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tgtaylor
3-Sep-2016, 14:16
Post the snaps you made while out hiking - any size forms is at will do. This snap was taken in Patagonia's Torre del Paine National Park while hiking to the Grey Glacier:

https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8819/29399413736_55c2cb538a.jpg

Pentax K1000.

Thomas

Maris Rusis
3-Sep-2016, 14:49
https://c2.staticflickr.com/2/1627/25337935584_6fec46e21c_b.jpg
Terminal Moraine, Blue Lake Cirque

Gelatin-silver photograph on Ultrafine Silver Eagle VC FB photographic paper, image size 16.5cm X 21.4cm, from a Kodak Tmax 100 negative exposed in a Mamiya RB67 single lens reflex camera fitted with a 360mm f6.3 lens The larger rocks in this boulder field are the size of a double-decker bus. Glacial ice moved them easily. Walking through this area is not so easy.

Vaughn
3-Sep-2016, 15:20
These are some previously posted images taken while backpacking.
1) My shadow and Western Juniper on Shell Mountain on my 60th birthday (Rolleicord, platinum/palladium print)
2) Looking up Redwood Creek (5x7, negative scan and inversed in PhotoShop)
3) Mistaking the Map for the Territory, from on top of Sentinel Dome (4x5, 16x20 Silver Gelatin Print). One can backpack here when Glacier Point Road is closed.
4) Redwood, Dolason Creek, Redwood National Park (4x5 Carbon Print)

Vaughn
3-Sep-2016, 15:26
And some general photos of me hiking and/or backpacking:
1) Many years ago -- in my lederhosen in the North Cascades...Glacier Peak in the back. Pre-photo days...wish I still had those monster legs!
2) Day-hiking with my boys and the 8x10 above Yosemite Valley (to an unnamed waterfall)
3) Day hike up Fern Canyon with the Rolleicord, Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park
4) Recent backpack trip up Redwood Creek (took my 4x5)...me feeding the fire in the rain.

tgtaylor
3-Sep-2016, 19:20
Me on top of Mather Pass - camera pointed south:

https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8158/29358619841_618984c6c3.jpg

About an hour before this was taken, I fell off the snow-covered north side and slid down about 100 meters before self-arresting in the soft afternoon snow.

Pentax K1000.

Thomas

Corran
3-Sep-2016, 21:38
Wow, that's quite a fall!!!

I went hiking today in the north GA mountains, on part of the Appalachian Trail. Specifically, the Woody Gap trail to "Preachers Rock." On the way I found this nice scene:

Shen-Hao PTB-617, 72mm XL + 2x CF, Tri-X, Rodinal 1:50

http://www.oceanstarproductions.com/photosharing/preachersrock-3987ss.jpg

tgtaylor
4-Sep-2016, 00:57
Thanks Corran. That happened a few years back and after a little reflection it was more like 50 feet - 100' at tops. I had fallen downhill head first on my back with all my gear on which, back in those days, was upwards of 50 lbs, and without thinking about it flipped over and got my head pointed uphill and self-arrested digging the toes of the boots and fingers into the soft snow. I would have went down about 100 meters or so to where the slope leveled off if it was early morning when the snow would have been frozen, but even then I would have been unhurt as there were no protruding objects along the path. It sure sent the adrenlin through the roof and my heart was pounding away as I made it back to where I was.

Here's a late afternoon/early evening view from my campsite north of Muir Pass in Evolution Basin, Kings Canyon NP:

https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8352/29334695652_7890b601e1_z.jpg

Pentax K1000.

Thomas

Vaughn
4-Sep-2016, 08:32
Very nice, Bryan!
Thomas -- love that area...especially Dusy Basin. What a place for thunderstorms...the thunder rolls around that basin and shakes your insides! The last time I was there must have been 1973, maybe '74.

Probably 90% of my photographs are taken while hiking (further than 1/2 mile from the road, or hiking around for more than an hour) with the exception of the 11x14 camera.

Chester McCheeserton
4-Sep-2016, 13:00
Pear Lake, Sequoia National Park, from last June.

Wista/Zone 6 4x5. Schneider Apo Symmar 135mm. Fuji quickload NPS expiration date 2005..


154596

tgtaylor
4-Sep-2016, 22:20
Interesting area Chester. I haven't done much hiking out of TH on the western side but the hike out to Pear Lake looks interesting. I'm going to put that on my list.

Vaughn: I've been to Dusy Basin many times - usually continuing over to the TH out or down to LeConte Canyon on the way in. But a couple of times I got a late start out of Bishop and camped in Dusy. Here is an image shot out of the door of my tent at sundown:

https://c2.staticflickr.com/8/7750/29177757450_dcff9e8e27_z.jpg

It's a little blury due to the shutter speed - probably 1/8 second or even less - and in those days I never used a tripod or a cable release. Pentax K1000.

Thomas

monotux
4-Sep-2016, 22:41
Any format? Even digital? ;)

I'm pretty new to all this hiking but I really like it. I recently climbed the highest peak in the country (which isn't very high) and brought my DSLR with me, some pictures below. I brought my Texas Leica with me as well but not up to the top.

Visibility was...limited. For 7 of the total 13 hours of walking up and down.

https://c5.staticflickr.com/9/8341/28674500444_c5d520502a_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/KFSiYG)

https://c5.staticflickr.com/9/8099/28674497764_01568504c8_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/KFSibu)

The day after:

https://c8.staticflickr.com/9/8122/29296969055_524f5a7f3a_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/LCSCd8)

Beyond that I've only been out hiking twice before, but I have a long time ahead of me (I'm only 30) to explore this hobby.

scheinfluger_77
5-Sep-2016, 06:46
That first one is fascinating. What is with all the cairns?

Vaughn
5-Sep-2016, 08:17
...Beyond that I've only been out hiking twice before, but I have a long time ahead of me (I'm only 30) to explore this hobby.
You have plenty of time to enjoy it! The fog image is fun!

Steve -- balancing rocks is the new thing (well, not brand new). Can be very obnoxious when done in heavily visited areas. A way for people to yell, "I have been here!", or perhaps "I am so bored with all this nature stuff. What can I do to make my mark on the land?" A new twist to the wilderness ethic of "Take only pictures, leave only footprints -- and a bunch of arty rock piles." I am not a fan of it -- I even try to minimize my footprints I leave behind.

monotux
5-Sep-2016, 11:34
You have plenty of time to enjoy it! The fog image is fun!

Thanks!


That first one is fascinating. What is with all the cairns?


Steve -- balancing rocks is the new thing (well, not brand new). Can be very obnoxious when done in heavily visited areas. A way for people to yell, "I have been here!", or perhaps "I am so bored with all this nature stuff. What can I do to make my mark on the land?" A new twist to the wilderness ethic of "Take only pictures, leave only footprints -- and a bunch of arty rock piles." I am not a fan of it -- I even try to minimize my footprints I leave behind.

The stone piles (cairns?) in this case are located after a long, steep climb (obviously, it's a mountain...) before a decline and another long, steep climb before reaching the peak. We were pretty surprised seeing the amount of cairns on the first peak, but on our way back from the peak we made a pile ourselves.

David Schaller
5-Sep-2016, 15:47
You have plenty of time to enjoy it! The fog image is fun!

Steve -- balancing rocks is the new thing (well, not brand new). Can be very obnoxious when done in heavily visited areas. A way for people to yell, "I have been here!", or perhaps "I am so bored with all this nature stuff. What can I do to make my mark on the land?" A new twist to the wilderness ethic of "Take only pictures, leave only footprints -- and a bunch of arty rock piles." I am not a fan of it -- I even try to minimize my footprints I leave behind.

I'm with you on this Vaughn! That picture above shows the ridiculous lengths to which this fad is going.

ckagy
5-Sep-2016, 16:25
154645

Taken on a hike along Donaldson Run in Arlington, VA. There are a surprising number of wooded trails in the immediate environs of Arlington/Washington DC.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

Two23
5-Sep-2016, 19:39
Recently returned from a trip through Glacier NP/Banff/Jasper Park/Edmonton/Saskatchawan. Most of my photos were taken with Nikon DSLR, but I always bring a vintage film camera too. This time it was a 1937 Voigtlander Bessa RF with a Heliar lens. Love that Heliar! First shot is of Waterton Lake, Alberta. second shot is of the Great Falls of the Missouri River (Montana.) Third was done with Nikon DSLR using the 24mm shift lens, along Icefield Parkway, Alberta. It's a 3-shot pano. These are surprisingly easy to do with a shift lens. Wish Nikon made more than just three of these lenses. We didn't make any of the silly rock piles, but I'll say their better than carving the trees.


Kent in SD

Vaughn
5-Sep-2016, 19:43
From the Wayback machine!!!

I must have taken this in 1979. I hiked the university's Linhof monorail in its aluminum case (strapped to the top of my Kelty external frame backpack) and some big old pod about 8 miles up the trail to Canyon Creek Lakes, Trinity Alps. Then hiked straight up the mountain from the lakes another 1000 feet or so (at about 6700') for this image of Thompson Peak (9003')...looking roughly north.

The photo is a recent platinum print of that old neg -- just a rough print to judge contrast, etc -- not too pretty of a print, but will work on it more one of these days.

Thompson Peak is second from the left. On another trip I hiked up to the ridge between Wedding Cake Peak (first on the left) and Thompson, but just with the Rolleiflex. Minor frostbite on my hands as I made my way down from the ridge -- had to visually check my finger-holds as I could not feel my hands anymore. It was so nice and warm on the west side, but oh so cold as the wind blew over the snow upwards on the shaded east side!

tgtaylor
5-Sep-2016, 21:15
Lookin' Back - The John Muir Trail

https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8459/29490975565_28f3ff3e14_z.jpg

What a great hiking trail! Pentax K1000.

Thomas

tgtaylor
6-Sep-2016, 14:34
Taboose Pass (?)

https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8419/29507056345_60067c3a63_z.jpg

I don't recall with certainity where this is but I think it is the Taboose Pass entrance into Kings Canyon NP. Pentax K1000.

Thomas

PS: It's Taboose Pass.

Drew Wiley
6-Sep-2016, 16:05
Egad, Taboose? !! Wonder if I'll ever make it up that oven climb at my age? Lake Basin is still on my bucket list. For those of you not in the "know", Taboose is one of the "Fearsome Foursome" passes of the east side of the southern Sierra. It begins in desert and climbs about 7000 feet to the actual pass. I've always opted for the easier passes that start high to begin with, like Kearsarge, Bishop, or Army, though I have done my share of strenuous off-trail approaches, like Lamarck Col. In the background you can see Arrow Peak. Lake Basin would be toward theright, off the current trail behind those ridges. In between is the canyon, Muro Blanco, itself untrailed but doable if you don't mind a lot of brush. But your previouspic, Thomas, looks a lot more like the vicinity of Chocolate Peak, looking east on the way up to Bishop Pass, and not along the Muir Trail. Am I right?

