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dodphotography
7-Jan-2017, 21:15
I've had the privilege of spending the last two years getting my MFA in Photography at MassART in Boston. There I've had the chance to get to know two of my photographic heroes, Abe Morell and Nick Nixon. Abe no longer shoots large format but Nixon continues to champion the 8x10 format. Through their connections I've had a chance to get a better, or more personal insight, to the work of people like Robert Adams, Lee Friedlander, and Frank Gohlke. They've become photographic heroes to me. It's been the marriage of cold reads of their work and their philosophy of picture making that brought me to admire their work.

Who are yours? Would love to hear everyone's insight and perhaps well all discover some new work in the process.


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John Kasaian
7-Jan-2017, 22:15
Any professional LF photographer who eats well is my hero :rolleyes:

dodphotography
7-Jan-2017, 22:17
Any professional LF photographer who eats well is my hero :rolleyes:

Wonder how small (or large) that list is!


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Mark Sampson
8-Jan-2017, 06:54
Larger than you think. Although I qualify for that list, I am a hero to no one but my dog (and, once in a while, my wife). My list of photographic heroes (I have a few) will follow when I have time to consider. But the sun is out now and I have pictures to make...

bob carnie
8-Jan-2017, 07:49
Brett Weston, August Sander , would top my list.

dodphotography
8-Jan-2017, 07:50
Brett Weston, August Sander , would top my list.

Sander is up there for me as well. I used to pass over his work for a long time as I only saw the work as reproductions in books... then I made a quick appointment at a local museum and they pulled some prints for me. Woof, they're great!


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h2oman
8-Jan-2017, 10:34
My current hero changes often, but the rotation has included David Plowden, Huntington Witherill, Michael Kenna, Ansel Adams, Brett Weston, Frederick Evans, WIlliam Clift, John Sanderson, Austin Granger,...

I'm not particularly cerebral about photography, so those are ones whose work I enjoy and whose visions and commitment to that vision seem unwavering. I've had little opportunity to interact in person with other photographers, so my choices are made based on their work alone.

Merg Ross
8-Jan-2017, 11:44
My list would include Albert Renger-Patzsch near the top.

http://www.getty.edu/art/collection/artists/1911/albert-renger-patzsch-german-1897-1966/

dodphotography
8-Jan-2017, 11:51
I think my experience in school has solidified my preference for artists who just work... a lot. Seems these days we are so conceptually heavy that we ultimately come up with these projects / series and make work specifically for that. Whereas my heroes like Robert Adams and Friedlander have a camera on them 24/7 and just make so much work, piecing concepts together at a later date.


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Vaughn
8-Jan-2017, 12:35
Geir and Kate Jordahl. Living heroes.

They are having a 40 year retrospective of their work at PhotoCentral in Hayward -- a photographic facility (gallery, darkrooms, digital space, classes, workshops, etc) they created in 1983. Show opening is on Saturday afternoon, January 28th. It is a bit of a drive south, but I am going to try to make it.

http://myemail.constantcontact.com/Jordahl-Photo-News-January.html?soid=1102093017145&aid=5tOx_EooPZU

My heroes because they have devoted their lives to photography, both in the creation of incredible work, and in the teaching of the craft and art of photography. They have inspired many people -- and they are good people themselves.

dodphotography
8-Jan-2017, 12:36
Geir and Kate Jordahl. Living heroes.

They are having a 40 year retrospective of their work at PhotoCentral in Hayward -- a photographic facility (gallery, darkrooms, digital space, classes, workshops, etc) they created in 1983. Show opening is on Saturday afternoon, January 28th. It is a bit of a drive south, but I am going to try to make it.

http://myemail.constantcontact.com/Jordahl-Photo-News-January.html?soid=1102093017145&aid=5tOx_EooPZU

My heroes because they have devoted their lives to photography, both in the creation of incredible work, and in the teaching of the craft and art of photography. They have inspired many people -- and they are good people themselves.

New names to me, thank you for sharing!

I'm glad I stared this thread.


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Two23
8-Jan-2017, 12:59
Mine are F. Jay Haynes, O.Winston Link, and I'll include Brassai because he did shoot a small plate camera. I really admire the early night photographers. Another LF photographer that doesn't get enough mention for what he accomplished is Solomon Butcher.


Kent in SD

bob carnie
8-Jan-2017, 13:34
Mine are F. Jay Haynes, O.Winston Link, and I'll include Brassai because he did shoot a small plate camera. I really admire the early night photographers. Another LF photographer that doesn't get enough mention for what he accomplished is Solomon Butcher.


