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cinetango
29-Dec-2016, 22:41
Hello Large Format community,

I am an amateur photographer that has experience in 35mm and medium format. The large format bug bit me and now I am doing research on the subject. I am a bit overwhelm by the amount of cameras and prices for this format. I think that my budget for the camera and lens is around $400 USD.

I would like to take your guidance in regards to what should be my first LF camera and lenses. I am intrigue by LF camera movements and would like to use the camera mostly for portraits and landscapes. is there a newbies thread in the forum? I have not found it...

I am also looking for good excuses to tell my wife why I am going into LF photography and why I need the equipment; as she is already tired of ebay boxes for my other formats... :).

All the advice is greatly appreciated!!

Thanks,

Raul

John Kasaian
29-Dec-2016, 23:17
Welcome aboard!
You can certainly build a 4x5 kit with a Calumet 400 or Graphic View around your budget.
I suggest getting a copy of Steve Simmons Using The View Camera to start.

B.S.Kumar
29-Dec-2016, 23:30
Hi Raul,

Welcome. As a starting point, I suggest you read the articles on the home page http://www.largeformatphotography.info/ They will give you an idea of the different kinds of cameras, formats and lenses. On the forum, there are any number of threads extolling the virtues of this or that camera, metal vs. wooden, monorail vs. field, whether you should buy a cheap camera to start with or jump straight into a $3,000 investment and so on.

By the time you finish reading all this, you will learn that the most definite answer to any question is "maybe"!

Also, your 30 days will be up and you'll be able to see the Buy/Sell forum and decide what you want to buy.

Cheers,
Kumar

Leszek Vogt
30-Dec-2016, 00:59
Welcome, Raul. Sometimes you can find a nice rig on CL. If you're not going to use many cam adjustments and will want to hike with it, then a folder type rig would likely work best. Nothing is written in granite, some people use a 'rail camera for variety of terrains. Support is v. important as well.

If you are overwhelmed on cameras, then watch out for infinite (almost) variations on lenses. Fortunately, good portion of the equipment can be had for reasonable....and if you decide to graduate and move on to a different stratosphere, you can always sell things without getting dinged too much.

Good luck.

Les

Doremus Scudder
30-Dec-2016, 04:52
Hello Raul and welcome.

First piece of advice from me: don't jump too fast!

Take your time and find out what type of camera and what kind of lenses you might want relative to your shooting style and what and how you plan on photographing. Some considerations:

LF is not just one thing. There are many types of cameras and film formats.

As for format: For starting out, I'd recommend you stay with 4x5 if you're planning on enlarging/scanning. However, if you want to make contact prints and have the constitution for lugging around more weight, then you may want to explore 8x10 formats and larger. Be sure what you want to do here before moving on.

Camera types: There are monorail cameras, folding metal cameras with full movements, metal and wood folding press cameras with more limited movements but with rangefinders for hand-holding, and, finally, there are wooden folding cameras of various weights and capabilities. You need to explore and become familiar with the various types.

Lenses: Theoretically, any lens can be mounted and used on any view camera as long as it physically fits and there is enough bellows draw to focus with. LF lenses, unlike MF and 35mm systems don't have a lens mount. Instead, cameras are designed to take a lensboard, upon which the lens is mounted, usually by securing the threaded barrel of the lens/shutter with a retaining ring or flange. Lensboard sizes are specific to the particular camera you choose, but there are a few common sizes. Lenses themselves come in various focal lengths, 150-200mm being considered "normal" for the 4x5 format, 135mm semi-wide, 90mm wide and 75mm and shorter very wide. Moderately long lenses are 240-300mm; longer go up from 360mm to the extreme of around 600mm. Keep in mind that many cameras don't have the bellows draw to utilize longer lenses, especially the folding field cameras, and that using longer focal lengths on LF results in much reduced depth-of-field in comparison to smaller formats. Lenses are big, heavy and fast (i.e., larger maximum aperture) or small, compact and slow (or somewhere in the middle).