Drew Wiley
6-Sep-2016, 16:12
... I just noticed your post of Evolution Basin too. Sapphire Lake with those two peaks in the background was the first color image I ever printed myself. It came
out surprisingly well, although the chrome was upside-down in the carrier and the image reversed. I printed a dawn shot of Clyde Minaret the same day, in the correct orientation after I scratched my head about the prior image.

Amfooty
6-Sep-2016, 17:47
Waterfalls of Ordesa y Monte Period National Park. Hasselblad Xpan, 45mm, Foma 100

https://c7.staticflickr.com/9/8238/29193722750_2bad612aac_h.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/LtKsFq)Ordesa (https://flic.kr/p/LtKsFq) by Alex C (https://www.flickr.com/photos/104349761@N02/), on Flickr

Corran
6-Sep-2016, 23:27
Hiked to Springer Mountain, the Southern Terminus of the Appalachian Trail today (see my thread in the Location & Travel subforum).

Here's a few pictures from the day. All taken with my Nikon SP 2005 and Voigtlander 15mm f/4.5 lens, on T-Max 100 dev'd in FX-39:

http://www.oceanstarproductions.com/photosharing/springermtn-4092ss.jpg

http://www.oceanstarproductions.com/photosharing/springermtn-4095ss.jpg

http://www.oceanstarproductions.com/photosharing/springermtn-4096ss.jpg

Henrim
7-Sep-2016, 00:12
Couple of iphone/instagram shots from my hike last July. Enonteki÷, Lapland, Finland.

Ray Van Nes
7-Sep-2016, 12:58
Thought I would throw my hat in the ring. Here is an image of me on King's Creek Ridge in Kananaskis - that's in Canada - eh. It shows me with my Graflex Century which is a work horse. Getting up there is a grunt as it has over 700m (2300 ft.) with no switchbacks. I have also hauled my 4x5 Chamonix up there along with a 6 x12 back. I have yet to produce an image I am totally satisfied with on that ridge although it is quite spectacular ,especially early summer when there is still snow on the peaks behind. I have series which is based on being up high called Icelines and Ridgelines which is on my website www.rayvannesphotography.com 154769

tgtaylor
9-Sep-2016, 08:48
Cuernos del Paine from Lake Pehoe - Torres del Paine National Park, Patagonia.

http://spiritsofsilver.com/yahoo_site_admin/assets/images/Cuernos_del_Paine_from_Lake_Pehoe.25292820_large.jpg

I hired a motor craft in Puerto Natales to drop me off at the parks boundary and hiked ~ 13 or so miles into the park. This was the scenery as I approached Lake Pehoe. Pentax 67II.

Thomas

tgtaylor
11-Sep-2016, 20:13
Flowers & Rock - The John Muir Trail.

https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8045/29622368135_0d6035d1a2.jpg

Hugging the very last step down when decending Mather Pass. I believe that the rock is potasium feldspar which gives it the pinkish color. Pentax K1000.

Thomas

stawastawa
12-Sep-2016, 22:10
This third one (an oak?) is wild. and wonderfully dynamic. much to find in that image.
amazing retention of highlights. Is the FX-39 doing that? or Tonal compression from digitizing?


Hiked to Springer Mountain, the Southern Terminus of the Appalachian Trail today (see my thread in the Location & Travel subforum).

Here's a few pictures from the day. All taken with my Nikon SP 2005 and Voigtlander 15mm f/4.5 lens, on T-Max 100 dev'd in FX-39:

http://www.oceanstarproductions.com/photosharing/springermtn-4096ss.jpg

Corran
12-Sep-2016, 22:23
Thanks! Yes I've had pretty good results with FX-39 in retaining highlights. This is a fairly straight scan, not much done to it.

In the FX-39 information, it says FX-39 was specifically developed for T-grain films and that it "does not compress midtones." I haven't done anything like rigorous analysis of densities but it definitely seems to give T-grain films a bit more snap. That and Acufine are my favorite developers (Acufine for traditional films).

austin granger
12-Sep-2016, 22:50
Yes, that's me, about a week ago, atop Middle Sister in central Oregon. It was a pretty tough slog. I wouldn't have made it with a view camera, that's for sure.

https://c5.staticflickr.com/9/8119/28905712644_90bc57d183_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/L3ikiW)Atop Middle Sister, Oregon (https://flic.kr/p/L3ikiW) by Austin Granger (https://www.flickr.com/photos/austingranger/), on Flickr

jose angel
13-Sep-2016, 01:06
Visibility was...limited. For 7 of the total 13 hours of walking up and down.
https://c5.staticflickr.com/9/8099/28674497764_01568504c8_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/KFSibu)
Monotux, I`d maybe soften a bit the bottom right corner. Anyway, a very nice image. It`d fit perfectly over the sofa in my living... :D

scheinfluger_77
13-Sep-2016, 04:43
You have plenty of time to enjoy it! The fog image is fun!

Steve -- balancing rocks is the new thing (well, not brand new). Can be very obnoxious when done in heavily visited areas. A way for people to yell, "I have been here!", or perhaps "I am so bored with all this nature stuff. What can I do to make my mark on the land?" A new twist to the wilderness ethic of "Take only pictures, leave only footprints -- and a bunch of arty rock piles." I am not a fan of it -- I even try to minimize my footprints I leave behind.
Vaughn, that's why this caught my eye, I have never seen such a collection. And it seems like such a weird thing to do. I'm used to seeing them singly as trail markers or hiding places for the registry often found at the top of tall peaks. A common occurrence in Colorado.

Henrim
13-Sep-2016, 07:30
One of the 6x12 frames from my hike in July 2015.

A view to mount (fell) Tierbmesvarri, Enonteki÷, Finland.
Toyo field (4 3/4 x 6 1/2), 6x12 back, SA 90mm, Ilford Delta 100

http://melaanvuo.com/share/insta/tierbmesvarri.jpg

Drew Wiley
13-Sep-2016, 10:01
Thomas. Just noted your Mather Pass photo. Hard to see the detail, but that looks more like an oxidation surface on quartz monzonite granite rather than feldspar, which wouldn't share that salt and pepper pattern, but usually occurs in think pinkish veins in that area. Pretty just the same. My mtn gear is all cleaned and repacked for next season already, along with the little Ebony folder. And I've already got some wannabee "trainees" to accompany me on the shorter tune-up trips
in the high country next summer. Longer trips need more experienced companions, since they tend to get into rough off-trail terrain. I still feel great at higher
altitudes, but need longer rest after a "death march" than when I was younger, and a lighter pack too!

mmerig
13-Sep-2016, 22:47
. . . but that looks more like an oxidation surface on quartz monzonite granite rather than feldspar, which wouldn't share that salt and pepper pattern, but usually occurs in think pinkish veins in that area.

Quartz monzonite has a lot of feldspar (roughly 80% or more), of which about half-and-half is plagioclase and orthoclase feldspar (the latter is a type of potassium feldspar or "K-spar" for short). So calling that rock "potassium feldspar" is not too far off the mark, because K-spars can be pink. Rocks such as granite are composed of minerals such as feldspar, so saying "granite rather than feldspar" is like saying "cookie rather than sugar".

Strictly speaking, granite and quartz monzonite are different types of rock, according to common classification systems (e.g., Streckeisen's), but many casually lump them together as "granite". Ironically, granite has more quartz than quartz monzonite (but quartz monzonite has more quartz than plain old monzonite, so it all makes sense). The "pepper" Drew mentions is probably hornblende, black mica (biotite), or other dark mineral; these could be in granite or quartz monzonite as well as other rocks. Many of the famous granite mountains are actually quartz monzonite.

The pinkish veins in the Sierra (and other places) is pegmatite, and it's main minerals can be similar to granite or quartz monzonite, but the distinguishing feature is that the crystals are big, due to slow cooling as they were intruded into cracks within the surrounding rocks.

This is a ways off-topic, but the statement about feldpars etc. was way-off, and worth a little effort to correct.

monotux
13-Sep-2016, 23:16
Monotux, I`d maybe soften a bit the bottom right corner. Anyway, a very nice image. It`d fit perfectly over the sofa in my living... :D
If you want a copy I can send you a processed tif? I might have some computer time tomorrow evening (local time here is morning).

Rael
14-Sep-2016, 03:47
Vaughn, that's why this caught my eye, I have never seen such a collection. And it seems like such a weird thing to do. I'm used to seeing them singly as trail markers or hiding places for the registry often found at the top of tall peaks. A common occurrence in Colorado.

It was completely out of control on Marginal Way in Maine - so much so that they outlawed it. Rightfully so, in my opinion.

Here's a little YashicaMAT shot from Bearpen Mountain in the Catskills. Some kind of weird scratch/marks across the top edge that I hadn't noticed until now. Odd!

https://c6.staticflickr.com/6/5816/22789579149_d1b5614158_b.jpg

Martin Aislabie
14-Sep-2016, 09:02
One of the 6x12 frames from my hike in July 2015.

A view to mount (fell) Tierbmesvarri, Enonteki÷, Finland.
Toyo field (4 3/4 x 6 1/2), 6x12 back, SA 90mm, Ilford Delta 100

http://melaanvuo.com/share/insta/tierbmesvarri.jpg

Fabulous

What time of day was this ?

Martin

Drew Wiley
14-Sep-2016, 10:06
Well as you probably already know, MMERIG, "granite" is the blanket term for the primary plutonic material of the Sierras per se, and the most common type is
quartz black n' white salt n' pepper quartz monzonite. I have a geology background myself, and at one time my father bought out leading commercial quarry to this stuff, while it was temporarily out of business. Beyond that, there are infinite nuances of the term granite, both casual and specific. I just returned from a long backpack trip which involved a brief stay at Porphyry Lake, which has several thousand acres of huge beach-ball like inclusions of black andesite in a matrix of typical salt n' pepper monzonite; but also random examples of things more tempting to color film like olivine or concentrated pink feldspar. I took one such shot with all the above in direct proximity, plus some reddish surface oxidation due to water and bacteria once running through a crack. Olivine also tends to form in cracks, at times re-depositing as stunning fern-like pseudo-fossils. We built our well pump-house out of examples of this! I still think the picture in question was an example of surface oxidation rather than feldspar concentration, but of course could be wrong because it's hard to see detail over the web. Our
resident igneous & plutonic expert here at work is off on vacation, no doubt to lava tubes or something like that. I'm was more trained in geomorphology. But we both share a fair amt of paleontology training. Specific feldspars themselves can not always be correctly identified strictly by eyesight. That much I know. Things
get insanely complicated in the vicinity of roof pendant geology, which in fact is a major element in various Sierra sub-ranges (one reason we locals referred to
them as "Sierras" in the plural), yet the constituent of many of its most most dramatic peaks.

