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CallieKrawill
6-Nov-2016, 20:59
Right now, I am planning a tour to west states of the US. This is the tour, I am planning for last 3 years, but can't peruse due to my tedious job. I am kicked out of the job, so I had decided to hit the road. My destinations will include California, Nevada, Oregon, Idaho, Washington states. Cities like Los Angeles, San Francisco, San Diego, Sacramento, San Jose, Palm Springs, Santa Barbara, Las Vegas, Reno, Phoenix, Tucson, Tempe, Portland, Eugene, Seattle, Spokane, Boise, Idaho Falls. I am living in Hamilton Canada. My grandparents were migrated from Jacksonville, Florida. And I am originally from Wolfsburg, Germany. We were thinking about this tour on bicycles but it is more than 7000 km. So, we decided to travel either using a train or local buses (from cities to cities) and plane for the state to state travel.

This is 17 days tour, I have booked following hotels:-


Sheraton Gateway Los Angeles
DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Sacramento
Paramount Hotel
Warwick Seattle
Some others


Please include your suggestions in the replies and also suggest, if other hotels are better or have better facilities at cheaper rates.

At last, here is my main question. As I am leaving on 23rd November I need some fast replies here. My grandfather was a Korean War survivor and participated in WWII as a battalion Commander. After the Korean war, he was stationed at Naval Amphibious Base Coronado. He has many sweet memories of that place, we can feel the sweetness from his fun and adventurous stories tone (which he told us during our childhood). At the time of his death, we made a pact to visit the base (this include me, my younger sister Jenni and our cousin. Also 1 grandson of my grandfather all time bestie). We really want to see the base from the inside, but we don't know how to get inside. We tried to contact the authorities using telephone and email. But they are re-directing us in confusing circles. If you have visited http://militarybases.co/directory/naval-base-coronado-navy-base-in-san-diego-ca/ or any navy base in the past or your family/friends had or you are serving in the navy (and help us out) or if you are living near to that base, we will be thankful, if you could guide us. If there is a permission procedure, please guide us with that too. Also, is any type of recording material allowed inside the base?

Bob Salomon
7-Nov-2016, 06:46
First of all, if you are planning a trip with multiple hotels you should choose one hotel company and register to become a member of that hotel group so you get points for your stays that will result in receiving freebies like free nights, meals, room upgrades, etc. that will be cheaper in the long run then staying at multiple brands of hotels.
Then call the base directly and tell them that you would like to visit and why. They will tell you if it is possible and what you need to do and what you must bring with you and what you can't bring with you on the base.

goamules
7-Nov-2016, 06:58
Unless you meet someone who is active duty, it will be hard to get on a base to just take a tour. I see you're asking for a current Navy serviceman, that's a good choice. If you can't find someone, there are sometimes other public relations events.

You just missed Fleet Week, a big open base activity. https://www.fleetweeksandiego.org/events/fleet-week-coronado-speed-festival/navy-open-house/

Try calling public affairs http://www.cnic.navy.mil/regions/cnrsw/installations/navbase_coronado/about/public_affairs_office.html

LabRat
7-Nov-2016, 07:06
I expect that they will be too security conscious to allow access because of security and liability issues, unless they are set-up for a public viewing event day...

My brother who is a tugboat captain told me of a base where even cameraphones were banned because of the image forming thing inside... Employees scrambled to find the last of the remaining flip-fones that didn't have a camera function that were permitted on base...

I think the contact is the press officer on base... You will probably have better luck locating the vessels that have been converted into floating museums by private or public organizations...

Good Luck, and report back...