An aspect of LF photography that confuses many moving up from smaller formats is the concept of lens "coverage." In order to use movements, especially for architectural work, a lens needs to project a much larger image circle than needed to just cover the film. LF lenses come in "families" based on their angles of coverage. Generally (and I'm being very general here...), there are "normal" lenses and "wide" lenses (note that "wide" here has nothing to do with focal length, but rather with angle of coverage). There are a few telephoto designs for LF as well. Do take time on the LF home page to familiarize yourself with the various types and their coverage capabilities before purchasing. As a general rule, longer lenses (say 150mm and longer) have more coverage than you'll likely need; it is in the shorter focal lengths that you often run into coverage problems. A 135mm "normal-design" (I'm talking about Plasmat designs here, e.g., Nikkor or Fujinon "W" lenses or Schneider "Symmar" types) will vignette with extreme movements. A 90mm lens for a 4x5 camera needs to be of a wide-angle design in order to cover at all. So, one thing you need to think about before buying is how much coverage you will need from your lenses. If you plan on using movements a lot, especially rise/fall and shift, then you should look at lenses with lots of coverage.

The tradeoffs for both cameras an lenses are weight, bulk and movement capabilities versus portability. If you work in the studio primarily, then a heavy monorail camera is not a problem and offers a lot of bellows draw and movement capabilities and you can use big, fast lenses with lots of coverage. If (like me) you work in the field primarily and spend a lot of time hiking and climbing with your kit, then you may want to optimize your kit for portability, which means a lightweight folding camera with more limited movements and leightweight lenses that are slower and have less coverage. Of course, there is a spectrum of choices between the two extremes.

Here's a down-and-dirty list of kinds of LF photography and some of the necessities they entail (Note: I'm assuming a 4x5 camera here; if you decide on a larger format, then the lens focal lengths are proportionally longer):

Studio portraiture: Full-featured monorail camera with lots of bellows draw. Coverage is less of an issue with portraiture, but you'll likely want fast and longer "portrait-focal-length" lenses in the 210mm-360mm range to start.

Table-top, product and other "close-up" photography: Again, a full featured monorail with lots of bellows draw is best (some monorails have more bellows draw than others). Rear-standard focus capability is a must. Many general-purpose lenses in the range from about 135mm-210mm can be used here, but if you do a lot of real close work, lenses optimized for macro work are great. Coverage is also less of an issue here, but faster lenses are really nice when working with modelling lights and lots of bellows draw.

Architectural work: Lens coverage and a camera with adequate movements are the primary concerns here. If you want to keep things "square" and avoid converging verticals, you'll be using lots of front rise and lots of shift. Additionally, you'll likely be using shorter focal-length lenses in the 65mm (or shorter) to 135mm range; 90mm is a "standard" wide lens for architectural work. Shooting interiors in close quarters demands the utmost in coverage and camera flexibility and a monorail camera (with bag bellows) and big, fast short lenses with lots of coverage are standard. That said, I do a lot of architectural work outdoors (cityscapes, etc.) with a full-featured wooden folding camera with bag bellows and lenses with moderate coverage, although I routinely do run out of lens coverage.

Hand-held more "spontaneous" LF photography: Hand-holding 4x5 cameras used to be the norm before smaller formats (just look at any film from the 40s-50s). Smaller formats replaced the "press" cameras in news reporting for obvious reasons, however, if you want to take advantage of larger film size, hand-holding a 4x5 camera still viable. Things you might hand-hold for are: street photography, informal portraits, working on moving vehicles (photos from trains, cars, boats) or anyplace tripods are inconvenient or not allowed. For this you'll need a press camera with rangefinder focusing. The Crown and Speed Graphic, Linhof press cameras and similar cameras from other manufacturers are standard here. Normally, you have a lens or two that is coupled to the rangefinder via a camming system since focusing on the ground glass is not practical. Graphic.org has all the info you'll ever need on those cameras.