Drew Wiley
14-Sep-2016, 10:20
What did I forget... Oh, that pink plagioclase feldspars frequently get extruded into large veins in the Sierra, often in the vicinity of wide milk quartz veins. More
color film fodder, exp in the rain. And this pattern is the identifying feature of certain dramatic landmarks like Striped Peak. The more tangled things get, the more
miners were attracted to the locale, primarily for gold and tungsten; but platinum and palladium were also extracted by the biggest mines. If someone wants a
dramatic geological "mess" within dayhiking distance, with caves n' karst thrown in to boot, the Mineral King area offers it all.

mmerig
14-Sep-2016, 18:59
[QUOTE=Drew Wiley;1351377]Well as you probably already know, MMERIG, "granite" is the blanket term for the primary plutonic material of the Sierras per se, and the most common type is quartz black n' white salt n' pepper quartz monzonite.

Regarding a "blanket term", I say as much in my previous message about the casual term "granite". Of course it's fine to call the predominant rock in the Sierra's granite, but when getting more specific about minerals and rock types, as you did, we should try to be accurate, even if most LFPF readers may be interested in just pictures and photography. But maybe some LFPF folks are especially interested in natural features in the pictures, and a separate forum to cover them could be appropriate -- just a thought.

This is all I am going to say about it.

Henrim
15-Sep-2016, 05:22
Fabulous

What time of day was this ?

Martin

Thanks! That was taken at the evening, can't recall the exact time. The sun is pretty low allthough it never sets that time of the year at that latitude.

Martin Aislabie
15-Sep-2016, 05:35
Thanks! That was taken at the evening, can't recall the exact time. The sun is pretty low allthough it never sets that time of the year at that latitude.

Thanks

Martin

Drew Wiley
15-Sep-2016, 09:45
Yes, guilty as charged. I'm using layman's language, generic "granite". Even pegmatite is a blanket term for slow-cooled big crystals and not a specific mineralogical identification. I had an amazing contrast of flavors even in my front yard - incredibly hard purple-brown diorite boulders in long parallel dikes, typically about a quarter mile apart, with salt n' pepper granite in between, but overlayed with Pliocene river terrace deposits containing all kinds of rocks. Huge Pliocene basalt flows were in the vicinity, plus earlier Pliocene fossiliferous sandstone layers below that. My parents ashes are buried below their favorite garden rock, a diorite "book" with bronze plaques symmetrically mounted, just like adjacent pages to an open book. The tops of the rocks contain many Indian acorn grinding holes. I eventually had to sell the property just due to the sheer amount of constant maintenance, especially the constant brush and weed control in forest fire country. Then you've got all these countertop dealers around here, with all kinds of flavors of big crystal granite that don't resemble anything we in'
the Sierra called granite. My wife picked out a slab of Iranian granite that is almost jade colored. ... one more remodel project I haven't completed yet.

Drew Wiley
15-Sep-2016, 10:00
Oh, added to that topic.... One evening on my last trip we were camped right at the edge of a vista overlooking three different forks of the Merced, and could see in a single sweep both where the specific glaciers once was which John Muir's advocacy of the glacial origin of Yosemite Valley, and where we could see the distinct vertical differences on the main canyon wall which gave Matthes the clue to the possible number of major glaciations themselves. Highest up, the granite has been long oxidized and is subtly yet distinctly reddish, while furthest down and youngest, you still have bright whitish salt n' pepper granite, along with intact patches of striated glacial polish. Otherwise, all the same kind of predominant granite. Of course, there are all kinds of glacial erratics laying around - basaltic, metamorphic, dark andesites, etc - another distinct clue to major glacial activity. Whitney denied the whole premise.

tgtaylor
15-Sep-2016, 10:39
These snaps were taken while hiking Crete's Samaria Gorge on a bicyle trip through Crete and mainland Greece:

The Gates

https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8458/29619956301_dddedddd80.jpg

The sides of the gorge rise to just under 1000' and narrow to a mere 4 meters apart.

Abandoned Castle or Village of Samaria

https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8355/29410388900_cfa52bbbf3.jpg

Just inside the gorge which was inhabited until 1962 when it became a national park.

Village of Agia Roumeli

https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8268/29410304680_4a099fdf73.jpg

This is the terminus of the hike on the Libyan Sea where you catch the ferry back to Chania - a picturesque 1 hour boat ride. The hike is about 10 miles in length and I would rate it a moderate if you're in decent shape. All photos were taken with a Pentax K1000. For more info on the Gorge, see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samari%C3%A1_Gorge

Thomas

Corran
15-Sep-2016, 19:48
Thomas that gorge is a neat location. Never heard of it before but looks like a great place to shoot.

From a couple of days ago, more of the same - Appalachian Trail, 15mm, etc.:

http://www.oceanstarproductions.com/photosharing/3forks-4147ss.jpg

tgtaylor
16-Sep-2016, 11:38
If you find yourself in Crete and have the time, I highly recommend it. I took the overnight ferry to Heraklion and bicycled Crete clockwise following the coast where possible. When I got to Chania I rented a room and took this trip. Here are a few more snaps from the hike:

You start out high in the White Mountains and head downhill downhill to Agia Roumeli on the coast:

https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8329/29722086385_d0746cea03.jpg

https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8078/29722210575_ba178fdd18.jpg

https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8112/29641361211_5822083edc.jpg

At Agia Roumeli you catch the ferry back. Here is a view of a scenic Libyan Sea coastal village you pass by on the return:

https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8511/29687304996_0bf162170f.jpg

Thomas

tgtaylor
20-Sep-2016, 11:07
Egad, Taboose? !! But your previouspic, Thomas, looks a lot more like the vicinity of Chocolate Peak, looking east on the way up to Bishop Pass, and not along the Muir Trail. Am I right?

It took me about 2 weeks to figure out your post Drew - "previouspic" was throwing me. I didn't know if you were talking about the Taboose Pass image or what. I got it figure out now: The "previouspic" was taken looking back to the north on the climb out of Evolution Basin while heading south. It's a terrific view and justifies humping a large camera up there for a mural-size print.

The Pacific Crest Trail is America's preeminent hiking trail, The JMT is the best part of the PCT.

Thomas

diversey
20-Sep-2016, 11:34
I wen to hike on the Cavell Meadows Trail in Jasper National Park, Alberta in September 6 and saw a guy who were using a large format camera (4x5?) in trailhead parking lot. However I could not find him after I parked my car. Below are some iPhone photos I took during this hiking. Cavell Meadows Trail is a nice one, don't miss it when you visit Jasper National Park.

155226 155227 155228 155229

Vaughn
20-Sep-2016, 15:14
My brother and I at Shadow Lake last week. We did not make it much further -- both my brother (heart) and his dog were not up for the hike, so we just spent the night out and headed back out the next day. We did have a short snow storm to make the afternoon grand!

h2oman
20-Sep-2016, 19:27
Where's Shadow Lake? Trinity Alps?

Vaughn
20-Sep-2016, 20:58
Where's Shadow Lake? Trinity Alps?
No...right out of Agnew Meadows, near Mammoth Lakes, CA -- eastside Sierras. Right next door to Devil's Postpile NM. About a 500 miles drive for what ended up being an over-night hike!

tgtaylor
21-Sep-2016, 10:12
Vaughn,

Did you take the shuttle down from ML or drive in? Any mosquitoes?

Thomas

Vaughn
21-Sep-2016, 10:25
Shuttle does not operate after Labor Day, so we drove to the Agnew Meadow Traihead. No bugs -- except for always present big black ants (with a few flying ones). It has been dipping just below freezing at night.

I was surprised at the number of dogs on the trail.

tgtaylor
21-Sep-2016, 10:33
Did they charge you a fee to drive in? I've read that you either take the shuttle or pay a $10 fee to drive in.

Thomas

Drew Wiley
21-Sep-2016, 11:16
They don't want the narrow road clogged, so you basically have to drive in or back out at night, when the shuttle is not operating, or else off-season. If there's a fee, it's more likely related to parking. I always hated that damn shuttle. You pick it up at the ski resort parking lot, then don't get to the trailhead until late morning, then gotta catch it in time in the late afternoon if you don't want to get stuck at the trailhead all night. Funny, but just five minutes ago I was talking with our resident igneous expert, who has just returned from a vacation at Lava Beds, and was telling him about Black Point on my own vacation, which is basically just
like Devil's Postpile - fairly recent (Pleistocene), relatively unweathered columnar basalt, but the entire formation completely tipped on the horizontal.

Vaughn
21-Sep-2016, 12:45
There was a fee, but free with one's OGP (Old Gezzer Pass).

While the shuttle is running, one can drive down in the early morning before the gate folks are there and park down at the TH.

Drew Wiley
21-Sep-2016, 13:00
I'd like to hit up some of my secret places again. A funny thing about that country is that, although locations on the main trails are highly popular, you can be just a mile off trail with nobody in sight, or even signs of former campers. I was scanning the opposite side of the Ritter Range from atop a high ridge line on my last trip, closer up than my ole front patio view. Gosh - I think those glaciers are finally on the verge of outright extinction. Never seen em that small my entire life. But the West side is entirely trailless, and has some spectacular sections that almost never see visitors. Too much damn work accommodating that deep North Fork SJ canyon in between. There is now a bridge across the River at Hemlock Crossing, the old Indian route to Mammoth Path. It ruined one of the most iconic waterfalls in the range, at least if you want sky in the shot from below. But I don't think I've ever seen a picture of that waterfall except mine!

tgtaylor
22-Sep-2016, 09:32
Although I toured Crete prepared to camp, I stayed in rooms/hotels throughout the 1 week tour. Here are two view from one of my stays at a hotel on the Libyan Sea (Southern Mediterranean) that I have very fond memories of:

View from my room

https://c2.staticflickr.com/6/5717/29821256456_da01d42a75.jpg

View from the dining patio

https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8141/29821264966_072bf73912.jpg

Look expensive but it was quite reasonable. Pentax K1000.


Thomas

tgtaylor
3-Oct-2016, 09:19
Pescadero Slough, California.

http://spiritsofsilver.com/yahoo_site_admin/assets/images/Pescadero.22184900_large.jpg

Pentax 67II with a 75mm lens.