Kent in SD

I too agree with Brassai , probably my favourite of all time, an incredible photographer.
I did not add him as I thought his film was not large format , but then of course it should have been small plate.

dodphotography
8-Jan-2017, 13:36
I too agree with Brassai , probably my favourite of all time, an incredible photographer.
I did not add him as I thought his film was not large format , but then of course it should have been small plate.

Understand it's a Large Forum forum but doesn't have to be limited to sheet film. I've seen amazing work in small formats... Robert Franks contact print sheets at Harvards FOGG museum ... whoa, killer.


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Cameron Cornell
8-Jan-2017, 16:32
Paul Strand
Gertrude Kasebier
Mike Disfarmer
Nadar
August Sander
Josef Sudek
Harry Callahan
Roger Fenton
Emmet Gowin
Thomas Struth
Lynn Davis
Robert Capa
and Robert Adams, for his writings and of course his photographs

I wish I could meet or could have met everyone on this list. There are at least a dozen more who should be on it.

Roland Barthes (Camera Lucida) and Susan Sontag (On Photography) are also on my list just for their writing on the subject.

Jim Noel
8-Jan-2017, 16:43
Al Weber was without doubt the most prolific teacher of photography in the second half of the 20th century. A list of those who studied under him is too long to attempt to list. He was the one to whom Ansel would turn and askto explain what he , ANsel, had just said. A down to earth man with fantastic knowledge,a love of nature, and an unsurpassed photographer.

baronvonaaron
8-Jan-2017, 17:08
I'm young and I'm not as well versed in the history as I'd like to be, but I try. A very clear influence on my LF style is Hiroshi Sugimoto and Michael Wesely (I also do very long exposures). I love Ansel's clear vision and dramatic presentation. Lori Nix and James Casebere I love for their fabricated worlds. Mike Brodie and Larry Clark for revealing real worlds that people try to ignore and sweep under the rug. it's a fairly contemporary list, and I know that their influences number some of those mentioned already in the thread.

Michael W
8-Jan-2017, 17:31
Eugene Atget - pursued a grand vision in relative obscurity.

jp
8-Jan-2017, 17:53
Eliot Porter - the whole intimate landscape thing is a big deal to me, and much of it is local to my area.
Clarence White - came out of nowhere as a self-made pictorialist heavy hitter and taught a who's who of early 20th century big name modernist photographers.
Aaron Siskind - his abstract styles speaks a great language.

Michael W
8-Jan-2017, 18:40
Linda Connor

Peter Lewin
8-Jan-2017, 18:51
William Clift, who was mentioned previously, and Sally Mann. Possibly Jock Sturges, not for his subject matter, but for his facility with an 8x10. And an honorable mention to Fred Picker, who had a huge impact on me both in terms of technique, and also by designing a lot of equipment I still use in my darkroom.

jnanian
8-Jan-2017, 19:16
nadar, man ray, the starn twins

Mark Sampson
8-Jan-2017, 19:16
Well, now I have some time again. Having given it a little thought, I will restrict my 'heroes' to those photographers who I've actually met or interacted with, and whose work might be familiar to readers. Otherwise the list would be much too long. So, without wordy explanations:
Charles Harbutt
Nathan Lyons
David Vestal
Paul Caponigro
Norman McGrath
Steve Rosenthal
David Plowden
Kirk Gittings
There are more that should do for now. Those who have influenced me, and those whose work I admire, are subjects for another thread.

jmooney
8-Jan-2017, 19:19
In no particular order:

-Eugene Atget
-Edouard Boubat
-Robert Dosineau
-O. Winston Link
-Josef Sudek
-Edward Weston
-Willy Ronis
-August Sander

Jim

mike rosenlof
9-Jan-2017, 08:09
Imogene Cunningham She was always exploring the world with her photography. Magnificent work in several areas.

DrTang
9-Jan-2017, 08:31
August Sander
Paul Strand
Alfred Cheney Johnston
Larry Clark
Sally Mann
Jock Sturges
Irving Penn
Diane Arbus

Robert Bowring
11-Jan-2017, 08:48
Mary Ellen Mark, Disfarmer, Walker Evans, Winogrand, Friedlander, Arbus, Robert Frank

LabRat
11-Jan-2017, 09:09
Don't forget to add Fredrick Evans, E.O. Hoppe, and Bernice Abbot to the list...

L.M. Nagy is important on my list...

Steve K

Eric Biggerstaff
11-Jan-2017, 10:22
Well,

Paul Caponigro
Brett Weston
William Clift
Michael Kenna
Alan Ross
George Tice

My list changes year to year

IanG
11-Jan-2017, 10:44
Not so much heroes but greatly respect and favourites in no particular order.

