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ciennepi
10-Nov-2016, 07:53
Hi to all of the readers of my message. I have just registered to this forum because I now have a large format camera.
I'am not new to photography or to analog photography.
I take photo from the age of 15 with small format camera (Yashika FX3) for much years and then with digital poin and shoot.
After a few years of pause i made a new begin with photography, but this time only with film, paper and developer :)
In seven years of new practice I buy and use a Mamiya RB 67 with 3 lens (50, 90 and 180 mm), a Nikon Fe with 3 lens (24, 50 and 105) and a Hasselblad 500 CM with 3 lens (50, 80 and 150 mm).
I shoot BW film, develop and print it in my temporary darkroom (bath-darkroom)
The last 3 mounth I find two good opportunity to buy a used-like new Sinar Norma with a 150mm Schneider Symmar and a 210mm Fujinon W, and a used-good condition enlarger Durst Laborator 138S.
And now I WILL TRYYYYYYYYYY large format photography.
So help me if I ask something ............. :D

Andrew O'Neill
10-Nov-2016, 11:20
Welcome to the forum, ciennepi!

Alan Gales
10-Nov-2016, 13:41
Hello ciennepi and welcome to the forum! A Sinar Norma is a very capable camera and I think the prettiest monorail ever made. Plus you have two real good lenses to go with it. Durst enlargers are nice too. I'd say you are off to a great start. Ask questions as you need. There are a lot of knowledgeable people here who will be glad to help.

Leigh
10-Nov-2016, 22:02
Hi, ciennepi, and welcome to LFPF.

Feel free to post any questions you may have about the equipment, the materials, or the processes.

We'll be happy to help if we can.

- Leigh

Sirius Glass
11-Nov-2016, 16:06
Welcome to Large Format Photography Forum

We know that you are a wise person because you use film and use Hasselblads. Welcome!

ciennepi
14-Nov-2016, 05:44
Thank you all for the welcome. And yes, Alan, I think that the Norma is a wonderful camera, for the design and the precision construction.
The only drawback is it's weight, about 3,3 kg, but when I bought it I listen a lot of advice that, in the large format world, it's better to begin with a camera with full movements. With time I will understand what I really need and if I can skip to something lighter.

Alan Gales
17-Nov-2016, 14:20
Thank you all for the welcome. And yes, Alan, I think that the Norma is a wonderful camera, for the design and the precision construction.
The only drawback is it's weight, about 3,3 kg, but when I bought it I listen a lot of advice that, in the large format world, it's better to begin with a camera with full movements. With time I will understand what I really need and if I can skip to something lighter.

That's a good way to look at it. First learn what you need.

The Norma has a lot of front rise for architecture. You can also use long lenses with it for head or head and shoulder portraits. I like heavy cameras and tripods for portraits. Sometimes you bump the camera or tripod when directing your subject. Heavy stays put. :) If you want to add a lighter field camera later you may want to keep the Norma too. Just buy a Sinar to Technika adapter lens board so you can easily swap lenses between the two cameras.