Thomas

Vaughn
3-Oct-2016, 11:16
Sweet, Thomas!

tgtaylor
4-Oct-2016, 09:50
Thanks Vaughn.

Ansel Adams said: "If you get one good one a month, you're doing good." Here I was lucky to be on the scene with the camera when the late afternoon sun was lighting the meadow, the low clouds and fog drifting overhead but not obscuring the mountain chain in the background, and the slough reflecting the blue of the sky.

Thomas

Vaughn
4-Oct-2016, 10:42
Ninety percent (give or take) of photography is being there.

Jeff.W
5-Oct-2016, 04:09
http://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20161005/6e7b97b5b7787697c977216e375fc858.jpg
Kodak 5222 Nikon FM3A 50/1.8D

Vaughn
5-Oct-2016, 08:53
A blast from the past...in the days when I could just hike all day without getting tired and thought nothing of wandering mind-lessly.
The day before I had wandered cross-country and ended up on the top of the volcano (semi-active Mount Ngauruhoe) in the background -- I just picked a route and walked straight up it -- and used the snow as a fast way down. On this day I wandered up from the area seen below in the photo to this area on Mount Ruapehu I believe is called the Pinnacles, looking back at Mt Ngaurahoe. Afterwards I climbed over the ridge and walked the road back down the mountain to the campground.

4x5, 150mm lens, TMax100, 16x20 silver gelatin print. Taken close to New Years Day, 1987.

For scale, Mt. Ngauruhoe is 7500' in elevation...and sticks up about 3100' above the plain. Judging from the photo, I took it about at the same elevation as the top of Mt Ngauruhoe. Mt Ruapehu is 9100' and is a major ski resort (and had a good-sized eruption in 2007). Mt Ngauruhoe's last eruption was 10 years before my visit there (1977).

For Lord of the Rings fans, Mt Ngauruhoe was used as Mt Doom (with some digital alterations).

Drew Wiley
5-Oct-2016, 09:12
So did you make it all the way to Mordor, Vaughn?

tgtaylor
5-Oct-2016, 10:28
Nice view Vaughn. At one time I had planned a bicycle tour of New Zealand but so far it hasn't materialized. Here's a photo of the Minoan Snake Goddess that I shot while in Heraklion:

https://c2.staticflickr.com/6/5180/29506878203_8ccff99b51.jpg

Pentax K1000.

Thomas

Vaughn
5-Oct-2016, 10:43
So did you make it all the way to Mordor, Vaughn?

One does not simply walk into Mordor -- that is why I rode a bicycle! Thankfully long before the Hobbit tourist traffic came into being. On the South Island, one could ride all day and have less than 20 vehicle pass you. Now it is a zoo of tourists in mini camper vans looking down at their hobbit maps! And bicycle tours.

I guess I could have a bumper sticker made..."I boot-skied down Mt Doom!"

Nice goddess! No snakes in NZ.

Vaughn
5-Oct-2016, 11:57
I spent about a week hiking around Lake Waikaremoana, NZ with the 4x5. Nice to get off the bike occasionally! This is Korokoro Falls, a short side trip from the track (trail) around the lake.

4x5, 150mm, Tmax100, 8x10 silver gelatin print

tgtaylor
5-Oct-2016, 13:27
From Puerto Natales I signed on with a tour boat that spent the day taking tourists to the various glaciers that spilled into the sea near Torres del Paines National Park in Pantagonia. Instead of coming back with them, I had them drop me off at a location where I could hike into the park - about a 13 mile hike. This is one of the glaciers that we passed:

https://c2.staticflickr.com/6/5251/30103470916_d1d2eb3cff.jpg

We went ashore at one glacier to get a close-up view and walk upon it. At that location one of the crew went ashore and cut off a block of ice from the glacier and served it in the tourists highball. I was the only one who noticed the crew mamber getting the ice and the tourists enjoyed their drink that much more when I told them.

Pentax K1000.

Thomas

Vaughn
5-Oct-2016, 13:55
Nothing like old ice! Nice Thomas!

stawastawa
5-Oct-2016, 23:58
Nice images from NZ Vaughn. I love the waterfall. and a nice dripy rendition of it.
I had such a blast on Tongariro and Ngarahue, I'll try and dig up my photo of the snow field up on Ngarahue - sounds like you had more snow though.

in the meantime, Here is yesterday playing with some IR (recent K100D conversion) while hiking some climbing cliffs outside portland.
Under the cliffs,
155857
and on the farm above the cliffs.
155856
K100D IR filter removed, + SFX Filter, Lightroom color and levels adjustments.

Henrim
8-Oct-2016, 03:26
One from last July. A goahti. This one is a permanent old style sami hut. Made of plywood.
Some 40km as the crow flies from the neareast road. About 60km on foot. Enonteki÷, Lapland, Finland.

Toyo 4 3/4 x 6 1/2 with a Horseman 6x12 back. Nikkor M 300mm. Kodak Portra 160.

http://melaanvuo.com/share/insta/goahti_sml.jpg

stawastawa
8-Oct-2016, 09:43
Henrin, hard to see and appreciate the hut. but neat landscape, and it's isolation echoes the isolation you describe in the text.

Henrim
8-Oct-2016, 10:43
Henrin, hard to see and appreciate the hut. but neat landscape, and it's isolation echoes the isolation you describe in the text.

Thanks Nicholas! That was pretty much my thinking when I took the pic. I took a few pics closer to the hut too, but unfortunately there were no people around at the time, so they are of less interest.

jp
8-Oct-2016, 15:19
Nice photos Vaughn & Henrim!

I went for a hike today. I didn't bring LF as my family isn't patient enough for that on hikes. Took my dslr and Rolleiflex. It will be a few weeks before the 120 film is processed.

tgtaylor
9-Oct-2016, 10:53
Trail Vista - Torres del Paines National Park, Patagonia.

http://spiritsofsilver.com/yahoo_site_admin/assets/images/Trail_View_Torres_del_Paines.282104709_large.jpg

Pentax 67II.

Thomas

Mark Darragh
9-Oct-2016, 11:25
155967

The Bugaboos, Purcell Mountains, British Columbia

tuco
10-Oct-2016, 05:16
Scott-Paul Trail, Mt. Baker, WA.
GSW690III, 400TMY, Y2 Yellow Filter

https://c3.staticflickr.com/9/8870/28683202714_6994353c55_o.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/KGCURQ)

tgtaylor
10-Oct-2016, 10:13
Along the Cataract Falls Trail - California.

http://spiritsofsilver.com/yahoo_site_admin/assets/images/Cataract_Falls_Trail.283100754_large.jpg

A very popular hike on the northwest slopes of Mt. Tamalpais during the rainy season which, hopefully, we'll have this year. Rain is schedued for this weekend. Nikon F3.

Thomas

williaty
10-Oct-2016, 17:45
Southern Bridge at Pine Quarry
https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8447/29818089742_6a5b701918_b.jpg

Toyo
10-Oct-2016, 18:05
One from last July. A goahti. This one is a permanent old style sami hut. Made of plywood.
Some 40km as the crow flies from the neareast road. About 60km on foot. Enonteki÷, Lapland, Finland.

Toyo 4 3/4 x 6 1/2 with a Horseman 6x12 back. Nikkor M 300mm. Kodak Portra 160.

http://melaanvuo.com/share/insta/goahti_sml.jpg

Outstanding image and outstanding hiking.
Congratulations
T

Andrew O'Neill
12-Oct-2016, 10:46
Up on British Columbia's largest dune. Farwell Canyon. HP5 8x10. Pyrocat-HD.

https://c4.staticflickr.com/6/5767/29653658483_24b74e26fd_b.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/MboKxR)Farwell Canyon Dune (https://flic.kr/p/MboKxR) by Andrew O'Neill (https://www.flickr.com/photos/62974341@N02/), on Flickr

tuco
12-Oct-2016, 10:58
Up on British Columbia's largest dune. Farwell Canyon. HP5 8x10. Pyrocat-HD.



Nice. One of my favorite hikes is on the Oregon Sand Dunes. I go there every chance I get.

Andrew O'Neill
12-Oct-2016, 11:35
Most of our dunes up here are fairly isolated... which is a good thing. Athabasca Lake is a place I'd love to go to, but only way in is by float plane... Luckily there are some dunes in southern Saskatchewan that have been a source of inspiration for me.
Here is a pic of my wife standing at the top of the big dune in Farwell Canyon...(phone pic)

https://c2.staticflickr.com/9/8136/30284891305_0190fa2259_b.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/N9aZ5n)Chie on Dune (https://flic.kr/p/N9aZ5n) by Andrew O'Neill (https://www.flickr.com/photos/62974341@N02/), on Flickr

tgtaylor
12-Oct-2016, 12:57
Trail View - Sierra Nevada

https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8549/30286232445_6982946ccc_z.jpg

Pentax K1000.

Thomas

Henrim
12-Oct-2016, 13:21
Thanks, Toyo.

Vaughn
12-Oct-2016, 15:37
Great dune images. Got to toss in a few from Eureka Valley Sand Dunes -- photographing with a buddy.
Ice on the dune, wind on the top, and a photo of my friend.

tuco
12-Oct-2016, 19:17
Really nice, Vaughn.

Here are some older ones of mine on the Oregon Sand Dunes near Florence, FWIW.

Mamiya 7II, 43/4.5, 100ACR

https://c6.staticflickr.com/9/8218/8335086309_836996f528_o.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/dGxuLD)


100TMX

https://c4.staticflickr.com/9/8198/8282405435_668eacdbd8_o.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/dBTuzH)


100TMX

https://c5.staticflickr.com/3/2915/14312720924_cc4eabc387_o.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/nNLrhq)

Vaughn
12-Oct-2016, 19:39
Worth a lot, tuco!

Great photos all around!

stawastawa
13-Oct-2016, 01:28
Vaughn, I love the gesture of #2. I also really like the expanses and sense of place in #3. Reminds me, it takes a while to drag feet along those sandy dune ridgelines...

Tuco, I love the very different atmosphere of Florence. well captured, Very desolate and succumbing to desolations - while other dunes are places of sand, your images feel of places suddenly taken over, places that still remember the forest. and I love the tones!


while in dune territory, here is an the Colorado Sand dunes from 2009. sorry can't find the larger size

https://stawaproductions.files.wordpress.com/2011/08/cropped-cropped-dunesbw1.jpg

comments / critique always welcome

tuco
13-Oct-2016, 05:46
Worth a lot, tuco!

Great photos all around!


V
Tuco, I love the very different atmosphere of Florence. well captured, Very desolate and succumbing to desolations - while other dunes are places of sand, your images feel of places suddenly taken over, places that still remember the forest. and I love the tones!