Steve K

jnanian
7-Nov-2016, 07:38
often times using a camera isn't allowed on military installations. i've documented
structures at a few navy hards navy bases and having cameras meant
having the serial #s of everything recorded, a "pass" and the film being processed
and "okay'd" before it left the installation.
i'd call public affairs directly and see what they have to say. also call the congressman/woman from that district and ask him or her
for some advice. maybe it can be an arranged pr event for the congressman/woman and they will allow cameras and give a tour.

seabee1999
7-Nov-2016, 08:17
I don't think you'll have time to get the authorization needed to get on. Requests to get onto a base need to be submitted to the base security manager at least 30 days prior to the intended visit date and for a specific event or intended location. Even after that, a sponsor of some type would need to walk with you to the spot you're authorized to see and back immediately to the gate again. You cannot take images of sensitive locations (so mostly everything) and really the only place one can take an image is in base housing or if you have authorization via the Public Affairs Officer to take an image. If you have a friend stationed at the San Diego base, they can sponsor you on. Aside from following the proper authorization process or a sponsor, the best you'll be able to see is the base from outside the fence.

R/
Dave

Bob Salomon
7-Nov-2016, 08:35
If there is a museum open to the public you might be able to get to see it. But otherwise you usually just can't show up. I once had an appointment with some people at Hanford after it was closing down and cleaning up. I was driven to the base by my sales rep in WA state. Once we reached the entrance, even though I had an appointment on the base and had been pre-cleared in advance by security I still had to present my passport and driver's license, at the gate. I was cleared in with no problem, but when my rep presented his Canadian Passport (he has dual citizenship) they would not let him past the gate. He had to drive around for 4 hours until my meeting was over.
Some US bases, like Elgin in Fl, are also the regional airport and entry to the terminal area is no problem for anyone. But getting onto the base, itself, is much more difficult.

DrTang
7-Nov-2016, 09:48
if you are looking for reasonably priced stays in Santa Barbara - good luck, although Late Nov might be okay

but try Carpinteria instead..it's close and cheaper

Will Whitaker
7-Nov-2016, 10:17
Don't even consider photography. Otherwise you'll probably get a free tour of the brig.

Security at military facilities is very high. Anything with data storage capacity will get you thrown out. That means cell phones or other mobile devices such as pads. Also means any type of digital camera. It's not just images they're concerned about. Enjoy the trip, live for the moment, reminisce about your grandfather.

Alan Gales
7-Nov-2016, 10:22
Back in 1983 I was on a beach in Pensacola, Florida right next to the Naval base. They had a sign posted that no professional photography was allowed. There were a whole bunch of people with cameras snapping away so I took out my first 35mm camera a Canon AV-1. I was immediately approached by an armed guard who asked me if I hadn't read the sign. I told him that I was just an amateur. He told me that I didn't handle a camera like an amateur. I ended up putting the camera back into the car.

Like I said, that was back in 1983 and I wasn't even on the base. With all the increased security today you better call the base and ask questions before you go. Also if you are allowed to shoot pictures you may want to look like you don't know what you are doing. :)

sepiareverb
7-Nov-2016, 10:25
I got detained by Navy Security for about an hour, separated from my identification because I took a photograph of a fence at the "USS Constitution" (irony) in Boston. It is a Navy boat/museum that thousands of people visit every day in the summer. The fences are perhaps extremely high tech in some way, disguised to look exactly like regular chain link? I don't know, all I know is that while my family was taking the tour of the boat I got a nice look at the inside of a Navy Jeep.

Don't mess with the military. They are above the law.

Bob Salomon
7-Nov-2016, 10:54
Back in 1983 I was on a beach in Pensacola, Florida right next to the Naval base. They had a sign posted that no professional photography was allowed. There were a whole bunch of people with cameras snapping away so I took out my first 35mm camera a Canon AV-1. I was immediately approached by an armed guard who asked me if I hadn't read the sign. I told him that I was just an amateur. He told me that I didn't handle a camera like an amateur. I ended up putting the camera back into the car.