Landscape photography: I've saved this for last, since it is my area of greatest expertise. Most people who pack their camera around choose a folding model. Some like metal folding cameras for their ruggedness, sturdiness and durability (e.g., Toyo 45A Wista or Linhof metal cameras); the downside here is weight. Others, like me, opt for wooden folding cameras. A bare-bones wooden folder has more limited movements, bellows draw of around 300mm and often no shift feature; they are, however, very light. The most full-featured wooden folders have more bellows draw and more extensive movements. Traditional designs of this sort are heavier, but there is a new generation of full-featured wooden cameras that are very light (e.g., Chamonix 45N-2); the downside here is a bit less sturdiness and a bit more fiddly controls for the movements. Lenses with less coverage and smaller maximum apertures are significantly lighter and smaller, and are therefore often part of field kits.

Now I'll get personal: For me, portability and light weight are paramount. My usual kit consists of a lightweight, but full-featured wooden field camera. (I love my Wista SW for city work, as it has a bag-bellows option, but my got-to field camera is my Wista DX; if I were to start over, I'd look at the Chamonix cameras very closely.) I could go a bit lighter, but I can't live without shift on at least one standard. My lens kit is all lightweight and/or slow lenses: 135mm Plasmat, 203mm Ektar, Fujinon 240mm, Nikkor M 300mm. My wide lens for day hikes is a Schneider Super Angulon 90mm f/8; the smaller of the 90mms offered by them.

Sorry this has become so long, but I do hope it helps you in your decision-making.

Best,

Doremus

cinetango
30-Dec-2016, 12:27
Thank you so much for your replies and the time you took to help me out!!

I purchased two books on LF that I am waiting anxiously to receive to continue my education before I pull the trigger on any camera

As of now I am looking for a 4x5 camera and playing with the idea of a monorail or folding. Which folding camera that has the most movement do you guys recommend?
Mostly for B&W portraits and landscapes.

I know this is the tip of the iceberg, then I have to do research on tripods, developing and scanning.

I look forward to hearing more from all of you.

Thanks again,

Raul

Two23
30-Dec-2016, 14:08
I started with a Cambo monorail and went to a folding field camera within a year. I've been shooting 4x5 for about 20 years now. Mostly I photo small towns, abandoned farms, portraits (with flash for $$,) and trains. I'm largely an outdoor photographer on the Northern Plains. Some thoughts:


1. Start with a clear vision of what you will shoot and where, your interests, your goals. You need to think through how you will make prints or post images online from a 4x5 negative--traditional dark room or scanner. You need to think through what lenses you anticipate using the most, based on what you use now. By thinking things through you will save a lot of time, money, and frustration. You also need to analyze your style in the field. It takes about 20 minutes to set up the camera, take a meter reading, focus, set exposure on the lens, etc. If you can work at a slow and thoughtful pace 4x5 will work for you. Otherwise, not so much.

2. Camera. A field camera (folding) would be best for what you say you will do. They are more portable and more convenient. However, they are more expensive. You could make an inexpensive (but still good quality) monorail work for you by keeping it assembled with lens attached and bellows compressed. It will be bulky to hike with, but it will work. What ever camera you buy I suggest having a tripod head that uses Arca Swiss style quick release, and put a generic flat plate on the camera. A field camera has less movements but if you aren't doing product shots or architecture a field camera will have enough. I never use movements for portraits. I often use rise or fall for small town photos and some landscapes, sometimes use tilt for landscapes. My field camera almost always has enough movements and the times it doesn't, the lens coverage isn't enough anyway.

3. Lenses. Start with one. Think this through carefully by analyzing what your most used lens is now. To get the equivalent lens from a 35mm camera to a 4x5 you can roughly multiply by three. Thus, if you use a 28mm on a Leica, a 90mm will be about what you want on 4x5. If you shoot portraits with an 85mm on a Nikon, you will want something between 210 and 250mm on 4x5. For landscape I'd suggest something 90mm to 135mm. You can find some GREAT portrait lenses that aren't too much money if you stay away from modern (anything with Copal shutter) and buy lenses 50+ years old. My favorite is a 240mm Dagor that was made around 1912. Do you need flash sync, or not?