Thanks you guys. Those dunes look like mountains. The ones along the coast of Oregon are not very tall. I go every year and things appear and disappear under the sand as it shifts around.

Vaughn
13-Oct-2016, 07:59
Thanks you guys. Those dunes look like mountains. The ones along the coast of Oregon are not very tall. I go every year and things appear and disappear under the sand as it shifts around.

I believe the Eureka Valley Sand Dunes are the tallest in North America...often see military jets fly around them...looking down at the jets from the sand dune tops. The Oregon coast dunes are great, also.

The Eureka Valley Sand Dunes from a distance. There was too much wind to be on the dunes so we hiked around the outskirts. Editted to add -- this was taken with a 150mm lens on 4x5 film.

Erik Larsen
13-Oct-2016, 08:17
I believe star dune in Colorado is the tallest in NA.

Drew Wiley
13-Oct-2016, 08:45
There's nothing official about the height of any dune. They change, with a lot of factors being especially dynamic including wind, the amount of groundcover in
relation to erosion, etc. It amazes me how much the dune system at the end of Panamint Valley has shrunken since my youth. What the next inevitable Dust Bowl
will bring is hard to say. We might be seeing dune systems in neo ghost towns on the southern Plains. What I love about the Oregon coastal dunes is the lovely
little lily ponds that fill some of the depressions.

Vaughn
13-Oct-2016, 10:00
I believe star dune in Colorado is the tallest in NA.

Looks like you are correct, tho the NPS says Star Dune is tallest in NA at 750 feet while Eureka Valley Sand Dune might be the tallest at 680 feet. Like Drew suggests, might depend on how the wind blows!

tgtaylor
13-Oct-2016, 11:34
Trail-view, Diable Range - Winter/Spring, Alameda County, Califiornia.

http://spiritsofsilver.com/yahoo_site_admin/assets/images/East_Bay_Trail_View.286115139_large.jpg

We're supposed to be getting "heavy" rainwi this weekend which means that the hills will shed the brown/gold of the summer/fall and turn green.

Pentax 67II, 75mm lens.

Thomas

Corran
13-Oct-2016, 11:39
tuco, I always love your dune photos. I thought about your images a few months ago when I was working in Arizona and got to visit the southern California dunes for an afternoon. Wish I would've been able to have film there.

I hiked over 11 miles yesterday, across a large swath of the Appalachian Trail on the Blue Ridge. Found a beautiful lookout that I am going to go back to soon, hopefully with more fall color, some clouds, and a few rolls of color film. But here's the photo I took for reference, with my 2x3 Century, 38mm XL + R60 filter, on Acros dev'd in Rodinal 1:50:

http://www.garrisaudiovisual.com/photosharing/coopergap-4540ss.jpg

Vaughn
13-Oct-2016, 11:52
Nice find, Corran! Do not remember many far views along the Blue Ridge Parkway (driving thru with kids ~8 years ago).

Vaughn
13-Oct-2016, 11:55
Nice find, Corran! Do not remember many far views along the Blue Ridge Parkway (driving thru with kids ~8 years ago).

Same friend I photographed at Eureka Valley Dunes -- but this time on the Oregon Dunes! He was trying to figure out why I had the Rollei turn so weird! Scan of a RA4 print.

Corran
13-Oct-2016, 12:08
Thanks Vaughn. That was the only fully open view in that whole stretch - there was just a view somewhat clear areas like this:

http://www.garrisaudiovisual.com/photosharing/coopergap-4534ss.jpg

On the parkway I think there are a couple of pull-offs with decent views now but by and large it's obscured with trees. I think that's why you simply don't see a whole lot of mountain vistas from the north GA mountains. Luckily the first view is only about 2 miles from a parking area near the end of my trek so next time I will just go there and make it to that area at sunset. The view behind me on the rocks was beautiful too so I'm going to bring my 360 degree camera and give it a shot there :).

tgtaylor
13-Oct-2016, 12:33
Untitled - Pinnacles National Park, California.

http://spiritsofsilver.com/yahoo_site_admin/assets/images/Pinnacles.286122749_large.jpg

Pentax 67II.

Thomas

Vaughn
13-Oct-2016, 12:59
Nice Thomas -- been decades since I was there!

tgtaylor
13-Oct-2016, 14:10
Thanks Vaughn. It used to be a National Monument now it's a National Park.

These are not strictly "hiking" photos butthe next best thing: 1999 bicycle tour from Madrid to Rome:

https://c2.staticflickr.com/6/5512/29676540983_ee1f67a250_z.jpg

https://c2.staticflickr.com/8/7468/30191486672_13b0b91d93_z.jpg

Just 8 Km to go to the pass.

Pentax K1000, commercial RA-4 prints.

Thomas

cuypers1807
13-Oct-2016, 14:42
https://c3.staticflickr.com/6/5622/22660652482_20f5b20249_c.jpg
Hiker Silhouette
Hanging Rock State Park
5x7 tintype from 35mm film positive.

tuco
13-Oct-2016, 19:48
tuco, I always love your dune photos. I thought about your images a few months ago when I was working in Arizona and got to visit the southern California dunes for an afternoon. Wish I would've been able to have film there.



Thanks.

It still looks like late summer in your pictures. They're making me miss summer already. I'm buckling down for an unseasonably high wind storm heading my way

tgtaylor
15-Oct-2016, 12:42
Trailside Waterfall - California.

http://spiritsofsilver.com/yahoo_site_admin/assets/images/Trailside_Waterfall.288123824_large.jpg

Pentax 67II.

Thomas

osmeier
16-Oct-2016, 02:43
Swiss Alps - View from Fuorcla digl Leget. Taken with a Nikon FM3A on Kodak Ektar
156227

Hiking up to the view above, with no real trail in site. Also the Nikon FM3A this time on Kodak Gold 200
156228

tgtaylor
18-Oct-2016, 11:53
Here's a shot taken of my pack while backpacking in Torres del Paines national park in Patagonia:

https://c2.staticflickr.com/6/5592/30114564660_f35ff90046_b.jpg

Whether in the US or overseas, this has been my standard pack for multi-day hiking. Visible at the bottom of the pack are Teva sandals for stream crossing and a tent and ground-cover/poncho is on the right. A tripod and air mattress is on the left with a fuel bottle attached next to the mattress. A map case with compass is at the top of the pack. This particular excursion was for a week so the pack contained a weeks provisions (freeze-dried meals), stove, water purification pump, down sleeping bag, personal care supplies, 35mm and Pentax 67II and film...etc. Two 1 liter water bottles in insulated containers are attached at the sides.

I camped the night before at a base camp for the assent and had supper with several Chileans. The weather didn't look promising at the time but at 2:30am the awoke me saying the weather was right and sure enough the stars were out so I saddled-up and arrived at the summit at dawn.

Thomas

tuco
19-Oct-2016, 07:25
Here's a shot taken of my pack while backpacking in Torres del Paines national park in Patagonia:

Thomas

Your setup looks pretty efficient for hauling a 6x7 too. A funny thing for me is in my younger days I could go backpacking and haul half the weight than what I'd take today. Even my day hikes I seem to over-pack. Must be an old age thing or I have accumulated more stuff that I think I can't live without.

BennehBoy
19-Oct-2016, 07:51
All shot with a Mamiya 7

Me atop Scafell Pike:
https://c2.staticflickr.com/5/4140/4779271377_d085eee51e_b.jpg

My climbing buddy:
https://c6.staticflickr.com/5/4140/4779375013_45a4dacd98_o.jpg

Another buddy on top of Hard Knott:
https://c8.staticflickr.com/5/4027/4334467639_3a60c0e5b3_b.jpg

Heading out:
https://c3.staticflickr.com/5/4067/4335181218_783072e70c_b.jpg

My Sinar & SpeedGraphic are way too heavy to take up hills.

tuco
19-Oct-2016, 08:17
All shot with a Mamiya 7 ... My Sinar & SpeedGraphic are way too heavy to take up hills.


Really nice photos. Yeah, I haul a small digital camera more and more on my hikes these days.

orgraph
19-Oct-2016, 08:54
Georgia, 2016, 4x5
https://c5.staticflickr.com/9/8313/29275263092_5fa9f69531_o.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/LAXnMo)Ushba, Georgia, 2016. Yuriy Sanin (https://flic.kr/p/LAXnMo) by Yuriy Sanin (https://www.flickr.com/photos/52922077@N08/), on Flickr

Vaughn
19-Oct-2016, 08:56
Really nice photos. Yeah, I haul a small digital camera more and more on my hikes these days.

That is why I need to get my Rolleicord fixed -- light camera...much lighter than my Rollieflex 2.8 that need to have worked on also.

Great hiking photos all around!!

orgraph
19-Oct-2016, 08:56
Nepal, 2009, 6x6 (Mamiya-6)
https://c6.staticflickr.com/6/5715/22589755917_7bfe22a7bd_o.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/Aqbpqi)Nepal (https://flic.kr/p/Aqbpqi) by Yuriy Sanin (https://www.flickr.com/photos/52922077@N08/), on Flickr
https://c3.staticflickr.com/6/5729/22385259714_1257d3afa9_o.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/A77iPG)Nepal (https://flic.kr/p/A77iPG) by Yuriy Sanin (https://www.flickr.com/photos/52922077@N08/), on Flickr

tuco
19-Oct-2016, 09:46
Those are sweet, @orgraph

I took my 500C/M loaded with 100ACR along on this Hiking trip in the Snoqualmie National Forest, Washington. Each shot is at a different elevation as we hiked up the trail

https://c2.staticflickr.com/2/1314/4591941289_79ee4eca32_o.jpg
(https://flic.kr/p/7ZLUax)Snoqualmie National Forest, WA (https://flic.kr/p/7ZLUax) by tuco (https://www.flickr.com/photos/yo_tuco/), on Flickr


https://c5.staticflickr.com/8/7523/15705770148_63798562dc_o.jpg
(https://flic.kr/p/pVSbhu)Rattlesnake Ridge (https://flic.kr/p/pVSbhu) by tuco (https://www.flickr.com/photos/yo_tuco/), on Flickr

tgtaylor
19-Oct-2016, 09:59
Yes, really great hiking photos everyone!

This is one of the images I captured of the Torres that morning: http://www.spiritsofsilver.com/yahoo_site_admin/assets/images/The_Torres.242221542_large.jpg

At the top the wind becomes a major factor as the day progresses. I found a small cave formed by large boulders in which gave me protection from the wind and a view of the Torres which I photographed the constantly changing scene with clouds obscuring and snow blowing until almost noon at which time the wind reached to seemingly hurricane strength. I was unable to stand against it so I made my way over the backside blocking the wind and picked my way around the circumference until I could get back down the way I came in. The constantly changing weather and wind is the main impediment which prevented the Torres being successfully climbed until recently.

