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Ari
6-Nov-2016, 10:27
Hi,
I'm going to be printing (digitally) my first portfolio in five years.
In the past I used InDesign for page layouts; it worked ok, I was able to plan out my print size to the nearest centimetre, but the program itself is large and clunky.
The chief advantage of ID, for me, was that I could also easily account for photos that were to be printed on two facing pages, and mix up photos of all sizes.
So I'm wondering if there's anything new I could use, or if ID is still the best option.
If it matters, I'm using Mac OS 10.11.

Thanks in advance.

EdSawyer
7-Nov-2016, 08:05
InDesign is still the best page layout program available. You could use something similar/easier but it would be lacking features. If you already know ID, it's your best choice.

Ari
7-Nov-2016, 08:07
After looking around more at what's out there, I'd tend to agree with you, Ed.
Thanks

Willie
7-Nov-2016, 16:10
In Design is the updated Adobe Pagemaker, right? Before that it was Aldus Pagemaker.
How about Quark Express? Is it still being used for professional layout work these days?

EdSawyer
8-Nov-2016, 07:35
Quark died a while back, they really never made a good transition to OS X. ID has roots in Pagemaker, but basically is a completely different product now, it was several generations ago that it started as Pagemaker (and even then was pretty clear differentiation). I started on pagemaker when it was an Aldus product, enjoyed it as an Adobe product, used Quark a lot when it was dominant, and now ID is basically the only one left standing for serious professional work in prepress/design.

Drew Bedo
30-Nov-2016, 15:11
A printed portfolio; page lay-out and software? I must be a dinosaur. Since the mid m2Ks, I have used Photoshop to optimize a digital scan of a LF negative for an ink-jet print. I print the images I want in a portfolio and put them in an archival print storage box. Other presentstion cases and folders are possible.

I don't understand the software and page layout question.What am I missing?

Respectful, perhaps ignorant Cheers

Ari
30-Nov-2016, 16:51
Drew, maybe others don't do this, but I plan out every page of my portfolio well in advance. It may take several weeks or a few months before I start the actual printing.
I know the size of each photo, the sequence, what size each will be, which photo faces which, etc. all in advance.
Some photos cover two pages, others are 3-4 to a page. There may be 25-50 different photos in one portfolio.
The software is extremely helpful in planning out these things.

faberryman
30-Nov-2016, 16:53
Aren't you really talking about a book rather than a portfolio?

Ari
30-Nov-2016, 18:34
I posted the question because I'm planning a new portfolio, but the question could just as easily have applied to making a book.
I like to play with size, sequencing and layout in every portfolio, having software to plan it out is a must.

Drew Bedo
5-Dec-2016, 06:37
Aren't you really talking about a book rather than a portfolio?

This may just be a matter of word usage. I have always thought of a portfolio of images to be a collection of prints presented as loose unmounted prints or mounted, matted and ready to frame, and housed in some form of presentation case or box.

I too have spent considerable effort in selecting, preparing and ordering what goes into the box. Don't think I have ever put together more than 20 images in a portfolio.

Having done that, I suppose a bound book of the collection would be a next step as a convenient sales tool, but the images would not then be farmable prints. As a prospective buyer I would want to see the actual print before making a buy decision.

These remarks are not intended to be criticism , but indicate that I still domn't "Get It."

I welcome a clarification.

faberryman
5-Dec-2016, 07:00
This may just be a matter of word usage. I have always thought of a portfolio of images to be a collection of prints presented as loose unmounted prints or mounted, matted and ready to frame, and housed in some form of presentation case or box.

My impression too. I guess I am not sophisticated enough, but I am having trouble envisaging a portfolio that isn't a book where there are more than one image on a page and where some images cover two pages. Maybe the web?

When I work on a project, I rarely have 50 images, more or in the 20-30 range. Depending on the size of the prints, I just lay them on a table or the floor to arrange them. I haven't scanned my work and put it on the web.

Drew Bedo
5-Dec-2016, 07:21
Well I have presented images on a personal website in the past and referred to the display of related images as "portfolios" on the website. But I still cannot see a physical presentation of images in book form as a portfolio.

Ari
5-Dec-2016, 07:21
My impression too. I guess I am not sophisticated enough, but I am having trouble envisaging a portfolio that isn't a book where there are more than one image on a page and where some images cover two pages. Maybe the web?

When I work on a project, I rarely have 50 images, more or in the 20-30 range. Depending on the size of the prints, I just lay them on a table or the floor to arrange them. I haven't scanned my work and put it on the web.

It's not hard to imagine, see the attached photos and you'll understand what I mean.
Those are from a 2009 portfolio. The aim of the portfolio is not an end in itself, it's meant to solicit work from prospective commercial clients.
I'm not out to publish a book or sell individual prints.

faberryman
5-Dec-2016, 07:24
I was right. I am not sophisticated. Never thought of it as such.