4. Accessories. Light meter, dark cloth (I use a jacket,) focus loupe, 4x5 film holders, maybe a cable release. If your camera doesn't have a built in level, buy a cheap six inch torpedo level and level up the camera with that.


I suggest buying one lens and trying things out to see if this clicks with you or not. As for your wife, I just hide stuff in my car. Or, tell her you want to take photos of the kids and family. Wives seem to go along with that. Another secret I'll pass along is to never have all your stuff in one place where the wife can see it all at once.


Kent in SD

David Karp
30-Dec-2016, 15:29
I mostly photograph landscapes. I started with a monorail camera - an older style Calumet 45NX (same as the Cambo SC series). I think it helped to start with a monorail. I had the possibility of using all movements. After a while, I developed a way of working and learned what I needed in a view camera for my personal style. Then I supplemented my monorail with a folding field camera that had the features/movements I knew that I wanted when making photos.

Of course, along the way I have had a few monorails and added an old Whole Plate camera. My current monorail is an ARCA Swiss Discovery, to which I added an older style ARCA Swiss 5x7 back purchased from a forum member, and for which I had a bellows made.

Get ready to jump into the rabbit hole! :-)

Andrew O'Neill
30-Dec-2016, 18:57
Welcome!

brucetaylor
30-Dec-2016, 19:00
I really like the Linhof Color (and Kardan Color) line of cameras (monorails). They can be found very inexpensively on eBay and they are Linhof quality. Lenses: 210mm is great and cheap. 135 is nice, a little wide, also inexpensive. A 90mm Super Angulon f8 should set you back no more than $200 for a nice wide angle. A few accessories and you're ready to go. Don't stress too much, just jump in and enjoy.

Will Frostmill
30-Dec-2016, 19:37
Hi!
I doubt I'll say anything new, but here's my two cents:
4x5 is easier and cheaper than 8x10 or 5x7.
The cheapest 4x5 monorail cameras are usually the Calumet/Orbit 400 series, probably followed by the occasional Cambo, if it has all the parts. Calumets do not have detachable standards, bellows, backs, etc, so you don't have any ambiguity about whether you have the right thing.
The cheapest 4x5 folding camera with movements is likely to be a 5x7 B&J (gray paint) with a 4x5 reducing back. (I've never used one.)
That is all about cheap - later on once you have a good feel for 4x5, you can easily see what you really need, and you can decide how much you really want to pay to get it. You can get slightly easier, slightly lighter, better looking, and/or slightly more specialized.

Remember to budget money for film holders.

Picking lenses:
Think about the angle of view you like. I choose by the width - the long side. Try this link: http://lensn2shutter.com/angleofviewchart.html
I'll cheat, and go off the top of my head:
90mm -> 24mm or 28mm-e ... common, cheap at f/8. Almost always really good.
127mm-135mm -> 35mm-e or 40mm-e ... very common 1940's press lenses, cheap, no room for movements. I've seen them for as little as $75
150-162mm -> 50mm-e ... everyone has one, no one wants to sell them, so prices vary a lot
210mm -> 60mm-e ... nobody wants them since they are normal on 5x7 but not really anything on 4x5. Cheap, lots of room for movements!
250-60ish -> 80mm-e ... people like these, so not very cheap.
300mm -> 100mm-e ... normal on 8x10, so you are competing with wealthy people. Still, you can occasionally find some for right around $300.
More than 300mm ... highly sought after by people doing ulf, wet-plate, portrait focal lengths for 8x10. Expensive.

Lenses are an education in and of themselves. Look for ones mounted on boards, or at least with retaining rings/flanges.

Good Light, and Good Luck!

Will Frostmill
30-Dec-2016, 20:35
Also, for what to tell your wife:

...


I have no idea. For me, I can be honest: it makes me happy, this is something I want to try, I want to demystify this and find out for myself what it is really like. I chose older cameras that looked cool, and I was upfront about the fact that how they looked mattered to me.

