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jnanian
29-Aug-2016, 07:32
i have a somewhat large split deck semi centennial stand
its casters squeek and aren't much fun
the woodwork needs to be sanded and refinished ( its missing the plate holder )
the bed needs to be lubricated so it isn't as stiff to open and close and the counterbalance spring needs lubrication ( and a KEY ! )

does anyone have suggestions on how to go about lubricating wood to make it slide better, and re-vulcanizing casters ?
i'd rather not put new casters on it and i am never sure if it is oil or wax or what kind of either i should use to make this gem of a tool work like new again. and the counterbalance .. do you oil long flat spiral springs like that and are the keys to tension the spring
a standard size? i've been using the shaft of a large screwdriver, when i need to, but i'd rather get the real-deal.

any suggestions ?

thanks in advance !
john

lenser
29-Aug-2016, 10:53
I used a very dark walnut product from Old English to refinish both my Century camera and stand.a bit of wd-40 applied to the axles helped with squeaks on all four wheels I left the treads of the metal wheels alone, and I can send you an image of the handle (key) for the spring tensioner if that would help. perhaps the local hardware store can help there once they see what it looks like.

Steven Tribe
29-Aug-2016, 12:03
Photos please! So we can contribute sensibly!

jnanian
29-Aug-2016, 12:07
thanks lenser !

steven, i will try to get to photographing it sometime soon, sorry for my lack of photographs/illustrations -

john

Jac@stafford.net
29-Aug-2016, 12:08
John, there was a recent thread about just this subject.
The root post is below.
Hope this helps.
(http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/showthread.php?132609-Wood-tripod-sticky-sliding-legs&p=1344094&viewfull=1#post1344094)

jnanian
29-Aug-2016, 12:26
thanks jac!
just finished reading it
and i might get some of that wax
and i've got the WD ...

Peter De Smidt
29-Aug-2016, 12:44
In my case, I had to re-glue the table and add a new lead screw and nut. I used t-nuts and bolts instead of just wood screws to hold the mechanism to the table. Other than that, I cleaned all of the wood and then put a coat of Renaissance Wax on it. The metal was a bit rusty. I lightly wire brushed it and then applied Rustoleum Rust Reformer, like at this link: https://www.amazon.com/Rust-Oleum-7830730-8-Ounce-Rust-Reformer/dp/B000BZZ56S/ref=pd_sim_60_6?ie=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=FNHHT2X57AAA8GDKZ3JC I liberally painted it on the metal parts. (The parts were all disassembled.) Originally, I was going to use the RR as a primer, but it gave a nice satin black look to the metal pieces, and so I left it at that.

https://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/3595413/Century_No_7.jpg

Jac@stafford.net
29-Aug-2016, 12:48
thanks jac!
just finished reading it
and i might get some of that wax
and i've got the WD ...

If you mean WD40, please don't use it. It is worthless for anything but purging electronics of moisture in an emergency. It is not a lubricant. It is not a preservative. It is a pretty good cleaning agent, but for our purposes kerosene is better.

Pay attention to Peter De Smidt's advice. If I recall properly he also replicated the table tilt mechanism.
.

jnanian
29-Aug-2016, 13:30
kerosene ... i will look into that :)

wow peter, that is beautiful ...

Robert Brazile
29-Aug-2016, 16:50
Kerosene for cleaning, although it's awfully stinky. Mineral spirits will do almost as well without stinking out the house or garage quite so much.

For lubrication, there are a lot of possibilities. Boeshield T-9 is a combination of light lubricant and rust protection that I like to use on woodworking machinery.

Robert

John Kasaian
29-Aug-2016, 18:44
For wood to wood lubrication, I like to use pure beeswax.
I've had a few candle stubs left over from a hospital chapel (my photography needs all the help I can get) and used them up but I recently got a small chunk from beekeeper at a farmer's market

For metal to metal, Lubriplate product 630-AA is what's recommended for 'dorffs---it's much thicker than regular Lubriplate so it's not going to dribble off onto the wood.