Like I said, that was back in 1983 and I wasn't even on the base. With all the increased security today you better call the base and ask questions before you go. Also if you are allowed to shoot pictures you may want to look like you don't know what you are doing. :)

When I was 13, way back in 1954, one of my presents was a new Minox system. Another was a trip with my father's New England sales representative. We started off from my home in Darien, CT and headed to New London and Groton where he had scheduled his first stops. That was quite a long stretch as this was before the CT Thruway had been built so it was on the Merritt Parkway, the Wilbur Cross and the Post Road. When we finally got their we were passing the submarine base and decided to stop so I could take some pictures, through the fence, of the subs with my Minox. While doing this the rep stayed in his car on the side of the road with his motor running and I at 13 was busy taking pictures of the subs with my Minox. After just a few minutes two Navy jeeps pulled up and bracketed us and 4 Shore Patrolmen wanted to know what I was doing. So I told them that " I was taking pictures of the subs" they then wanted to know why I was doing it with a Minox? So we told them that it was my birthday present and was the only camera that I had for the trip. After a couple of hours of questions and answers and some conversations between the SP's and their superiors, we were finally allowed to go on our way, after I gave them the film in the camera and all other rolls that we had with us, exposed or unexposed. Have you ever tried to buy more Minox film in mom and pop camera stores in the 50s? We couldn't find any.

djdister
7-Nov-2016, 11:06
So to sum up, forget about getting on any U.S. military base, and forget about taking any photos on or near a U.S. military base. Enjoy the cities...

BrianShaw
7-Nov-2016, 11:07
I got detained by Navy Security for about an hour, separated from my identification because I took a photograph of a fence at the "USS Constitution" (irony) in Boston. It is a Navy boat/museum that thousands of people visit every day in the summer. The fences are perhaps extremely high tech in some way, disguised to look exactly like regular chain link? I don't know, all I know is that while my family was taking the tour of the boat I got a nice look at the inside of a Navy Jeep.

Don't mess with the military. They are above the law.

Interestingly, the Constitution is not just a historical relic and museum... but still an active commissioned warship.

Jim Noel
7-Nov-2016, 11:56
In San Diego you can visit the USS Midway, an aircraft carrier, and take all the photos you desire. On most weekends there are other Navy vessels tied up on the city side of the bay for public visitation. I don't know about photography on or around these. Don't think about taking pictures across the bay of the Navy ships tied up on Coronado. By the time you get the camera on the tripod there will likely be more than one policeman or Shore Patrol alongside.Perhaps if you are very close friends with a Congressman he or she can take you on a base, but that would still not allow pictures.

Leszek Vogt
7-Nov-2016, 13:06
Unless there is a public show (like airshow w/Blue Angels, etc) your entry onto the base will be rather curtailed or blocked...as it has been indicated.

Bob, Minox ?, are you kiddn ? That has been used as a spy camera....I'm surprised that several hefty charges didn't followed....while one sits in jail. No doubt THAT would happen in any serious sub-base.

Les

Drew Wiley
7-Nov-2016, 13:15
All the Naval bases here in the Bay Area are shut down. The big naval facility on Mare Island is open as a park to the public, with museums, a lovely Naval Cemetery, and lots of interesting buildings, both industrial and residential, to potentially photograph, depending on what has been cleaned up to date per hazmat. The SF waterfront has a Maritime Museum plus a couple of docked ships open to the public in museum fashion. Then you've got analogous WWII military sights on both sides of the Golden Gate - lot's to see. Pt Molate is still under restoration and not open to the public yet except by guided tour. The Alameda and Hunter's Point
bases have been gentrified and will probably be less interesting in terms of intact naval history.

Leigh
7-Nov-2016, 13:32
Photography is prohibited at ALL Defense installations per 18 USC 795 (Title 18 United States Code Section 795).

Text of the statute is available here: https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/18/795

Local commanders can waive this prohibition for individuals or public events if they determine such action is in the public interest. Such waivers are usually handled through the base Public Affairs Office or similar name.

- Leigh

sepiareverb
7-Nov-2016, 13:52
Interestingly, the Constitution is not just a historical relic and museum... but still an active commissioned warship.

That tourists presumably photograph all day long inside and out. I have some snaps I made there in 1976 or 77 with a Kodak Pony 2.

This time I was interested in the dry dock between the boat and the buildings, protected behind the fence. A large red flag.

Bob Salomon
7-Nov-2016, 13:57
Unless there is a public show (like airshow w/Blue Angels, etc) your entry onto the base will be rather curtailed or blocked...as it has been indicated.