I did not talk about smooth tonality, megapixel equivalents, art vs craft, printing large, contact prints, acutance, portraiture, movements, or anything like that. I may have spent some time on bokeh, but that's a known obsession with me.

Unlike other forms of photography, LF does okay on resale. Take care of your equipment, shop wisely, and you'll be out shipping costs and ebay fees. Unlike digital. Unlike some 35mm and MF equipment.

Even shopping - without buying - for LF gear can be a rewarding hobby. This rabbit hole does go down quite far indeed. If I may, I suggest this:
just buy something in your budget, a pair of inexpensive lenses, a filmholder, and a box of cheap b&w film, make a few exposures, and see what you think. People make it hard. It's not. Or it's not hard if it's fun. And of it's not fun, don't do it. Sell your stuff and move on. There's lots of shiny objects in photography to go around, so there's lots of hope.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

B.S.Kumar
31-Dec-2016, 06:44
just buy something in your budget, a pair of inexpensive lenses, a filmholder, and a box of cheap b&w film

All good, except that I'd say one inexpensive lens, at least five film holders and a box of a standard b&w film like Delta. Learn your chops with one lens. And coming from 35mm and MF, you'll wonder what to do after the first couple of images :)

Kumar

cinetango
1-Jan-2017, 06:38
Happy New Year to all!!!

Thanks for all the advice! I will continue learning and window shopping for a while...although I feel very often the temptation of clicking the "Buy Now" button! Until now a monorail camera I think will do for experimenting at an affordable price tag.

In regards to tripods what would you guys recommend? Also, for scanners I have been looking at the Epson v700 & v800, what do you think? I currently have Canon 9000f...

Thanks again!!

cheers,

Raul

cinetango
1-Jan-2017, 07:07
One more question...

What is your take on the Toyo View 45G?

B.S.Kumar
1-Jan-2017, 17:03
The Toyo G and its predecessor D are fine cameras. They are also inexpensive, tough and modular.

David Karp
1-Jan-2017, 17:20
I agree with Kumar. The Toyos are nice. They are heavy too. An advantage of Toyos is that not only are they modular, there are a ton of used accessories available for them. Other brands for which there are similarly large amounts of accessories available are Cambo and Sinar.

John Kasaian
2-Jan-2017, 08:24
For a low cost used tripod, a full size Tilt-all by Marchioni (sp?) or Leitz can be found for around $90+/- used. These have an attached head and are suitable for Calumet 400 & Graphic Views. Many prefer more modern tripods with added features. Having a secure, super stable tripod is vital for success. Manufacturers like Manfrotto will catalog how heavy a camera their different models will support.

dpn
2-Jan-2017, 10:08
Your budget is quite feasible. I started with a nice Calumet View Camera for $80, a Tiltall tripod for $50, a Fujinon-NW 210mm f/5.6 lens for ~$150. My loupe was from Harbor Freight, and was maybe $1? For a darkcloth, I use a black XXL t-shirt glued inside a white XXL t-shirt. It works really well and was like $10 total. Add in film and some holders, and you're set.

Two23
2-Jan-2017, 12:46
The main difference between epson v700 & v800 seems to be LED light on the v800. It will provide more color consistency over time. Not a factor for me--I use v700. As for tripod, a Bogen/Manfrotto 3021 if you buy a monorail. You need something solid. These are plentiful on ebay, and under $100. Avoid the "pistol grip" head like a disease.


Kent in SD

Randy
3-Jan-2017, 06:44
Get one camera (4X5) and one lens (135mm - 210mm) and use them for a few years before even thinking about getting another lens.

As for what to tell your wife - when ever my girlfriend notices and comments about me using a camera she hasn't seen before, I simply respond (lie) "I've had it for a long time - just haven't used it much".

John Kasaian
3-Jan-2017, 09:26
Get one camera (4X5) and one lens (135mm - 210mm) and use them for a few years before even thinking about getting another lens.