Kertesz
Thomas Joshua Cooper
John Blakemore
Olivia Parker
Minor White
Edward Weston
John Goto
John Davies

Ian

Andrew Tymon
11-Jan-2017, 10:46
Thomas Joshua Cooper
John Blakemore
Paul Hill
Keith Arnatt

David Lobato
11-Jan-2017, 11:01
Laura Gilpin
Eliot Porter
Alan Ross

IanG
11-Jan-2017, 11:20
Thomas Joshua Cooper
John Blakemore
Paul Hill
Keith Arnatt

I'd forgotten Paul Hill, but his influence (too strong a word) in many ways came from what I was told about his approach to the landscape before I'd seen his work, which made me feel I was going in the right direction. I've known Paul for over 25 years now. Keith Arnatt is an interesting artist he was a visiting lecturer when I hid my MA.

I missed Jem Southam from my list.

Ian

dpn
11-Jan-2017, 11:52
Adam Fuss
Richard Learoyd
Sally Mann
William Cheney Johnston
Ed Ross

John Jarosz
11-Jan-2017, 17:33
Porter
Siskind
Outerbridge
Plowden
Sinsabaugh

bgh
11-Jan-2017, 19:12
I'd have to go with Julius Shulman. Such a wonderful eye for buildings.

And, Jack Boucher, the long-time photographer for the HABS program. A wonderful, generous man and a heck of a knack for historic buildings.

Bruce

Eric Woodbury
11-Jan-2017, 19:14
Al Weber
Huntington Witherill
Brett Weston
Oliver Gagliani
Morley Baer
John Wimberley
(a lot of 'W' photographers)

Mark Darragh
12-Jan-2017, 03:26
Many great photographers have been mentioned, I would like to add the following who all shot or continue to shoot large format

Toshio Shibata
Shinzo Maeda
Robert Polidori
Peter Dombrovskis
Chris Bell

and two who have become friends and mentors
David Tatnall
Rob Blakers

Jim Jones
12-Jan-2017, 08:31
If being a hero involves intense effort and risk as well as results, not merely results, W. Eugene Smith.

HiHoSilver
12-Jan-2017, 09:37
'Heard the name, but didn't know the work of Eugene Smith. 'Still don't know his story, but if it impresses you, I'm betting its pretty impressive. His work on Magnum is certainly enough to impress.

mmerig
12-Jan-2017, 09:54
Stephen N. Leek

RedGreenBlue
12-Jan-2017, 18:49
Jacques Henri Lartigue may be my all-time favorite. Certainly though, there are others.

Ulophot
12-Jan-2017, 20:33
W. Eugene Smith
Lewis Hine
Strand
Adams
Walter Rosenblum

Andrew Tymon
14-Jan-2017, 12:36
I'd forgotten Paul Hill, but his influence (too strong a word) in many ways came from what I was told about his approach to the landscape before I'd seen his work, which made me feel I was going in the right direction. I've known Paul for over 25 years now. Keith Arnatt is an interesting artist he was a visiting lecturer when I hid my MA.

I missed Jem Southam from my list.

Ian

Looks like we were posting at the same time and share the same influences. I forgot John Davies and Jem Southam. Paul Hill gave a talk at Derby on his Light peak/Dark peak work. John Blakemore was teaching at that time and John Davies came and gave a masterclass, good times! We can't forget Raymond Moore can we?

prado333
15-Jan-2017, 13:56
IN no particular order
Richard Avedon
Irving Penn
Richard Misrach
Joel Sternfeld
Joel Meyerowitz
Nicholas Nixon
Emmet Gowin
ALec Soth
Paolo Pellegrin
JAmes Natchwey
Humberto Rivas
Carlos Canovas
Lee Friedlander
Todd Hido
Brigitte Lacombe
Alec Soth

archphotofisher
16-Jan-2017, 10:32
This question really got me thinking about my influences and how they affected my work, I also had to add my teachers.
Carleton Watkins
Eugene Atget
Paul Strand
Man Ray
Herbert Bayer
Irving Penn
Edward Weston
Bret Weston
Ansel Adams
Morley Baer
Bernard Freemesser
Phil Trager
George Tice
Richard Pare
William Cliff
Stephen Shore
Lewis Baltz
Teachers
Edward Halberg
Milton Halberstadt
Ezra Stoller
Peter Aaron
Michael Burns

Randy
16-Jan-2017, 10:51
This thread is going to cause me to spend hours looking up many photographers I have never heard of, and many I have heard of but forgotten about.

Two of my favorite locals:
Austin Granger and Ken Lee. I am confident that if I was flipping through a stack of 8X10s and came across a print by either one, I would immediately know who took the photograph - that's the way it is when I come across any of their images here on the forum - I know it's theirs before looking left - and I always love the image.

Alex Timmermans (http://www.alextimmermans.com/) is another who's images just leave such an impression on me. After viewing one of his images I feel like I have watched a full length motion picture.