Bob, Minox ?, are you kiddn ? That has been used as a spy camera....I'm surprised that several hefty charges didn't followed....while one sits in jail. No doubt THAT would happen in any serious sub-base.

Les

Groton is as serious a sub base that you can get. They built the Nautilus there. But they had a hard time making a 13 year old out as a spy. I just happened to have an unusual and suspicious camera with me.

Many, many years later the company that I worked for became the Minox distributor and we did sell a few pieces each year to the Government. But that was just as digital was really coming in and the Government sales really dropped off as digital got better.

Alan Gales
7-Nov-2016, 14:45
When I was 13, way back in 1954, one of my presents was a new Minox system. Another was a trip with my father's New England sales representative. We started off from my home in Darien, CT and headed to New London and Groton where he had scheduled his first stops. That was quite a long stretch as this was before the CT Thruway had been built so it was on the Merritt Parkway, the Wilbur Cross and the Post Road. When we finally got their we were passing the submarine base and decided to stop so I could take some pictures, through the fence, of the subs with my Minox. While doing this the rep stayed in his car on the side of the road with his motor running and I at 13 was busy taking pictures of the subs with my Minox. After just a few minutes two Navy jeeps pulled up and bracketed us and 4 Shore Patrolmen wanted to know what I was doing. So I told them that " I was taking pictures of the subs" they then wanted to know why I was doing it with a Minox? So we told them that it was my birthday present and was the only camera that I had for the trip. After a couple of hours of questions and answers and some conversations between the SP's and their superiors, we were finally allowed to go on our way, after I gave them the film in the camera and all other rolls that we had with us, exposed or unexposed. Have you ever tried to buy more Minox film in mom and pop camera stores in the 50s? We couldn't find any.

Well, Bob, you were shooting a spy camera! ;) I guess you were like me and looked like you knew what you were doing.

LabRat
7-Nov-2016, 17:33
When I was 13, way back in 1954, one of my presents was a new Minox system. Another was a trip with my father's New England sales representative. We started off from my home in Darien, CT and headed to New London and Groton where he had scheduled his first stops. That was quite a long stretch as this was before the CT Thruway had been built so it was on the Merritt Parkway, the Wilbur Cross and the Post Road. When we finally got their we were passing the submarine base and decided to stop so I could take some pictures, through the fence, of the subs with my Minox. While doing this the rep stayed in his car on the side of the road with his motor running and I at 13 was busy taking pictures of the subs with my Minox. After just a few minutes two Navy jeeps pulled up and bracketed us and 4 Shore Patrolmen wanted to know what I was doing. So I told them that " I was taking pictures of the subs" they then wanted to know why I was doing it with a Minox? So we told them that it was my birthday present and was the only camera that I had for the trip. After a couple of hours of questions and answers and some conversations between the SP's and their superiors, we were finally allowed to go on our way, after I gave them the film in the camera and all other rolls that we had with us, exposed or unexposed. Have you ever tried to buy more Minox film in mom and pop camera stores in the 50s? We couldn't find any.

For me, the camera I owned that attracted the MOST attention (more than ANY LF camera on huge tripods) was a Minox B... If I was shooting it anywhere, there was always someone pointing at me while shooting it, even at an airport, the security cops watching the security inspector going through my stuff from 40 feet away were staring at it, and you could ALWAYS read someone's lips saying, "Look, a spy camera!!!"... And film was a PIA to find, even in NYC... Had to give up shooting it (would have loved having a good P&S digital as a constant carry camera back then)... People thought it was evil... :-0

Steve K

Bob Salomon
7-Nov-2016, 17:36
For me, the camera I owned that attracted the MOST attention (more than ANY LF camera on huge tripods) was a Minox B... If I was shooting it anywhere, there was always someone pointing at me while shooting it, even at an airport, the security cops watching the security inspector going through my stuff from 40 feet away were staring at it, and you could ALWAYS read someone's lips saying, "Look, a spy camera!!!"... And film was a PIA to find, even in NYC... Had to give up shooting it (would have loved having a good P&S digital as a constant carry camera back then)... People thought it was evil... :-0

Steve K

You shouldn't have had any problem finding film back then at Ken Hansen but you could have also easily have gotten film at the Minox lab on LI.