As for what to tell your wife - when ever my girlfriend notices and comments about me using a camera she hasn't seen before, I simply respond (lie) "I've had it for a long time - just haven't used it much".
Great advice, but don't lie to your bride--such can substantially add to the cost of your camera gear!

Kevin Crisp
3-Jan-2017, 11:13
I started with a $300 ("The Recycler" which was a proto-Craigslist) Tachihara 4x5. I used it happily until a burglar took it in 1990. It was a good first camera for landscapes. I have many others today but use my Crown Graphic the most. It gets the job done.

cinetango
3-Jan-2017, 22:52
Hello all and a happy New 2017 the best for all!

Ok, it did not take long for me to pull the trigger...I am in the middle of purchasing a Toyo 45D with a lens and some other accessories... What do you think...? enough to get me started? Now all the other interesting questions begin....

I just need to get a tripod for this camera...

Regarding the wife, it is better to ask for forgiveness than to ask for permission... ;-)

Hope to be showing you all some of my photos good and bad...

Thanks for all your input.

Raul

David Karp
3-Jan-2017, 23:12
Congrats! What lens did you purchase? You are lucky to be in LA from a camera store perspective. You can drive to Freestyle or Samy's and buy film or paper in person! You are not far from Flutot's camera repair (Whittier) if your shutter needs servicing. Not far (compared to most people) from Yosemite, Kings Canyon, Sequoia, Bode, and many, many other great locations.

cinetango
8-Jan-2017, 15:02
Hello,

Waiting anxiously on getting my camera and lens from Japan...
Now to the next step...The tripod...
I am looking at a Manfrotto MT055XPRO3...
What do you guys think for my Toyo 45D?

Leszek Vogt
8-Jan-2017, 16:00
Try getting one with 3 legs and no middle column. The column will eventually loosen....and then you might as well use a beanbag, since it will not move on you. If you are serious, get a tripod that will last, otherwise you'll end up with a pile of tripods in the closet....and none usable.

Les

cinetango
8-Jan-2017, 16:03
Try getting one with 3 legs and no middle column. The column will eventually loosen....and then you might as well use a beanbag, since it will not move on you. If you are serious, get a tripod that will last, otherwise you'll end up with a pile of tripods in the closet....and none usable.

Les

Thanks for the advise Leszek, I do agree with you...Any tripod that you recommend, brand and model?

Thanks

drew.saunders
8-Jan-2017, 16:12
Hello,

Waiting anxiously on getting my camera and lens from Japan...
Now to the next step...The tripod...
I am looking at a Manfrotto MT055XPRO3...
What do you guys think for my Toyo 45D?

Manfrotto tripods used to be imported and re-labeled "Bogen," then "Bogen/Manfrotto" before just being called "Manfrotto," so a search for used tripods under the Bogen name can get you good, old, very serviceable tripods. I have an old B&H source book (think super-sized catalog/reference book) from ~2001 that lists the aluminum 3xxx Bogen tripods and their maximum weight. Your Toyo45D isn't in that catalog, but other Toyo cameras are. It's worth downloading, see https://www.bhphotovideo.com/find/FreeCatalog.jsp and scroll down to the bottom to get the "Professional Photo Sourcebook" PDF files (whole thing at https://static.bhphotovideo.com/FrameWork/Product_Resources/SourceBookProPhoto/Pro-Photo-SourceBook.pdf).

30xx were silver legs, 32xx were black legs, but (except for the 3001/3205), the next two digits would indicate the same model.