This was the only time that I can remember taking two camera systems on a backpacking trip. Usually I only take one, usually the P67II, which requires a tripod.

Thomas

tuco
19-Oct-2016, 19:36
I've posted this before but it belongs here. Sunset at Camp Muir on Mt. Rainier in Washington. You'd grab a bite to eat and hopefully a couple hours of sleep before getting up at 1:00AM to finish the climb.
Pentax 6x7, 55/4

https://c2.staticflickr.com/4/3421/3351811577_5a9a03ed5e_o.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/67bUNM)
View From Camp Muir (https://flic.kr/p/67bUNM) by tuco (https://www.flickr.com/photos/yo_tuco/), on Flickr

Toyo
19-Oct-2016, 20:03
A walking track not too far from home.
Pentax 67 with Super-Multi-Coated Takumar 75mm lens
Fomapan 100 developed in R09
T

156430

Corran
19-Oct-2016, 21:58
I'm impressed with you guys hiking seriously with your Pentax 67's. That thing is too dang heavy, and needs a big beefy tripod to counteract the shutter shock too! I'm sticking with my little 2x3 Century Graphics - just bought another one for $75, a basic one with no rangefinder and a newer, lighter body - complete with neato red bellows too!

Here's one with said Century and 80mm f/2.8 Xenotar, on Provia 100F:

http://www.garrisaudiovisual.com/photosharing/justuscreekss.jpg

This was deep in the Appalachian Trail, about 5 miles from the nearest trailhead, along "Justus Creek." I cheated a little bit - I took both a b&w and a color image, and then overlaid the b&w image on the color in the water to give more tone to the sunlit water which was whited out.

tuco
20-Oct-2016, 05:34
I'm impressed with you guys hiking seriously with your Pentax 67's. That thing is too dang heavy, and needs a big beefy tripod to counteract the shutter shock too!

I shoot my Pentax 6x7 with a WLF (aka the folding hood) and it makes the camera much lighter. And most of my Pentax 67 pictures are handhold. When I compare them to my 500C/M, Mamiya 7II and Fuji GSW6900II pictures, they look pretty much the same. So with a choice of those other 3 cameras I have, I still reach for my Pentax 6x7. And you only need a large tripod when you have long, heavy glass on it which would be true for any other medium formant camera too. :)

Corran
20-Oct-2016, 05:40
I do agree handheld is where the Pentax is best! I have a 67ii and like it a lot - for certain things (especially longer lenses, like 400+). I did a test once with an older Pentax 67 on my bigger tripod shot at 1/30th, 1/15th, and 1/8th and it bounced the whole tripod. Since I seemed to shoot around there and hiking-wise I use/prefer a smaller tripod I just don't hike long distances with it. The lenses are indeed awesome though.

tuco
20-Oct-2016, 05:43
On a a smaller tripod, put your hand on top of the camera and gently push down. It helps a lot.

Corran
20-Oct-2016, 05:49
Yep done that too, and it does help...I just prefer less weight, less size, and less trouble! :) Really the small tripod I have is not appropriate for the Pentax, at about 2.5 pounds including head. It's not really even good for a DSLR camera of moderate size, but it handles my Chamonix 4x5 and similarly-sized/weight cameras.

tuco
20-Oct-2016, 05:59
Yep done that too, and it does help...I just prefer less weight, less size, and less trouble! :) Really the small tripod I have is not appropriate for the Pentax, at about 2.5 pounds including head. It's not really even good for a DSLR camera of moderate size, but it handles my Chamonix 4x5 and similarly-sized/weight cameras.

I hear yeah. I didn't have my M7II at the time when I took that Mt. Rainier trip; otherwise, I would have taken it for sure. I have a M9 now that makes for a compact hiking camera.

Ray Van Nes
20-Oct-2016, 08:15
Yes I am another who uses the Century 2 x3. Mine is the " mahoganite" or bakelite model. I stripped off the rangefinder as I did not use it to save weight and now it weighs 3 lbs including the lens. It is rugged , rigid and light. The lenses are also small which is also a consideration when hiking. It has been up many summits as well as my go to camera for travel.

Drew Wiley
20-Oct-2016, 08:44
A basic P67 kit isn't any lighter than a decent 4x5 folder with similar focal lengths and even a few filmholders included. The only advantage it has is speed of operation and greater resistance to wind in terms of not having a bellows/kite. But it's that bellows that allow far lighter lenses, even in longer focal lengths, as
well a view camera movements. So it's really a tradeoff. And over the years, I have routinely opted for a view camera, and have generally been disappointed in the few instances I took the 6x7, which incidentally, I used exclusively for a brief period before moving up to 4x5. More often the P67 serves as a snapshot system for road travel or especially rainy dayhikes, or sheer fun with a long quickie telephoto, for wildlife etc. Now I'm experimenting with a Fuji GW690, which is far easier to handhold than a P67, much lighter, but obviously restricted to a 90mm lens. But I am getting excellent negs with it, and it is seriously cut into my need for 35mm. It's all fun. I experiment, knowing full well that at some point in geezerhood, my backpacking load will need to become progressively lighter.
8x10 is still may favorite dayhike format.

Ray Van Nes
20-Oct-2016, 09:51
Interesting point. I have hiked with both 4 x5 and occasionally 5x7 as well as the Century 2 x3. I will post an image from the Century as I should have in the first note. This is from my Icelines & Ridgelines series which is on my website www.rayvannesphotography.com . Perhaps you can tell which is which, 4 x5 or 6 x9.156445

tgtaylor
20-Oct-2016, 10:53
I'd guess that the one posted above is 6x9 from the scanned dimensions. But its difficult to tell a 6x7 from a 4x5 in a small to mid-size print not requiring a parallax correction.

I can count on one finger the number of hand-held shots I took with the P67 - and I didn't like how that one came out. I always shoot with a tripod - even 35 and 645 although I will do street photography hand-held with the 35mm but even then usually have a backpack with a series 0 Gitzo attached for those shots that will permit a tripod. I ordered my P67 new along with a new Manfrotto Carbon One 441 tripod and used it for years with the P67. In the photo of by pack in Patagonia its in the blue Manfrotto case. It does move when the shutter is activated but I have read that by then the shutter would have already opened and closed and I have never noticed and blur in my negatives from camera movement. That tripod is now broke from over use and I have replaced it with a Gitzo G1348 w/Arca Swiss z1sp and there is zero movement even when the camera is off axis w a 400mm lens attached. I still have the 441 and it can be repaired which I think I will do.

Great photos everyone! Keep 'em coming.

Thomas

Vaughn
20-Oct-2016, 11:06
For fun, here is a big fellow I met up in the Trinity Alps a year or so ago. He was walking towards me, but turned and went side slope before he saw me. This is a digitally photographed negative on a slide table -- then inversed in PhotoShop. The 75mm lens on the Rolleicrod is not exactly a good combo for wildlife!

Drew Wiley
20-Oct-2016, 12:27
I've flown over the Trinity Alps but never hiked there yet. Probably too hot for me in the summer. My neighbors, also in their mid 60's, just returned from a backpack trip there and said the Oct temps were comfortable. Fortunately they got out just before that torrential rainstorm which probably made stream crossings
temporarily dangerous.

Vaughn
20-Oct-2016, 16:11
For someone living in the general area of the Trinities (and Marbles and Russian, etc) for the last 45 years, I have not spent a lot time up there. Mostly short off-season trips, but enough to kinda know the feel of the Red Trinities and the White Trinities (I love where the two rock types meet). Even a trip every other year, I guess it is still a bunch of trips, but many to the same places, especially Canyon Creek. Working for the Forest Service for a dozen seasons in the Yolla Bolly Wilderness meant that I did not do a lot of hiking elsewhere during that time. But I managed!
:cool:
Locally, the Kings Range and the hike on the beach below it (Lost Coast) is unique. Kings Peak is 4100' (or will be), and from on top you can watch the surfers in the waves three miles away. The surfers hike or take a boat to Big Flat. Once I watched the sun set from the top of Kings Peak, as the full moon rose over the Yolla Bollys 65 miles away (give or take). And I love the sunsets I see in the Yolla Bollys, watching the sun set over the Kings Range.

Drew Wiley
20-Oct-2016, 16:22
Seems that everybody but me has hiked the Lost Coast, Trinities too. But the treks at the top of my bucket list are the more strenuous ones that I need to do while I still can. As somebody here said, at a certain point, you not only grow older, but older faster. Talked to a friend of mine over the weekend that is on the downhill
side of his 70's but still planning a 3-weeker in King Canyon next summer. Said nobody wanted to hike with him because he was so slow. Who cares. As long as you
can keep putting one foot ahead of another. And if the snow gets too deep, pull a darkslide and simply snowboard your way back downhill.

Vaughn
20-Oct-2016, 17:54
I helped to some trail work around Kings Peak -- including a trail going from the ridge below the peak (closer to 3200' elev), down Rattlesnake Ridge to the sea. I have not done the whole Mattole River to Shelter Cove -- a couple over-night trips from the Mattole and back (to an old lighthouse). Cheating...here is a photo by my son who was there last...I went years ago -- looks like a lot of work has been done on the place.

Corran
21-Oct-2016, 08:27
Two more images from the summit of Brasstown Bald. Rolleicord I w/ Triotar, Provia 100F:

http://www.garrisaudiovisual.com/photosharing/brasstownbald-4767ss.jpg

http://www.garrisaudiovisual.com/photosharing/brasstownbald-4771ss.jpg

tgtaylor
21-Oct-2016, 09:53
At Trail Crest on the JMT I ran into a popular elderly gentleman in either his late 70' or early 80's universally known as "The Green Turtle" - a moniker he gave to himself because a turtle was the only thing slower on the trail then he was.

Thomas

Drew Wiley
21-Oct-2016, 10:08
I generally avoid the JMT, but had to do about six miles of it in Kings Can headed toward Forester Pass a few years ago in late Sept before going off-trail. Some
strange sights indeed, even for late season - one guy wearing a face mask way up in that clean air to avoid catching flu from the deer, another one wearing his wilderness permit hanging from his neck in one of those trade-show plastic pouches, a few speed-hikers who were so delirious they didn't even notice any of the scenery. Then some young guys came by with a huge solar panel installed atop one of the pack and old-school walkie-talkie radios. I was just hanging out fiddling with a 4x5 shot of the incredible texture of the face of East Vidette, which came out wonderfully. Then finally a couple well into their 80's ambled by, barely moving, yet with ample packs, and also with a walkie talkie; so then I got it - the young guys were their sons, and this was how they kept in touch. Thought to myself, how wonderful - they're still at it. Good for them!

tgtaylor
21-Oct-2016, 10:15
Once, while hiking over Kearsarge Pass, I ran into a guy dressed completely in white - from head to toe and even wearing white gloves. I stopped and made small trail talk with him - weather, terrain, etc., but didn't ask why he was dressed all up in white. From the exposed skin around his eyes that I could see, he was very fair-skinned and I assumed that was the reason why.