LabRat
7-Nov-2016, 17:46
You shouldn't have had any problem finding film back then at Ken Hansen but you could have also easily have gotten film at the Minox lab on LI.

The film was usually on "backorder" when needed (often for a few months), and the only other sources were basement re-loads that were usually badly scratched... I had better luck at Fishkin Bros who had it more often than not... Even the Minox lab often didn't have ANY!!! (Agfa didn't seem too motivated to reliably distribute in the USA)

Steve K

goamules
7-Nov-2016, 18:07
As a former Navy vet, and person who has worked on many bases for many, many years it's fine to take basic photographs of basic things. The Submarine Memorial at Pearl Harbor, The Rocket Sled at Holloman, the tower at Offutt, graduations at NTTC Orlando are all fine. The idea you'll be thrown in the brig for having a cell phone or camera on base is VERY....laughable. Now if you try to go taking pictures of some of the active bomb disposal group training, or the nuclear launch panels in some silo, that's a different matter.

There are hudreds of civilians working on most bases. All have phones and some have cameras. The military doesnt care.

sepiareverb
7-Nov-2016, 18:35
As a former Navy vet, and person who has worked on many bases for many, many years it's fine to take basic photographs of basic things...

Just not a fence at the USS Constitution Museum.


...The military doesnt care.

Well, apparently not if you look like me instead of a vet or republican.

djdister
7-Nov-2016, 18:57
As a former Navy vet, and person who has worked on many bases for many, many years it's fine to take basic photographs of basic things. The Submarine Memorial at Pearl Harbor, The Rocket Sled at Holloman, the tower at Offutt, graduations at NTTC Orlando are all fine. The idea you'll be thrown in the brig for having a cell phone or camera on base is VERY....laughable. Now if you try to go taking pictures of some of the active bomb disposal group training, or the nuclear launch panels in some silo, that's a different matter.

There are hudreds of civilians working on most bases. All have phones and some have cameras. The military doesnt care.

I beg to differ. Maybe the military didn't care so much before 9/11, but just try that now. Civilian and military members are told to abide by 18 USC Section 795, as Leigh cited. If they see you pointing your cell phone camera at facilities, equipment, military personnel, or security features at any military base you will spend some time with the police. For those of you who think the wording in law is ambiguous, here is the exact citation:

(a) Whenever, in the interests of national defense, the President defines certain vital military and naval installations or equipment as requiring protection against the general dissemination of information relative thereto, it shall be unlawful to make any photograph, sketch, picture, drawing, map, or graphical representation of such vital military and naval installations or equipment without first obtaining permission of the commanding officer of the military or naval post, camp, or station, or naval vessels, military and naval aircraft, and any separate military or naval command concerned, or higher authority, and promptly submitting the product obtained to such commanding officer or higher authority for censorship or such other action as he may deem necessary.

(b) Whoever violates this section shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than one year, or both.
(June 25, 1948, ch. 645, 62 Stat. 737; Pub. L. 103322, title XXXIII,  330016(1)(H), Sept. 13, 1994, 108 Stat. 2147.)

seabee1999
7-Nov-2016, 19:49
I beg to differ. Maybe the military didn't care so much before 9/11, but just try that now. Civilian and military members are told to abide by 18 USC Section 795, as Leigh cited. If they see you pointing your cell phone camera at facilities, equipment, military personnel, or security features at any military base you will spend some time with the police. For those of you who think the wording in law is ambiguous, here is the exact citation:

(a) Whenever, in the interests of national defense, the President defines certain vital military and naval installations or equipment as requiring protection against the general dissemination of information relative thereto, it shall be unlawful to make any photograph, sketch, picture, drawing, map, or graphical representation of such vital military and naval installations or equipment without first obtaining permission of the commanding officer of the military or naval post, camp, or station, or naval vessels, military and naval aircraft, and any separate military or naval command concerned, or higher authority, and promptly submitting the product obtained to such commanding officer or higher authority for censorship or such other action as he may deem necessary.