3001/3205 (my older tripod, which was good enough for a wood field 4x5) have a max capacity of 11lbs, so maybe a bit light for your Toyo.
3011/3211 and 3021/3221 have a capacity of 13.2lbs and a max height of around 67-70" depending on the model. It looks like the biggest difference between the 3011 and 3021 is the minimum height, in that the 3021 series allow the legs to be spread to get much lower. I don't know if they're sturdy enough for your Toyo, perhaps someone who's used one can chime in. There's a 3021S with shorter legs, you'll want to avoid that one.
3033/3233 will handle 15.6lbs, max height of 66.5", which should be plenty good enough. In the old catalog, this is called the "Professional" tripod, and is shown with a monorail camera. This and higher models have a geared center column.
3036/3236 steps up to 26.4lbs and 81.25"
3046/3246 use a bi-post design, handle 26.4lbs and have a max height of 68.5". That was (and likely still is) a popular tripod for studio view cameras. The catalog calls it "The Sturdy Tripod"

If you see one sold with a head, it'll likely be an appropriate one for the capacity of the tripod, and might be a better deal than trying to find both.

http://www.bogentripodparts.com not only lists parts should you need to repair one, but have photos of all the various models, which can help you learn more if you see one you like for sale.

Welcome to Large Format!

cinetango
8-Jan-2017, 20:21
Manfrotto tripods used to be imported and re-labeled "Bogen," then "Bogen/Manfrotto" before just being called "Manfrotto," so a search for used tripods under the Bogen name can get you good, old, very serviceable tripods. I have an old B&H source book (think super-sized catalog/reference book) from ~2001 that lists the aluminum 3xxx Bogen tripods and their maximum weight. Your Toyo45D isn't in that catalog, but other Toyo cameras are. It's worth downloading, see https://www.bhphotovideo.com/find/FreeCatalog.jsp and scroll down to the bottom to get the "Professional Photo Sourcebook" PDF files (whole thing at https://static.bhphotovideo.com/FrameWork/Product_Resources/SourceBookProPhoto/Pro-Photo-SourceBook.pdf).

30xx were silver legs, 32xx were black legs, but (except for the 3001/3205), the next two digits would indicate the same model.

3001/3205 (my older tripod, which was good enough for a wood field 4x5) have a max capacity of 11lbs, so maybe a bit light for your Toyo.
3011/3211 and 3021/3221 have a capacity of 13.2lbs and a max height of around 67-70" depending on the model. It looks like the biggest difference between the 3011 and 3021 is the minimum height, in that the 3021 series allow the legs to be spread to get much lower. I don't know if they're sturdy enough for your Toyo, perhaps someone who's used one can chime in. There's a 3021S with shorter legs, you'll want to avoid that one.
3033/3233 will handle 15.6lbs, max height of 66.5", which should be plenty good enough. In the old catalog, this is called the "Professional" tripod, and is shown with a monorail camera. This and higher models have a geared center column.
3036/3236 steps up to 26.4lbs and 81.25"
3046/3246 use a bi-post design, handle 26.4lbs and have a max height of 68.5". That was (and likely still is) a popular tripod for studio view cameras. The catalog calls it "The Sturdy Tripod"

If you see one sold with a head, it'll likely be an appropriate one for the capacity of the tripod, and might be a better deal than trying to find both.

http://www.bogentripodparts.com not only lists parts should you need to repair one, but have photos of all the various models, which can help you learn more if you see one you like for sale.

Welcome to Large Format!

Thank you for all the input!! This is very helpful.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Two23
8-Jan-2017, 21:25
A used Bogen/Manfrotto 3021 will do what you want. Get a tripod head that has a quick release, and a plate that attaches to the camera. This will make your life much easier. I highly recommend buying used from ebay (or here.) Hard to go wrong and you save a lot. I had a Bogen/Manfrotto 3001 and do not recommend it for 4x5.


Kent in SD

cinetango
8-Jan-2017, 21:45
OK!!!
All bought except for a couple of minor things...
Camera Toyo 45D
Lens Fujinon NW 210mm f/5.6
Backs
Tripod Manfrotto/Bogen 3021 with Manfrotto XPRO Magnesium Ball Head
film
Scanner
Printer
Angry wife...

No excuses!!! time to go out and shoot!! Time to learn LF photography!!

Thanks everyone for feeding my capitalistic OCD!!!

Hope to share some photos soon...
I will be asking plenty of questions shortly.

Raul