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View Full Version : How Is This Achieved - Apparently Elevated Perspective



IanBarber
9-Oct-2016, 13:10
Over the last few years, I have been collecting photographs which were made by a local photographer during the early 1900's

One part of his composition have always struck me as been interesting and that is when people are in the scene, they always appear to be lower in the scene ( not at the camera level)

I can only think that he was stood on a large box but surely, they had enough weight to carry round without having to resort to carrying boxes.

Looking at the camera he used, I see no rise/fall as well.

I am also seeing similarities in other photographers work around that era

Any other thoughts on how he did this.

155973

155972

155974

Peter Gomena
9-Oct-2016, 13:22
Photographs from opening day of the 1905 Lewis & Clark Exposition in Portland, OR, show two or three photographers on very tall ladders using 8x10" cameras on very tall tripods. Your photographer wasn't up that high, but may well have been working from the back of a wagon.

IanBarber
9-Oct-2016, 13:26
I never thought of that. i am wondering now if they used a horse and cart to transport the eqipment around with them in which case they had a platform to work from

Dan Fromm
9-Oct-2016, 13:40
A little front rise will do that too. In y'r third picture, the lens seems to be above the camera's optical axis. In other words, his rig has front rise built in.

ic-racer
9-Oct-2016, 13:44
You can tell the exact location of the camera lens by the converging horizontal lines. In both cases the lens seems to be at the level of the head of the people in the picture. As Dan pointed out, nice front rise trick on the camera. Camera 'position' is usually the position of the lens and framing is by position of the negative. As long as the lens does not move in 3D space, the perspective and object relationships remain unchanged in spite of all other camera movements.

Vaughn
9-Oct-2016, 14:20
Looks like he had the camera slightly pointed downwards in both images.

Jim Jones
9-Oct-2016, 15:59
Here is one of the ways Darius Kinsey did it: https://www.whatcommuseum.org/v/vex3/C99325A5-DBDE-4E51-8361-851758438228.htm.

Randy Moe
9-Oct-2016, 18:38
Here is one of the ways Darius Kinsey did it: https://www.whatcommuseum.org/v/vex3/C99325A5-DBDE-4E51-8361-851758438228.htm.

Nice link!

And correct method of capture.

Doremus Scudder
10-Oct-2016, 01:03
You can tell the exact location of the camera lens by the converging horizontal lines. In both cases the lens seems to be at the level of the head of the people in the picture. As Dan pointed out, nice front rise trick on the camera. Camera 'position' is usually the position of the lens and framing is by position of the negative. As long as the lens does not move in 3D space, the perspective and object relationships remain unchanged in spite of all other camera movements.

Exactly! The line that is parallel to the horizontal frame of the photograph is the line of the optical center and shows the height of the lens. In the first picture this is easy to see on the bricks of the left wall. In the second, there are no bricks, but the position of the parallel is pretty easy to estimate. In both cases, this parallel line is about head-high (a comfortable viewing height) and below the center of the photo, indicating that front rise was used. The verticals in the photos look pretty parallel to me as well, indicating that the camera back was plumb. No big secrets here.

Best,

Doremus

dave_whatever
10-Oct-2016, 01:42
I would say just use of front rise too.

However, using a camera on a tall tripod or platform and the photographer standing on a stepladder would not be unheard of either.

http://classconnection.s3.amazonaws.com/367/flashcards/1301367/jpg/1947_ansel_adams_car_roof1337296850180.jpg

DrTang
10-Oct-2016, 07:17
the bottom one looks like he is on a rise or hill..or even a porch, the top one looks roughly level with the street with the lens placement giving a slight rise

Jim Jones
10-Oct-2016, 07:18
Improvising a suitable mount for the camera atop the stepladder is simpler than using stepladder plus tripod.

Randy Moe
10-Oct-2016, 07:47
Improvising a suitable mount for the camera atop the stepladder is simpler than using stepladder plus tripod.

Now why didn't I think of that...

After all I do have a 10 ft painting pole with a 1/4-20 bolt for small cameras.

Jerry Bodine
10-Oct-2016, 10:20
I've posted this photo before, but every time the subject of a high viewpoint is brought up I think of it again.

Dan Fromm
10-Oct-2016, 12:42
I'm not sure that's very high, Jerry. I attended a professional meeting in La Paz, BCS, in 2000. A local pro was contracted to take the group photo. He shot us, massed on one side of a plaza, from the roof of a four story building on the other side of the plaza. I can't report how the shot turned out, participants never got copies. I suspect a major catastrophe somewhere between fresh film in the box and processed film in the darkroom.

IanBarber
10-Oct-2016, 13:02
Today I went into but didn't have a box or ladders so I cheated and walked onto the roof of the car park

156013

Fomapan 100
Kodak HC-110
Chamonix 4x5 & 90mm lens

Greg
11-Oct-2016, 16:34
Back in the 1980s we rented a Linhof Heavy Duty tripod whose bottom legs were probably X3 or X4 the length of the normal chrome bottom OEM legs. Center post was raised all the way up (possibly with an extension). I'm guessing the top of the tripod was 12 feet above the ground. Was actually a very, very stable. Working with the Sinar mounted way up that high was a challenge since I was standing/balancing atop a way less stable step ladder. Soon after that purchased a normal Linhof Heavy Duty tripod with center column. Still have and use it with an 800mm Nikkor and a Questar.

Kirk Gittings
11-Oct-2016, 18:29
I don't have a snap handy with my VC on this, though I use it often on this tripod.
https://scontent-lax3-1.xx.fbcdn.net/v/t1.0-9/12039411_10207810139321398_204728454053541131_n.jpg?oh=17e08655be1ccb72e73acc6f1baee4f4&oe=5868A5CE

Alan Gales
11-Oct-2016, 18:43
I've posted this photo before, but every time the subject of a high viewpoint is brought up I think of it again.

I've used these in construction. They are a whole lot safer!

https://www.google.com/search?q=JLG&biw=1680&bih=939&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwixp-O0kdTPAhWMxYMKHQQ7BeIQsAQIPw&dpr=1#imgrc=xxY-01mMDIStzM%3A

Cor
18-Oct-2016, 06:23
I personally do not find the perceptive that odd, but I am 1.92 m tall, and I like to have my LF camera at eye level, so I do not have to stoop..;-)..

Best,

Cor

K. Praslowicz
23-Nov-2016, 12:58
Here is one of the ways Darius Kinsey did it: https://www.whatcommuseum.org/v/vex3/C99325A5-DBDE-4E51-8361-851758438228.htm.

Damn. Now my tripod that only takes a small step ladder to get to the top off makes me feel inadequate.

https://c41.kpraslowicz.com/media/fitpost-narrow/2016-10-19/ice-caves.jpg?v=1.0.5