(b) Whoever violates this section shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than one year, or both.
(June 25, 1948, ch. 645, 62 Stat. 737; Pub. L. 103322, title XXXIII,  330016(1)(H), Sept. 13, 1994, 108 Stat. 2147.)

Ok, being in the service currently and having been for 18 yrs now (so before 9/11), I feel the need to say this, the folks who enforce this law are people themselves and will inquire as to why one is taking an image at a particular location and make a judgement call as to whether or not to allow one to continue photographing, to ask to put you gear away or to detain you and to confiscate your gear for further investigation.

I have photographed on bases in both uniform and out of uniform, for official events, personal projects and actual commissioned images to promote the Navy. I have photographed on deployments of even sensitive things, in war zones and even a plane crash at FOB Dwyer (Google EA1 Miller, FOB Dwyer). The point I am making is that as long as you are respectful to the law enforcement agent and do as they say you are to do, things will go fine. I have been asked by a few base police to quickly finish my shot or to not point my camera in a certain direction and this includes in base housing. Please remember, actual enforcement is conducted by folks who are interpreting the situation visually and by what you say (spirit of the law vs enforcement of the law)

R/
Dave

Ironage
8-Nov-2016, 05:09
I agree with the Midway tour. It is right across the bay from the base and you can watch the carriers and the air ops. Go on a Friday and watch a military retirement on the flight deck of the Midway. The Midway has become a project of many retired sailors who lovingly care for her. In someways she is better preserved than the actual fleet. Then take the ferry across to Coronado. Eat at a fine sidewalk cafe. The base itself is never the best memory, but the community around and the awesome hardware, and of course your fellow shipmates.


Sent from my iPod touch using Tapatalk

goamules
8-Nov-2016, 08:57
I beg to differ. Maybe the military didn't care so much before 9/11, but just try that now. Civilian and military members are told to abide by 18 USC Section 795, as Leigh cited. If they see you pointing your cell phone camera at facilities, equipment, military personnel, or security features at any military base you will spend some time with the police. For those of you who think the wording in law is ambiguous, here is the exact citation:

(a) Whenever, in the interests of national defense, the President defines certain vital military and naval installations or equipment as requiring protection against the general dissemination of information relative thereto, it shall be unlawful to make any photograph, sketch, picture, drawing, map, or graphical representation of such vital military and naval installations or equipment without first obtaining permission of the commanding officer of the military or naval post, camp, or station, or naval vessels, military and naval aircraft, and any separate military or naval command concerned, or higher authority, and promptly submitting the product obtained to such commanding officer or higher authority for censorship or such other action as he may deem necessary.

(b) Whoever violates this section shall be fined under this title or imprisoned not more than one year, or both.
(June 25, 1948, ch. 645, 62 Stat. 737; Pub. L. 103–322, title XXXIII,  330016(1)(H), Sept. 13, 1994, 108 Stat. 2147.)


Read it closer. "Whenever, in the interests of national defense, the President defines certain vital military and naval installations or equipment as requiring protection..." The President hasn't designated ALL bases and the fence around the USS Constitution. This is an ancient law, that came out during the Cold War and nuclear testing era. By the way, I was at a base in Washington last week. Taking photos.

The people that have problems photographing things are those looking for problems. You act like you need a talking to....you're going to get talked to. You act like a proud patriot, they'll leave you alone.

goamules
8-Nov-2016, 09:03
Ok, being in the service currently and having been for 18 yrs now (so before 9/11), I feel the need to say this, the folks who enforce this law are people themselves and will inquire as to why one is taking an image at a particular location and make a judgement call as to whether or not to allow one to continue photographing, to ask to put you gear away or to detain you and to confiscate your gear for further investigation.

