karnezis
9-Jan-2017, 23:56
As a former Deardorff owner, I say KMV. Set up, leveling, focusing are all quick and intuitive. Plus, it's metal. I got a Technika adapter board and have all my lenses in readily-available Technika boards. The main reasons I switched was that the KMV has front shift, more front rise, and very quick focusing compared to the Deardorff.

I second Thom's comments. I highly recommend the Kodak Master. In addition, I like the large knobs and much prefer the position of the fine focus on the side of the rear standard instead of at the center like on some cameras (e.g. Chamonix). Seems like a more natural position to me.

I also have a Technica board adapter for smaller lenses but mostly use full size lens boards. Michael Smith and Paula Chamlee made very nice boards a few years back. I would contact them if you can't find any. Alternatively you can make your own boards out of 1/16" aluminum stock and glue felt to the back for the light trap as one of the members on this forum does.

Luis-F-S
10-Jan-2017, 09:02
As a former Deardorff owner, I say KMV. Set up, leveling, focusing are all quick and intuitive. Plus, it's metal....
Thom, I know you prefer the KMV, but your Deardorff was very loose which is why I sent it off for a full restoration when I bought it. That being said, I have no experience with the KMV, so cannot comment on your assessment of that camera. Since I know you've done this a long time, and I respect your opinion, I'm sure the KMV is a very nice albeit heavy camera.

In the past, I have owned Wistas, Zone VI's, Wisners, Canhams and Deardorffs. While all have their strengths and quirks, I presently own 5 Deardorffs, so I must really like them. Two I bough new in 1987, the others I bought used in various states and had 2 of them restored. One V8 I think was unused and sat on someone's shelf for 40 years! A good thing about the Deardorffs is that since they were made in the thousands, they are readily available. With some careful shopping, you can usually find a camera in good shape that will fit your budget. Wehmans are supposed to be fine cameras, but made in very, very small numbers compared to the Dorffs.

As has been noted in this thread, there are quite a few choices in new and used 8x10 cameras. The only way the OP is going to make an intelligent decision is to go out and see or preferably try some. You can read specs till the cows come home, but they won't tell the whole story like using a camera will. If you reach out to LLF members in your area, I'm sure they'll gladly show you their cameras. Sort of like getting a mail order spouse in the old days, but that's a whole other story...............L

Will Whitaker
10-Jan-2017, 09:59
Don't buy anything too pretty else you won't want to use it.

In the end ya pays yer money and ya takes yer choice. Consider your budget and choose wisely. It pays to get something which you'll be able to sell later if you need and still be able to recover your basic investment. As to format, you can't go wrong with either 5x7 or 8x10. Your personal preference and aesthetics will guide you. It all costs money.

Len Middleton
10-Jan-2017, 11:09
EdC,

You have not indicated how you are looking at reproducing your images, other than your comment on alternative processes.

If you are looking at conventional B&W enlarging, finding a 5x7 enlarger will be considerably easier and take up considerably less room.

If you are looking at alternate processes, then digital negatives might make the differences in sizes moot.

I do not see those issues being addressed in this discussion.

Asking more questions than answering, but wondering whether the important questions have been asked and answered yet...

Good luck in your efforts,

Len

P.S. Another happy V8 owner...

David Lobato
10-Jan-2017, 11:21
My situation is similar to Will's post prior to this. A Deardorff was my main 8x10 for a long time while I was getting an old Conley into working condition. I bought a Toyo 810M from a forum member and it's my most used 8x10 now. The Deardorff sits unused because of its looseness which made it hard to lock down settings where I want them. The Conley turned out to be a sweet addition. It's by far the lightest of the three, and easiest to pack with a lens attached. It anchors my minimalist 8x10 kit, to go light and fast (relatively speaking). The Conley lacks full movements but it's fine outdoors and for portraits with a 12 inch Kodak Commercial Ektar.

The more you want, the more you will need to pay. But quite a bit of capability can be acquired with a simpler and less expensive 8x10.

Will Whitaker
10-Jan-2017, 11:34
My situation is similar to Will's post prior to this.

Sorry David. I thought I sounded like I was pontificating again and edited my post apparently as you were composing yours. :)

Thom Bennett
10-Jan-2017, 15:24
Luis, I'm sure that Deardorff was loose! I'd love to see it restored. One thing about the KMV weight; it's the about the same as the Deardorff.

Luis makes a great point about connecting with 8x10 owners in your area and actually handling as many 8x10 cameras as you can. That really is the only way to make an informed decision. I had seen chatter about KMV's and knew that Michael and Paula used them but until I handled one and realized it fit my needs did I decide to switch teams.


Thom, I know you prefer the KMV, but your Deardorff was very loose which is why I sent it off for a full restoration when I bought it. That being said, I have no experience with the KMV, so cannot comment on your assessment of that camera. Since I know you've done this a long time, and I respect your opinion, I'm sure the KMV is a very nice albeit heavy camera.