Drew Bedo
5-Dec-2016, 07:26
When I show a prospective buyer a portfolio of prints, my intention is to sell the entire box of prints for cash and a handshake. They may want to buy fewer than all presented prints, or want them in a different size. Given that we agree on something that they do want to take home.

With all the above, I am working on a book project withimages and supporting text. It will be cool to see my work in a bound book. If I like how it comes out it will be offered for sale.

What I now understand the project in the OP to be is a sort of catalog. Is the catalog for sale?

Ari
5-Dec-2016, 07:31
What I now understand the project to be is a sort of catalog. Is the catalog for sale?

It's not a project or a catalog, Drew; it's a collection of images I had made up to that point, as are all my portfolios. There may be a theme that unifies them, but it's not imperative.
What's more important is that a certain style or way of thinking can be gleaned from viewing the work as a whole.
What's offered for sale are my services.
It's how most photographers get work, by submitting their portfolio, or "not portfolio" if you prefer calling it that.

Drew Bedo
5-Dec-2016, 07:40
Ari: Yeah . . .As George Castanza famously said,
"Its not you its ME!" I understand the concept of a themed collection or a group of related images as a portfolio. I am stumbling ver the nomenclature of the physical artifact, be it a bound volume or box of loose prints.

Please ignore about anything I've posted here and continue to do what works for you.

Cheers,

Drew Bedo

Ari
5-Dec-2016, 07:42
Ah, George Costanza, the voice of reason :)

Anyway................long story short, InDesign remains the best option for page layout.
I haven't found anything else that is as easy to use nor as geared specifically to that purpose.
Thanks for all the replies.

RSalles
5-Dec-2016, 13:34
Ari,

The same sequencing thinking about an exhibit: prints have to be viewed in a certain order, logic, or whatever, maybe date of shooting? Or subject. Ordering a portfolio is also a "cinematic" event: I just don't sequence/mix imediately after a landscape with a portrait with a still and again a landscape, or a whale and a nightscape after that... It's a better experience to "attack by different units". But if I do, there has to be a reason for that: the images are not displayed in a totally random order, never.

Tomorrow - sorry for introducing another subject in to your thread - I'll pack 3 prints for an exhibition in another city, a "collective" event, with sculptures, crayons, and more. I'll be restricted to a space where I will share it with another photographer. In this case, It doesn't make sense for me to travel there just to choose in which order this prints will be shown, as I know the same wall will be populated with very different animals,

Cheers,

Renato

Ari
5-Dec-2016, 18:32
Renato,
Sequencing is very important; I like to take the viewer on a short journey rather than look at a book of unconnected images that were put together with little or no thought.
What I do is make test prints of each photo and stick them up on my wall, two at a time; I find out which photos work well together and which ones should be alone or possibly in a group of 3 or more.
Things change again when I start planning the pages, that's where I might introduce a mini-series of 2-3 photos or decide to play around with page layout.
It's a lot of prep and work to get to a final book, but it's also a lot of fun and quite rewarding.
As for your exhibition, it may not make sense financially to travel there, but maybe there are aspects of the presentation that you can modify to your taste or vision.
People will see those three prints of yours and make an assumption or decision about you and your work based on those 3 prints; in that sense, I think no detail is too small.
Good luck with the show!

jk0592
5-Dec-2016, 19:44
Ari,
Look into Adobe FrameMaker, it is very, very powerful. I use it on MacOS via VMWare Fusion, since FrameMaker is now supported only on (help...) Windows.

Ari
5-Dec-2016, 19:47
Thanks, JK; will do!

RSalles
6-Dec-2016, 07:51
Renato,
Sequencing is very important; I like to take the viewer on a short journey rather than look at a book of unconnected images that were put together with little or no thought.
What I do is make test prints of each photo and stick them up on my wall, two at a time; I find out which photos work well together and which ones should be alone or possibly in a group of 3 or more.
Things change again when I start planning the pages, that's where I might introduce a mini-series of 2-3 photos or decide to play around with page layout.
It's a lot of prep and work to get to a final book, but it's also a lot of fun and quite rewarding.
As for your exhibition, it may not make sense financially to travel there, but maybe there are aspects of the presentation that you can modify to your taste or vision.
People will see those three prints of yours and make an assumption or decision about you and your work based on those 3 prints; in that sense, I think no detail is too small.
Good luck with the show!

Ari,

Thanks, showcasing our work is always a challenging experience. I've done 2 times this year already, a lot of congrats but but very little sales, unfortunately,

Cheers,

Renato

Jim Andrada
7-Dec-2016, 14:29
a lot of congrats but but very little sales, unfortunately

Hmmm. Sounds familiar,