Thomas

Vaughn
21-Oct-2016, 21:24
At Trail Crest on the JMT I ran into a popular elderly gentleman in either his late 70' or early 80's universally known as "The Green Turtle" - a moniker he gave to himself because a turtle was the only thing slower on the trail then he was. Thomas

My parents backpacked into their early 60s, getting to the top of Mt Whitney (approached from the west) when they were 60. My Mom's trail name was Leaping Turtle -- She did not like being on anything (logs over creeks, etc) higher than a turtle could leap.

tuco
22-Oct-2016, 10:01
Mount Rainier area, M7II, 100TMX

https://c6.staticflickr.com/7/6072/6083668109_f33b006557_o.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/agAozt)


https://c5.staticflickr.com/7/6197/6068142788_bc55d892fd_o.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/afdPrw)
Mt. Rainier From Tolmie Peak (https://flic.kr/p/afdPrw) by tuco (https://www.flickr.com/photos/yo_tuco/), on Flickr

David Lobato
23-Oct-2016, 19:32
North Face of Blanca Peak, Sangre de Cristo Mountains, Colorado. An old scan of an even older Kodachrome slide.

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/55432652/North%20Face%20Blanca%20Peak%20File0004%20800LFF.jpg

Mark Darragh
24-Oct-2016, 02:52
Snowpatch Spire from the valley below Conrad Kaine hut, The Bugaboos, Purcell Mountains, British Columbia, Canada

Arca Swiss F Line Field 4x5, Schneider Super Symmar 80mm XL, Lee Polariser, Fujichrome Provia RDP 100

tgtaylor
24-Oct-2016, 09:55
Elk Herd - Eastern Sierra Nevada.

https://c2.staticflickr.com/6/5762/30504415906_2f9c68dc82_z.jpg

While driving north from Lone Pine on US 395 early one morning after a hike, I spotted this heard on the opposite side of the highway and made a U-turn. The slowest shutter speed permissible wasn't sufficient to freeze all motion.

Pentax 67II, 300mm lens.

tgtaylor
25-Oct-2016, 12:48
Village Street - Southern France

http://spiritsofsilver.com/yahoo_site_admin/assets/images/France.298123611_large.jpg

One of the many pluses of bicycle touring is that you can pull of the road and tour a village that looks interesting and have your wheels with you. This is a street view in a very artsy looking small village in southern France about one or two days ride from the border with Spain. After touring the village, I stopped for an ice cream and soda break at an outdoor cafe directly across from the Hotel de Ville.

Pentax K1000, RA-4 machine print on Agfa paper.

Thomas

David_Senesac
25-Oct-2016, 20:30
Though a senior citizen now, as an old landscape photographer did a great deal of hiking this year including 4 backpacking trips and many road and day trips. The following is from Death Valley National Park during the wildflower Superbloom this spring, an 8 image frame 12400 x 9600 pixel 4 column 2 row stitch blend focus stack blend of 51 images with my 24 megapixel A6000 with Sigma 60mm DN lens atop a Nodal Ninja MK3 II panoramic head. Processing with Kolor Autopano and Adobe Photoshop CS6.

http://www.davidsenesac.com/2016_Trip_Chronicles/PC03434-03484-4x2vsl.jpg


To read more about the image and that specific trip select Page 3 on this Contents page link below of my landscape and nature work this year:

http://www.davidsenesac.com/2016_Trip_Chronicles

David_Senesac
25-Oct-2016, 21:07
A second image. The below landscape is from Kings Canyon National Park on September 9, 2016. Dusy Basin image of Isosceles Peak with Thunderbolt Peak and North Palisade in the background. In the foreground is dwarf bilberry, leaves of which turn reddish purple in the High Sierra late summer. My fourth backpack of the summer. I first shot this peak in 1986 with a 35mm SLR and that small image is still the marquee image for that peak at www.summitpost.org. A 6 image frame 9600 x 10200 pixel 3 column 2 row stitch blend focus stack blend of 31 images with my 24 megapixel A6000 with Sigma 60mm DN lens atop a Nodal Ninja MK3 II panoramic head. Processing with Kolor Autopano and Adobe Photoshop CS6:

http://www.davidsenesac.com/2016_Trip_Chronicles/PU04461-04491-3x2vsl.jpg


To read more about the image and that specific trip select Page 15 on this Contents page of my landscape and nature work this year:

http://www.davidsenesac.com/2016_Trip_Chronicles

tgtaylor
26-Oct-2016, 10:27
A Desert Bouquet - Anza-Borrego Desert State Park, California.

http://spiritsofsilver.com/yahoo_site_admin/assets/images/A_Desert_Bouquet.299101900_large.jpg

Pentax 67II.

Thomas

Drew Wiley
26-Oct-2016, 11:08
You're making me homesick again, David. I was pretty much all over the Silver Divide in my teens, and the first person ever up Isaak Walton, despite the Sierra
Clubbers making their claim ten years later by ignoring my cairn. Doubt they were ever up there - from their description, probably did the easier and slightly lower "Old Isaac Walton" further down the main ridge. I spent four days in my Bibler tent in a blizzard at Mott Lk about five years ago, though the storm cleared long enough for a German party to make it up Isaac Walton via my original descent route. Of course, the real gem up there is that stunning granite face of Pk 11212, another peak I damn near peed my pants free-climbing (from the glacier in Grinnel Basin - now gone, not up the face); but someone legitimately beat me to that one! I only had time for one trip this year, to the quiet SE corner of Yosemite, including the Lyell Fork. Lots of red and yellow groundcover already in late August. Where the reds go absolutely insane are in the Dinkey Wilderness in early Oct - rather easy hiking compared to the Palisades etc.

mmerig
28-Oct-2016, 08:16
I was pretty much all over the Silver Divide in my teens, and the first person ever up Isaak Walton, despite the Sierra Clubbers making their claim ten years later by ignoring my cairn. Doubt they were ever up there - from their description, probably did the easier and slightly lower "Old Isaac Walton" further down the main ridge.

Although both peaks are not very difficult, all known ascent routes on the old Mt Izaak Walton (Pk 11840 ft) are rated as more difficult (a little bit of class 4) than any of the routes on what is now called Mt. Izaak Walton (12099 ft, class 2 and 3). Guidebook references: Hervey Voge's (only covers pk. 11840) , Steve Roper's, and R. J. Secor's. Why don't you write Secor with a correction on ascent priority? Did you ever write Steve Roper?

Vaughn
28-Oct-2016, 09:19
A blast from the past -- me and the boys on a hike in Bryce Canyon.

Drew Wiley
28-Oct-2016, 09:47
Oh, we locals just got used to the BS. The Sierra Club was never really welcomed locally because they had the nerve to lecture us, then left trash everywhere on
their convoy-style 200-horse mass outings. That was obviously a long time back, and none of our Sierra wilderness areas now allow large horse parties or military -footprint camping anywhere. But those climbing guides have alleged numerous first ascents of easier peaks that some of the locals rode horses up repeatedly for decades before they were "officially" climbed, hiked up many others, and probably there were flakes of obsidian near the summit when they first got there. It would have been evident to any "peakbagger" arriving later. I don't really care. I was just another stupid country kid who didn't know any better climbing up something, and then had to figure out how to get back down. It's how I grew up, that's all. Safe extreme technical climbing began with the next generation of our family.

Drew Wiley
28-Oct-2016, 15:57
Oh, back to that ... yeah, it's abundantly evident from the route descriptions in that old Roper list that they have the two peaks backwards, which makes me question if the faux first ascent happened at all. There's only one relatively easy route up the real deal, and it's from a remote basin rarely entered. The real Walton has a nasty overhanging face. Gosh to I remember that. The typical routes are high class 3 or mild 4. The slightly lower faux Mt Walton further down the ridge is a basic Class 2 walk-up, and sounds more like what they claimed to have climbed. I just have mixed feeling about going back to the area now that a couple of gorgeous little cirque glaciers have completely disappeared. It's one of those areas I want to remember as I first found it: not even a footprint or fire ring anywhere in sight. Of course, I have been back several times, but always by some gnarly route that gave me a hefty dose of solitude and required an ice axe. Doubt I'll ever need an ice axe in the Sierra again the way things are melting.

Ken Lee
28-Oct-2016, 17:06
http://www.kennethleegallery.com/images/forum/2002-10-01.jpg
Massachusetts, October 2002
Tachihara Field Camera, 150mm APO Sironar S
4x5 TMY, D-76

tuco
29-Oct-2016, 11:08
Nice scene, Ken.

Some from the archives backpacking along the Olympic National Park in Washington in the winter to avoid the crowds. It was lean times for the skillful raccoons in the area who had mastered zippers, latches, bottle caps and other things. It was a challenge keeping them from getting your food.


400TMY-1

https://c7.staticflickr.com/4/3753/12340398494_570e456095_o.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/jNtLxh)
Olympic Nat. Park (https://flic.kr/p/jNtLxh) by tuco (https://www.flickr.com/photos/yo_tuco/), on Flickr

TXP

https://c7.staticflickr.com/9/8085/8393565726_6e6b7b1f53_o.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/dMHdEs)
Field Repair (https://flic.kr/p/dMHdEs) by tuco (https://www.flickr.com/photos/yo_tuco/), on Flickr

tgtaylor
29-Oct-2016, 11:35
Winter Oak, Fog - Diablo range, Contra Costa County, California.

http://spiritsofsilver.com/yahoo_site_admin/assets/images/Clayton.298112448_large.jpg

About 4.5 miles in on a 7 mile loop hike. From its symmetry I first thought that it was a bay tree but bay trees are evergreen. Pentax 67II with 75mm lens.

Thomas

David Lobato
29-Oct-2016, 14:30
My wife hiking at Chaco Culture Culture NHP 3 weeks ago.

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/55432652/Susan%20Chaco%20NHP%20DSC_3418%20800LFF.jpg

tuco
29-Oct-2016, 16:10
David, that's an area I'd like to check out. Do you have more of the surrounding area?

A scene on the Hobbit Beach trail to catch the sunset in Oregon.

https://c6.staticflickr.com/9/8573/28689819565_562003671d_o.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/KHdPPt)

David Lobato
29-Oct-2016, 16:52
My wife on the Ben Lomond trail above Queenstown NZ last November. Tuco, I'll send you a PM.