In the past, I have owned Wistas, Zone VI's, Wisners, Canhams and Deardorffs. While all have their strengths and quirks, I presently own 5 Deardorffs, so I must really like them. Two I bough new in 1987, the others I bought used in various states and had 2 of them restored. One V8 I think was unused and sat on someone's shelf for 40 years! A good thing about the Deardorffs is that since they were made in the thousands, they are readily available. With some careful shopping, you can usually find a camera in good shape that will fit your budget. Wehmans are supposed to be fine cameras, but made in very, very small numbers compared to the Dorffs.

As has been noted in this thread, there are quite a few choices in new and used 8x10 cameras. The only way the OP is going to make an intelligent decision is to go out and see or preferably try some. You can read specs till the cows come home, but they won't tell the whole story like using a camera will. If you reach out to LLF members in your area, I'm sure they'll gladly show you their cameras. Sort of like getting a mail order spouse in the old days, but that's a whole other story...............L

neil poulsen
10-Jan-2017, 15:38
A Kodak 2D can be a good camera that's reasonably light weight and reasonably priced. I had one for a while, but sold it. The bellows had a problem, in that, with any significant rise, a portion could intrude on the image, cutting off a strip of light onto the negative. Perhaps the bellows wasn't original, or too stiff.

EdC
10-Jan-2017, 15:40
Been pretty chaotic since yesterday, but do have a few minutes to reply right now.

First, thanks to everyone for their comments! Very helpful. Let me offer a few bits of information which might assist.

Intended usage
What I like to photograph would be landscapes and architectural, along with still life subjects. I wasn't planning on enlarging, figuring that contact prints would be sufficient. I hadn't thought of digital negatives, and really don't know much about them.

Looking at 8x10s would be nice, but there are no dealers in central Indiana that carry any appreciable stock of large format cameras, let alone 8x10. The most prominent camera shop remaining here is Roberts, and they have a very beat up Deardorff in need of full restoration, and had a KMV for roughly 30 minutes before it was sold. Without engaging in some lengthy auto travel to Chicago or elsewhere, I don't think it likely that I'm going to find much available, sad to say.

Checking the clock, I'll need to touch base later.

Thanks,

Ed

Len Middleton
10-Jan-2017, 17:37
EdC,

As I have an 8x10 and an 8x20, and been looking at alternative photo processes, but not yet taken the leap, so I have not yet done the digital negative process yet.

However, you will need to be able to generate a digital file (scanned LF negative or digital camera), potentially need to manipulate the contrast for the process (e.g. Photoshop, or other), then print the digital negative to the desire size of the final image.

I expect there are resources in our LF community with experience who can better advise you on the quality of output, ease, and critical aspects of the process. Might be a viable alternate solution...

Good luck,

Len

Luis-F-S
10-Jan-2017, 17:40
For architectural n still life get a 4x5 Sinar F2. No one does serious architectural on 810. Ok so now that you have all of our collective opinions so go get one of each and tell us which one you like best!

jp
10-Jan-2017, 19:11
The only place I've been able to try a real variety of 8x10 cameras have been at LF workshops. I've been to two of Tillman Crane's and everyone had different LF cameras. I didn't get to use all of them but got to use a few and check out the rest.

Luis-F-S
10-Jan-2017, 19:15
......about connecting with 8x10 owners in your area and actually handling as many 8x10 cameras as you can. That really is the only way to make an informed decision....

Kind of why you have to be careful with what you buy and what you pay for it. Chances are that you will likely want a different camera once you own one. If you buy it right, you can probably (hopefully) get your money back out of it. Sort of why I suggested looking at or preferably trying different cameras from other LFF members in the area or LF friends to see what you might want. I'll be in Terre Haute later this year (April) and can drag up a V8 with me to try if it will help, you can PM me if interested. The OP did say that there was a junker Dorff at Robert's Camera. Even a junker can give you a feel for a camera; does it feel right to you? The cameras I tried or owned before the Deardorffs never did!

EdC
11-Jan-2017, 14:20
Thanks, Luis!

The junker 'Dorff I mentioned is missing the entire back and ground glass, yet is still priced at almost $1,300.

Ed

Luis-F-S
11-Jan-2017, 14:46
Hard to use without a back!

Graham Patterson
11-Jan-2017, 16:36
I built myself a basic 8x10 to play with the format - I figure the holders will hold their value, and the lens is from my 5x4 kit. What I have to decide is if the logistics of the larger format will offset the work of taking a 5x4 original up to 8x10 for contact print purposes. If it turns out that the larger format will work alongside or replace the 5x4, fine. But I have to be aware of the expense of materials. I should know by the end of the first box of film!

