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Steve Sherman
1-Nov-2016, 03:25
My wife and I had taken our granddaughters to an annual Hot Air Balloon launch about a half hour from home, we arrived @ 5:30 in the morning in anticipation of a dawn launch. Driving down the streets of Plainville CT. in the wee hours of the morning we passed this diner will all the lights off and it did not even catch my eye.

The balloon launch did not take too long and we were back on the road for a breakfast stop when we passed the Main Street Diner, or as it was that morning the Ma n Street Diner, the letter I was not lite and I thought to myself that would make a terrific photograph with a title of the Man Street Diner, a play on words in the alpha man world.

I returned on a Sunday morning some weeks later and unfortunately for my preconceived image the letters of the sign were lite on this particular morning. Nevertheless, I was there well before sunrise and the texture and ominous feel in the sky, which was going to occupy a significant portion of the final image I decided this was the morning to make my image.

In spite of giving ample exposure with reduced development to capture as much interior detail as I could, I still wished I’d given more exposure, as there is still considerable manipulation on the interior to carry off the tonalities that are in my final image. To that end, Multi-Contrast papers do provide control never before possible.

During a critique session a noted photographer asked me if I chose to keep the dark light pole in the composition on purpose, I did as I felt it added a sense of depth and dimension to the composition, which is something I strive for in most all composition. A famous illustration photographer once told me “we photographers are charged with capturing a 3 dimensional world and presenting it in a 2 dimensional photograph”. Dean Collins

5x7 Deardorff 210mm Computar lens @ f 22 @ 3 minutes N-3 PyroCat HD Extreme Minimal Agitation

Mark Sampson
1-Nov-2016, 18:18
Well done sir!

Bill_1856
1-Nov-2016, 23:39
Watch out, George Tice.

jp
2-Nov-2016, 14:36
During a critique session a noted photographer asked me if I chose to keep the dark light pole in the composition on purpose, I did as I felt it added a sense of depth and dimension to the composition, which is something I strive for in most all composition.

At some point in his urban photos Aaron Siskind often had a line at the top of bottom of the photo as a style of his own and it worked well. You having the pole along the edge works similarly.

Alan Klein
2-Nov-2016, 14:39
When my wife isn't with me, that's the kind of diner I like eating breakfast in. Nice shot.

Ulophot
5-Nov-2016, 14:38
I am posting this here because it does not qualify as a new portrait, and because this remarkable lady was a story in herself. Her name was Amelia Platts Boynton Robinson. People around the world saw her in video and photos of the most recent re-enactment of the civil rights era march over the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama. She was in a wheelchair being pushed by President Obama; she died not long after, at the age of something like one hundred and five.
In the original "Bloody Sunday" march, on March 7, 1965, she was beaten, gassed, and left for dead by the attacking state troopers. It was she who had invited Dr. Martin Luther King to Selma, much to the original worry of many people in the community, who felt that his presence would stir up trouble for them. She had already been long committed to the movement for civil rights, however, and suffered no lack courage. She and her husband were leading figures already, and her home served as an informal headquarters for the effort.
Decades later, she became a leader in the international Schiller Institute, through which she toured the world speaking for dialogue, peace, and economic development, and it was in this capacity that my wife and I got to know her. On one of her visits to the Washington area in 1990 for speaking engagements and meetings, we had the honor of having her at our home for dinner. I had let her know that I wanted to make a portrait of her when she came, although she seemed a little surprised when she saw the camera and light set up. She was, as always, perfectly gracious, and sat for the portrait.
For any interested, her biography, Bridge Over Jordan, was published by the Institute in 1991.

157046

bloodhoundbob
5-Nov-2016, 14:44
I am posting this here because it does not qualify as a new portrait, and because this remarkable lady was a story in herself. Her name was Amelia Platts Boynton Robinson. People around the world saw her in video and photos of the most recent re-enactment of the civil rights era march over the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama. She was in a wheelchair being pushed by President Obama; she died not long after, at the age of something like one hundred and five.
In the original "Bloody Sunday" march, on March 7, 1965, she was beaten, gassed, and left for dead by the attacking state troopers. It was she who had invited Dr. Martin Luther King to Selma, much to the original worry of many people in the community, who felt that his presence would stir up trouble for them. She had already been long committed to the movement for civil rights, however, and suffered no lack courage. She and her husband were leading figures already, and her home served as an informal headquarters for the effort.
Decades later, she became a leader in the international Schiller Institute, through which she toured the world speaking for dialogue, peace, and economic development, and it was in this capacity that my wife and I got to know her. On one of her visits to the Washington area in 1990 for speaking engagements and meetings, we had the honor of having her at our home for dinner. I had let her know that I wanted to make a portrait of her when she came, although she seemed a little surprised when she saw the camera and light set up. She was, as always, perfectly gracious, and sat for the portrait.
For any interested, her biography, Bridge Over Jordan, was published by the Institute in 1991.

157046

What an excellent portrait of a wonderful lady!

Jac@stafford.net
5-Nov-2016, 14:44
Because the title is The Story Behind Every Photograph I hope a miniature format is okay. The photo requires a caption/explanation.

My mother died a few years ago. Her great grandchildren spread her ashes where she asked, in the mountains of Colorado. This is one of mother's great grandchildren doing just that. I cannot unsee the halo.

157051

Venita A. Jalbert: RIP