Good luck! It sounds like a really cool project:cool:

John Kasaian
29-Aug-2016, 18:49
If the key you need is square, measure it and see if the hardware store has square stock steel in that dimension. For the handle end of the key you can get as fancy as you want, from a simple bend "L" to wings like a wind up toy.

jnanian
29-Aug-2016, 21:31
For wood to wood lubrication, I like to use pure beeswax.
I've had a few candle stubs left over from a hospital chapel (my photography needs all the help I can get) and used them up but I recently got a small chunk from beekeeper at a farmer's market

For metal to metal, Lubriplate product 630-AA is what's recommended for 'dorffs---it's much thicker than regular Lubriplate so it's not going to dribble off onto the wood.

Good luck! It sounds like a really cool project:cool:

thanks john !
ribbon spring gluing in place as i attempt to type this with sticky gorilla gluie digits!
beeswax! i got some of that:)

now, if i can figure out how to put the puzzle back together .. that i think is the hard part :)

Peter De Smidt
29-Aug-2016, 21:42
Unless the stand is different from mine, I don't see why the metal parts need lubrication.

LabRat
29-Aug-2016, 23:32
thanks john !
ribbon spring gluing in place as i attempt to type this with sticky gorilla gluie digits!
beeswax! i got some of that:)

now, if i can figure out how to put the puzzle back together .. that i think is the hard part :)

Don't use Gorilla Glue... It is strong, but soft, but WAY too messy to use, and does not clean-up well... It will bubble out of the glued joints with it's tell-tail rabid yellow foam, and as soon as you touch it somehow, it will transfer to the next dozen or so things you touch... You will find some on your clothes and it will never come out... It will be on your hands for the next couple of weeks... People will think you have a horrible skin disease... :-( If you clamp it, sometimes it will bubble up in the glued joint and leave a little play in it due to it's softness... And it won't reverse if you ever have to take apart that repair later (where a little moisture or steam will allow other glues to soften)...

Use the standard PVA woodworker's glue... A little wet wipe, and the stain is gone...

Steve K

jnanian
30-Aug-2016, 05:28
hi steve

thanks for the warning !
i've used it before and know to use very little .
(barely a squirt )
when it foams a little bit i take the corner of a wet rag and
wipe it and get very little if any is left on my fingers, and none on my clothes
or anywhere where it isn't supposed to be. to be honest
the last time i used gorilla glue, i used it to repair this same flat metal
spring, and the wood piece came off easily so i could pull the spring broken metal out
and slide this in and glue the wood back on top. ( probably 10 years ago ! )
i'll probably use wood glue next time the spring breaks,
buying glue every time i need it is for the birds, wood glue seems to last a long time
and this repair seems to happen every few years.

===

peter,

the metal i was wondering if i lubricated is the counterbalance spring
(probably wound flat galvanized zinc )
and the metal casters ( rolling solid metal )
... nothing else that is metal really moves... :)

my stand resembles yours a little bit, but it is different.
it doesn't have a wheel to move the bed up and down,
instead it has a wooden handle in back and a metal rod to loosen
and a tension clamp to loosen in front to allow the bed to slide freely up and
down the columns. the ribbon counterbalance springs do all of the work
( when they are both working ) ... the column-caps on mine are sort of decorative, not
hip-capped like yours and there are key holes to wind up the springs.
there is no lock for the back caster ( the casters are just metal wheels )
and the hinged bed has a big screw to tilt it up.
i think the person who owned/used the camera and stand before me took
matters in his/her own hands because i have small hinges on the camera that attach it to the bed
and the metal rod in back too. i have a feeling s/he had a ribbon spring/s break
and s/he needed to make sure the bed didn't slide down but locked into place
and the hinges because when tilted ( i have saw toothed focus handle to lift the camera
and a big wood screw to lift the bed ) there is a lame little bead of wood at the front end
of the tilt bed, which doesn't seem like it was enough to keep the camera
from sliding forward off the front of the stand if it was tilted more than just a little bit.
maybe the rod is original because the springs were known to break ? and the hinges because
the camera was known to slide off the front of the stand? not sure, i've never seen
another 8A or stand like this one before so i can't really compare to anything except
ones i see on-line or in the old sketch-ads for the cameras/stands.

when i get everyting back together i'll try to clear a spot so i can take a photograph of it ..
thanks again
john