Dan O'Farrell
12-Jan-2017, 20:10
"...I've been going back and forth between 5x7 and 8x10 as a larger companion to my 4x5 monorail, ..."
You're used to using a monorail, you may want to look at Cambo Legend. I'm pleased with mine.

premortho
13-Jan-2017, 09:49
I loved my Ansco Commercial view. Very rigid. 5X7. As my grandfather taught me, "4X5's look fine in a photo album, but if you want to hang a picture on a wall, 5X7 is the boss". My grandfather was an amateur photographer from the 1890's until he passed away in 1950. He also told me "A contact print is the best print". Needless to say, he never felt the need for an enlarger. The camera club guys used to call him "one exposure Eddie". If you take that to mean he spent a lot of time getting everything he wanted on the ground glass before he made an exposure......you wouldn't be wrong!

Serge S
13-Jan-2017, 13:46
I loved my Ansco Commercial view. Very rigid. 5X7. As my grandfather taught me, "4X5's look fine in a photo album, but if you want to hang a picture on a wall, 5X7 is the boss". My grandfather was an amateur photographer from the 1890's until he passed away in 1950. He also told me "A contact print is the best print". Needless to say, he never felt the need for an enlarger. The camera club guys used to call him "one exposure Eddie". If you take that to mean he spent a lot of time getting everything he wanted on the ground glass before he made an exposure......you wouldn't be wrong!

Film has improved since then :)

EdC
16-Jan-2017, 13:56
Just wanted to thank everyone for their contributions! It has been helpful. I've also had some folks check with me privately regarding cameras out there for sale. I do appreciate that. To clarify one or two things, when I referenced architectural, I was thinking of the sort of work seen from David Plowden, Frederick Evans, Walker Evans, etc. Simple perspective correction would be something that I would definitely use. I have an existing 4x5 monorail (Arca Swiss), but that won't do much for any sort of alternative process experimentation. From what I have seen so far, most of the 8x10s that I've seen for sale (Wisner, Wista, Toyo 810M, etc.) seem to run from $2,200 to $2,800 or so. I know of a couple of KMVs that would be available for $1,800 to $1,900 or so. There don't seem to be many 8x10s selling for less that would seem to offer good movements and decent rigidity. I'm not very knowledgable regarding some of those, like the Korona Commercial, etc. If anyone would like to comment on that, please do so. I have seen 8x10 monorails at very favorable prices, but the weight seems to get up there, and then we have the setup time, as well.

On the 5x7 vs 8x10 comparison, these are the points that I've come up with, in case this might help other newbies such as me:

1. 8x10 - much better film availability
2. 8x10 - likely would have the edge for contact printing and alternative processes
3. 8x10 - appears to have a more ready market, in the event that the camera needs to be sold
4. 5x7 - more pleasing aspect ratio (at least for me)
5. 5x7 - lighter and handier
6. 5x7 - have a Jobo processing tank that will work with this size film (it had been sitting on a shelf for over 15 years or so)
7. 5x7 - could use almost all of the existing lenses that I have for my 4x5 monorail (210, 120, 90, and 65mm)

If there are any misstatements on my part, comments are welcome.

At any rate, kudos to the participants on this website! The collective knowledge is a definite help!

Ed

Len Middleton
16-Jan-2017, 14:39
7. 5x7 - could use almost all of the existing lenses that I have for my 4x5 monorail (210, 120, 90, and 65mm)


For certain not the 65mm, and 90mm would depend upon the lens (Angulon no, S-A or Grandagon yes)

EdC
16-Jan-2017, 15:33
Good point, Len! I should have mentioned that the 120mm is a Schneider Super Angulon f/8, and the 90mm is a Nikon SW f/4.5. The 65mm is also a Nikon SW f/4.5 and very definitely wouldn't cover. (But it sure works well for 4x5 interiors in tight circumstances.) But, that would still give me 3 decent lenses for 5x7 otherwise.

Thanks,

Ed

EdC
3-Feb-2017, 07:45
As a postscript to the discussions here, I was able to locate a very nice Zone VI 8x10 from a fellow forum member at an attractive price. Thanks for all of the feedback!

Ed

MAubrey
3-Feb-2017, 09:06
Good point, Len! I should have mentioned that the 120mm is a Schneider Super Angulon f/8, and the 90mm is a Nikon SW f/4.5. The 65mm is also a Nikon SW f/4.5 and very definitely wouldn't cover. (But it sure works well for 4x5 interiors in tight circumstances.) But, that would still give me 3 decent lenses for 5x7 otherwise.

And the 90mm will give you the same angle of view on 5x7 as the 65mm does on 4x5, so you're really not loosing anything there!

Jim Noel
3-Feb-2017, 15:52
Film has improved since then :)

Film has improved, but a good contact print still surpasses a good enlargement.