I have photographed on bases in both uniform and out of uniform, for official events, personal projects and actual commissioned images to promote the Navy. I have photographed on deployments of even sensitive things, in war zones and even a plane crash at FOB Dwyer (Google EA1 Miller, FOB Dwyer). The point I am making is that as long as you are respectful to the law enforcement agent and do as they say you are to do, things will go fine. I have been asked by a few base police to quickly finish my shot or to not point my camera in a certain direction and this includes in base housing. Please remember, actual enforcement is conducted by folks who are interpreting the situation visually and by what you say (spirit of the law vs enforcement of the law)

R/
Dave

Exactly. Good to hear people actually IN the service, or veterans, or civilian contractors saying what I have experienced. There is no problem taking photos on most bases for "tourist" reasons. You try to take pictures of the perimeter fences and their cameras and protective features....well....why are you doing that exactly.

We can ignore the internet blather from those that don't really know the service. Come on, you were talked to for taking a picture of the USS Constitution fence in Boston??! Give me a break, the place is photographed thousands of times a week. But if you crawled up in the bushes, at night, when it's closed, and are acting like a freak....you get what you deserve. From my USS Constitution visit recently, the destroyer next to it:

https://c2.staticflickr.com/6/5629/30226117613_d959cf2bf6_z.jpg

djdister
8-Nov-2016, 09:08
Read it closer. "Whenever, in the interests of national defense, the President defines certain vital military and naval installations or equipment as requiring protection..." The President hasn't designated ALL bases and the fence around the USS Constitution. This is an ancient law, that came out during the Cold War and nuclear testing era. By the way, I was at a base in Washington last week. Taking photos.

The people that have problems photographing things are those looking for problems. You act like you need a talking to....you're going to get talked to. You act like a proud patriot, they'll leave you alone.

Well certainly there are "public" displays and museums that are made accessible to tourists and photography. Just try pointing a camera as you walk up to the Pentagon...

BrianShaw
8-Nov-2016, 09:34
I believe that all US military bases are at FPCON Bravo, and have been for quite a while. That somewhat status drives the sensitivities and "jumpiness" of the base protection authorities, both military and Federal.

There are big differences between photographic policy when on general base areas versus "controlled areas". There's generally plenty of signage to let folks know what the posture on photography is. And the implementation is quite different between visitors and folks with authorized general base access too. There's no "one size fits all" rule and as someone said earlier, the implementation of the rules is subject to discretion of LEO (and others).

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Force_Protection_Condition

But all this aside... visiting a base to see relics of WWII or Korean War may be for naught... Much of that old stuff/facilities may be long gone or significantly updated. It might be just as well to use GoogleEarth and look from that perspective!

goamules
8-Nov-2016, 12:01
I went back to my Navy Tech Training Center in Pensacola, FL last summer. In 1984, I had stood a front gate guard duty midwatch. The old bricks had several initials from previous sailors, so I decided to add mine. In 2015 I went by as a civilian. The official gate had been moved back some, and the old brick gate was 50 yards in front. Still some Navy office or something. I walked up with my wife and friends saying "I want to show you something..." Found my initials, from decades before. And took a picture of them and me!

BrianShaw
8-Nov-2016, 12:35
I went back to my Navy Tech Training Center in Pensacola, FL last summer. In 1984, I had stood a front gate guard duty midwatch. The old bricks had several initials from previous sailors, so I decided to add mine. In 2015 I went by as a civilian. The official gate had been moved back some, and the old brick gate was 50 yards in front. Still some Navy office or something. I walked up with my wife and friends saying "I want to show you something..." Found my initials, from decades before. And took a picture of them and me!

cool... you defaced federal property and got away with it.... even bragged about it on the internet!

But did you take the selfie with a LF camera??????

jp
8-Nov-2016, 17:40
Unless you're after Silicon valley stuff, skip San Jose. Not a bad airport though. Renting a car would probably be the most practical way to get where you want.
Head south to Monterey/Carmel/Point Lobos and the farmland around that to get a feel for that area. Migrant families living+working in fields that would not look out of place in old FSA photos. Dunes like Edward Weston probably learned photography and more from his lady friends. Spend a day at Point Lobos. If you're into cars, Mazda Laguna Seca track is right there too.