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/55432652/Susan%20Ben%20Lomond%20DSC_5417%20850LFF.jpg

williaty
29-Oct-2016, 18:05
Nice scene, Ken.

Some from the archives backpacking along the Olympic National Park in Washington in the winter to avoid the crowds. It was lean times for the skillful raccoons in the area who had mastered zippers, latches, bottle caps and other things. It was a challenge keeping them from getting your food.
Early to mid 80s? Those pictures really remind me of my dad, who was in to a lot of mountaineering and camping while I was a kid in the 80s.

tuco
30-Oct-2016, 00:25
Early to mid 80s?

Nope more like 2001 or 2002.

williaty
30-Oct-2016, 18:07
Nope more like 2001 or 2002.

Huh, that's really surprising. That's a dead ringer for the kind of gear and look of the 80s outdoors. The checkered and plaid flannel shirts, the gray/white woolen hat and gloves, the LLBean shoes,

tuco
30-Oct-2016, 19:12
Huh, that's really surprising. That's a dead ringer for the kind of gear and look of the 80s outdoors. The checkered and plaid flannel shirts, the gray/white woolen hat and gloves, the LLBean shoes,

Oh yeah, some old gear. Most of it was purchased in the early 90s IIRC. I purchased the camera that took the photo in 1989.

tuco
30-Oct-2016, 19:15
Tuco, I'll send you a PM.

Thanks for a nice tour of the place.

tgtaylor
1-Nov-2016, 12:23
Silver Lake (?) - Sierra Nevada, California.

I believe this is Silver Lake - a rather large lake that was partially frozen at the time. Taken while on a winter snowshoe backpack. Pentax 67II, Scala film.

Thomas

Vaughn
1-Nov-2016, 14:49
Huh, that's really surprising. That's a dead ringer for the kind of gear and look of the 80s outdoors. The checkered and plaid flannel shirts, the gray/white woolen hat and gloves, the LLBean shoes,
And the army surplus German winter woolen overpants! Everyday wear during the winter when you didn't have a heater or wood stove in the house (late 70s and thru the 80s).

tuco
2-Nov-2016, 05:29
And the army surplus German winter woolen overpants! Everyday wear during the winter when you didn't have a heater or wood stove in the house (late 70s and thru the 80s).

To clarify, when I was talking gear, I wasn't talking clothing but rather the backpack. The clothing is way older than the photo. He probably had hat stuff for 15 or more years prior to that trip. I had similar wool pants purchased at a surplus store too.

tgtaylor
4-Nov-2016, 14:31
The La Sal Range - View from Arches National Park, Utah.

http://spiritsofsilver.com/yahoo_site_admin/assets/images/Untitled_Arches.308141016_large.jpg

Note the two "water pockets" in the immediate foreground at the far left. In the past were essential to travel across this type terrain. Pentax 67II, 105mm lens.

Thomas

David Lobato
4-Nov-2016, 15:36
Thomas, nice.

It reminded me of this I have of Arches N.P. Fuji 6x7 RF, 90mm lens, cropped for 16:9 format

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/55432652/Arches%20NP%2001%20850LFF.jpg

tgtaylor
5-Nov-2016, 10:56
Nice shot David. Interesting that the range appears to have a greater extension in my shot notwithstanding that it was taken from a much greater distance and from a similar central axis.

Thomas

tgtaylor
7-Nov-2016, 11:24
Untitled - Grand Canyon, Arizona.

http://spiritsofsilver.com/yahoo_site_admin/assets/images/Grand_Canyon_1.311101654_large.jpg

Pentax 67II, 200mm Lens.

Thomas

bobbotron
3-Mar-2017, 09:27
Here's one of my funny dog, hiking in the woods; taken with a pentax 645.

https://c1.staticflickr.com/1/594/22897108659_00375c84e8.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/ATkEFv)

Leszek Vogt
3-Mar-2017, 14:44
Hiking the edge of Colo River in G. Canyon. V. often one runs across something not so ordinary.

Les

162081

David Hedley
4-Mar-2017, 10:22
One from today's hike (or, to be honest, fairly gentle walk);

Himmelried
https://c1.staticflickr.com/3/2867/33118105721_fd55b1b570_b.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/SswX1M)

This was taken with a Hasselblad H2, with an 80mm lens and a Phase One P45+ back; first impressions are good, and it's certainly easier to carry this on a hike than the Sinar.

stawastawa
30-Mar-2017, 00:17
finding some spring blooms!

163257

163258

Sony Nex with OM zuiko glass.
critique always welcome.

https://lifeofstawa.wordpress.com/2017/03/30/out-to-sun-and-blooms/

Punker
30-Mar-2017, 01:48
I bought a gentleman's last remaining supply of Macophot IR820C film and an IR gel to put on my film back to negate the need to remove and replace the filter every time.

Bronica ETRSi

https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20170330/b10d457851a4334d2e9636a3e2e6452f.jpghttps://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20170330/efc7d470e6451de797abf0e3c43a5726.jpghttps://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20170330/65f81df1ce088f965261fa8bf5acfc8e.jpg


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

andreios
30-Mar-2017, 01:57
Now that's a clever idea!!

locutus
30-Mar-2017, 03:25
Doesn't that shift the focus point again? same as with a filter mounted on the rear of a lens. Added disadvantage that you cant see this shift in the finder.

Vaughn
30-Mar-2017, 11:14
I do not believe gels affect focus. Thin enough not to bend the light, I guess.

Punker
30-Mar-2017, 12:05
I did a couple focus tests on this roll. With this particular system the lenses focus correctly with no adjustment.

https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20170330/de34f169dc597ac1340b403324cf341a.jpghttps://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20170330/e1e9e9f5ba380d449b069726e839cbaf.jpg

The second shot I adjusted halfway to the IR mark and it made the focus slightly soft. I think depth of field saved it from being a total wash. First shot is without adjustment.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

tgtaylor
31-Mar-2017, 23:01
View along a Bay Area hiking trail:

https://c2.staticflickr.com/4/3857/32954289303_608d796a19_z.jpg

I believe this was taken on a trail in the Los Altos Hills in Santa Clara County.

The elusive and seldom seen but highly photogenic Murrietta Falls in Alameda County:

https://c1.staticflickr.com/3/2864/33638158331_41865779bf_o.jpg

Make sure you have had your Wheaties before starting on this one. http://www.sfgate.com/sports/article/Brutal-hike-to-Murietta-Falls-can-yield-stunning-2662044.php

Both of the above were photographed with a tripod-mounted Nikon F3 camera.

Thomas

xkaes
1-Apr-2017, 04:14
Here's my back and my TOKO (NOT TOYO) 4x5 in Glacier National Park taking a picture of a Bristlecone Pine -- WAY off trail, of course.

163334

Check out: http://www.subclub.org/toko/

And here in an UNRETOUCHED picture from Zion National Park -- with the same camera:

tgtaylor
14-May-2017, 20:27
Here's my back and my TOKO (NOT TOYO) 4x5 in Glacier National Park taking a picture of a Bristlecone Pine -- WAY off trail, of course.

163334

Check out: http://www.subclub.org/toko/

And here in an UNRETOUCHED picture from Zion National Park -- with the same camera:

Do you have a website displaying more of your work?

Thomas

tgtaylor
28-Jun-2017, 20:30
Sunset at Lands End Beach - San Francisco.
http://spiritsofsilver.com/yahoo_site_admin/assets/images/Sumset-Lands-End.178200420_large.jpg

A group of brown pelicans are watching the sunset from the small island in the center. You can just make out the silhouette of their heads against the setting sun. Located at the entrance of the Golden Gate, the beach is no longer accessible except by rappelling.

Fuji Velvia 50, 75mm lens, Pentax 67II.

Thomas

gnuyork
7-Jul-2017, 05:14
http://www.wiseheadproductions.com/ftp/photo/Sigma/Hoxie-april28-1.jpg

jon.oman
7-Jul-2017, 07:31
Sunset at Lands End Beach - San Francisco.
http://spiritsofsilver.com/yahoo_site_admin/assets/images/Sumset-Lands-End.178200420_large.jpg

A group of brown pelicans are watching the sunset from the small island in the center. You can just make out the silhouette of their heads against the setting sun. Located at the entrance of the Golden Gate, the beach is no longer accessible except by rappelling.

Fuji Velvia 50, 75mm lens, Pentax 67II.

Thomas

Very nice image!

ericpmoss
9-Jul-2017, 12:27
167023 This was from somewhere near Linville NC. Maybe the hike to Hawksbill? Sigma Merrill DP2.

stawastawa
10-Jul-2017, 08:28
what an amazing set of clouds and rocks and mountains Eric. how did you manage to compress the tonality so nicely?

tuco
11-Jul-2017, 00:01
Hiking around Fort Rock, Oregon
GSW690III, Retro 80S

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4285/35717759211_2d57cf4234_o.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/WqfRqF)
Fort Rock, Oregon (https://flic.kr/p/WqfRqF) by tuco (https://www.flickr.com/photos/yo_tuco/), on Flickr

ericpmoss
11-Jul-2017, 17:39
what an amazing set of clouds and rocks and mountains Eric. how did you manage to compress the tonality so nicely?

Thanks. I have no idea. Sad, but true. It may just be a "feature" of the DP Merrill sensors and software. The day was overcast enough to not blow out any highlights, so that was probably half the battle. The photo looked bland in the original color, so I just desaturated it, added a little "fill light", which is pretty primitive in the Sigma software, and boosted the contrast a bit. I don't even remember if I had my circular polarizer on at the time.

ericpmoss
11-Jul-2017, 17:48
167149 Here's another Sigma DP2 Merrill image, this one from the "Dog Nipples" area of Zion backcountry. It must have a real name, but I just followed they guy who knew where he was going, and tried to not fall off. I'd love to see what one of you could do with a real camera...

Rael
12-Jul-2017, 02:44
https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3948/33268916770_10f93fb2da_b.jpg
Ercona II, Delta 100. Taken while hiking Spruce Mountain, in NY

tgtaylor
27-Jul-2017, 10:28
Dancing Trees - Tomales Bay State Park, California.

http://spiritsofsilver.com/yahoo_site_admin/assets/images/Untitled_Tomales_State_Park.305114439_large.jpg

Pentax 67II.

Thomas

tgtaylor
27-Jul-2017, 20:32
Crossing Taboose Creek - Taboose Pass Trail Sierra Nevada at elevation 2440m:

167603

This was taken on the east side of Taboose Pass two days ago. That's not me in the picture.

Thomas