John Kasaian
3-Feb-2017, 19:39
As a postscript to the discussions here, I was able to locate a very nice Zone VI 8x10 from a fellow forum member at an attractive price. Thanks for all of the feedback!

Ed
Congratulations!

Alan Gales
3-Feb-2017, 20:48
Congratulations, Ed. You are going to love composing your image on that big ground glass!

John Kasaian
5-Feb-2017, 14:27
Ed, what kind of glass are you going to hang on your Zone's snout?

Drew Bedo
9-Feb-2017, 07:01
If Alternate processes and contact printing are of interest to you . . .why rule out a ULF set up?

Doesn't have to be gargantuan; consider 11x14.

neil poulsen
9-Feb-2017, 22:41
For architectural n still life get a 4x5 Sinar F2. No one does serious architectural on 810. Ok so now that you have all of our collective opinions so go get one of each and tell us which one you like best!

Amen to this. Architecture can require super-wides, and super-wides for 8x10 can be super-expensive. I think of an 8x10 as being more for fine-art, Black and white images.

EdC
10-Feb-2017, 09:27
If Alternate processes and contact printing are of interest to you . . .why rule out a ULF set up?

Doesn't have to be gargantuan; consider 11x14.

Interesting that you should say this. I also picked up a nice F&S 7x17 from a fellow forum member. I have some plans for that camera this summer.

EdC
10-Feb-2017, 09:30
Amen to this. Architecture can require super-wides, and super-wides for 8x10 can be super-expensive. I think of an 8x10 as being more for fine-art, Black and white images.

Thanks, Neil! As mentioned earlier, my concern was to ensure that I had decent capability to correct converging verticals. Otherwise, I plan on doing fine art and still lifes with the 8x10. My job involves some pretty long hours, so I do not always have time to get out and about. I'm getting things ready for some still life projects that will fit the time available, so that I can at least take SOME photos.

Ed

EdC
10-Feb-2017, 10:23
Ed, what kind of glass are you going to hang on your Zone's snout?

I only have two lenses (for now). I have a Goerz Dagor 10 3/4in., and a Schneider Symmar 360mm. The last one is a bit of a beast in size. But when compared with the 355mm Claron, surprisingly is not THAT much heavier. It helps that it had a very favorable price on it, too. I picked up that one so that I could also use it with a 7x17, since it offered a bit more coverage in that format than the Claron, from the sources that I checked. I was planning on getting a 16 1/2in. Artar or something similar to go with both cameras, but that is not an immediate need.

FWIW,

Ed

Luis-F-S
10-Feb-2017, 10:31
Not sure how well the 16 1/2 will cover 7x17. You might want to try for a 19" Artar. Also more common.
Just realized that the FS doesn't have enough bellows for a 19!

John Kasaian
10-Feb-2017, 10:58
IMHO value depends on condition and what you get out of it.
All the camera makes and models mentioned so far will do the job if they are in usable condition,
and if you take it out make photographs with it.

A camera you can't use, and dust collectors aren't the best value.

EdC
10-Feb-2017, 11:53
Not sure how well the 16 1/2 will cover 7x17. You might want to try for a 19" Artar. Also more common.
Just realized that the FS doesn't have enough bellows for a 19!

Absolutely correct. From what I've seen posted by other forum members, it's possible for them to focus (just barely) a 450mm at infinity. I did some quick math, and with a 16 1/2in lens, should be able to focus down to roughly 30 feet or so with one of those, and have a bit of coverage for some modest movements.

Thanks,

Ed

John Kasaian
10-Feb-2017, 16:44
I only have two lenses (for now). I have a Goerz Dagor 10 3/4in., and a Schneider Symmar 360mm. The last one is a bit of a beast in size. But when compared with the 355mm Claron, surprisingly is not THAT much heavier. It helps that it had a very favorable price on it, too. I picked up that one so that I could also use it with a 7x17, since it offered a bit more coverage in that format than the Claron, from the sources that I checked. I was planning on getting a 16 1/2in. Artar or something similar to go with both cameras, but that is not an immediate need.

FWIW,


Ed
Both the Symmar and the Dagor should be sweet lenses!

NCWetPlates
15-Mar-2017, 11:37
I've been impressed with the speed of setup of my new-to-me KVM. Quick to pack/unpack and holds most of my lenses except the bigger Gasc lens I have.

Love the fact that when closed, everything is "away". I do gaff tape a piece of plexi over the ground glass just me make me feel better when packing it.

boatboy343
16-Mar-2017, 03:46
bite the bullet and buy a deardorff v8 with front swings.
sturdy,always worth the money, heavy duty and a staple in lf field photography.

Luis-F-S
16-Mar-2017, 06:16
bite the bullet and buy a deardorff v8 with front swings.
sturdy,always worth the money, heavy duty and a staple in lf field photography.

+1! Sort of why I have 3 of them! There's a nice one on the LFF right now! L