PDA

View Full Version : Stable floor mount for 4x5 or 5x7



David Aimone
25-Jul-2016, 18:52
There have been times I would have liked to take photos at or near floor level, and the tripod doesn't go low enough.

What are some options for putting the camera on the floor, but keeping it from moving when making adjustments and operating the camera?

Ari
25-Jul-2016, 19:09
You can invert the centre post on many modern tripods, then get your tripod as low as it will go.

Randy Moe
25-Jul-2016, 19:27
Second post needing movie gear.

Make or buy one of these.

http://www.filmtools.com/cameradept/camera-support/hihats.html

Peter De Smidt
25-Jul-2016, 21:20
It would be easy to make a low base with a 3/16" bolt. Put tripod head on base.

Jac@stafford.net
26-Jul-2016, 06:36
It would be easy to make a low base with a 3/16" bolt. Put tripod head on base.

Yes, and should I go to the shop today, I can post a picture of one I made. (Typo Peter? 3/8"?)

Drew Bedo
26-Jul-2016, 07:52
1) Mount a ball head on a piece of plywood.

2) Shoot straight down into a 45 deg front surface mirror. SEE the Spiratone Circomirrotach.http://www.thecuckoofarm.com/cuckoo/photo/lens/lensacc/spircirco/spircirco.php

MrFujicaman
26-Jul-2016, 08:05
Go get a used disc brake rotor-cut a circle of plywood over the area of the lug bolts-bolt it down. Now drill a hole in the center and mount a tripod head.

Peter De Smidt
26-Jul-2016, 18:23
Yes, and should I go to the shop today, I can post a picture of one I made. (Typo Peter? 3/8"?)

Typo or brain difficulty. ;)

Peter De Smidt
27-Jul-2016, 11:33
http://www.gitzo.us/series-3-aluminum-systematic-2-section-baby-tripod-w-g-lock

Jac@stafford.net
27-Jul-2016, 11:54
I like the disc brake rotor idea.

Peter De Smidt
27-Jul-2016, 13:46
I've got a couple of disk rotors lying around. It is a terrific idea. Glue some edpm rubber to the bottom, and it'll be non-scratch.

Drew Bedo
27-Jul-2016, 14:49
Disk roters would be effective. Does the rig HAVE to be that heavy?

Any thoughts on adding three little thumb-screw legs for leveling?

Peter De Smidt
27-Jul-2016, 19:39
If it's not heavy, one would have to be very careful not to move the rig when making adjustments, inserting film holders.....

Jac@stafford.net
28-Jul-2016, 05:26
Disk roters would be effective. Does the rig HAVE to be that heavy?

Any thoughts on adding three little thumb-screw legs for leveling?

Heavy is okay by me. For leveling surf for pinball leg levelers. Go for the type with composite (rubber like) feet.

MrFujicaman
28-Jul-2016, 08:44
I've got a couple of disk rotors lying around. It is a terrific idea. Glue some edpm rubber to the bottom, and it'll be non-scratch.

I used some rotors to make the base for a background stand. I just went up to the Dollar Tree and bought one of the little foam backed carpet scraps they sell as rugs. One of those makes 2 pads for smaller rotors.

Glue the rotors to the carpet backing and then cut away all the excess.

MrFujicaman
28-Jul-2016, 16:44
Disk roters would be effective. Does the rig HAVE to be that heavy?

Any thoughts on adding three little thumb-screw legs for leveling?

Drew, you'd need solid rotors instead of the far more common "vented" rotors. The vented rotors have spines that create air channels for cooling-it'd be really hard to drill holes in those.

Jac@stafford.net
28-Jul-2016, 16:50
Drew, you'd need solid rotors instead of the far more common "vented" rotors. The vented rotors have spines that create air channels for cooling-it'd be really hard to drill holes in those.

The holes are already drilled. You know, the mounting holes? And since when did vented rotors become most common-place? Not yet. Regardless, irrelevant.

LabRat
28-Jul-2016, 17:55
I have also used brake drums or tire rims for holding uprights in the studio... Has bolt holes in them...

Steve K

MrFujicaman
29-Jul-2016, 08:39
Jac, I've scrounged many of these rotors and the vast majority of them are of the vented type. The holes for the lug bolts are where you have to mount some kind of plate so you have a surface to bolt the tripod head to as the rotors have a hole in the middle for the hub.

If you put the leveling bolts thru the lug bolt holes, I think the thing would be somewhat prone to tipping over.

To see what we're trying to make, find a copy of Irving Penn's "Worlds in a Small Room" and look at the picture at the top of page 60 of Penn using his "floor pod" and then read his notes at the end of the books. In the third paragraph of his notes he says " For very low point-of-view pictures, I used a homemade tripod consisting of a Tiltall head bolted to an 8-inch circular steel plate on 3 spike legs."

While I could buy an 8" steel plate off Ebay ,the shipping cost is generally crazy and I can get disc brake rotors from my mechanic for free.

Peter De Smidt
29-Jul-2016, 09:21
Most rotors around here are solid, from Chevys to Honda Civics. But who cares if they're slotted or drilled? Why should that matter for this purpose? Using some kind of pad or covering on the bottom would aid in preventing slipping on a smooth floor. Just make sure that it's not compressible to cause movement. Or one could epoxy small feet under it, drill through the rotor and bolt on feet, although that sounds like a pain, or run some wood under the rotor to give a place to mount bolts or levelers. The disk would only need to be absolutely level if you're doing stitching.

Another option, if you have them, is to run a bolt through a studio apple crate. Sandbag it if needed....

Jac@stafford.net
29-Jul-2016, 09:23
Jac, I've scrounged many of these rotors and the vast majority of them are of the vented type. [...]See how behind the times I am? I just crawled under my car. Yup, the front rotors are ventilated.

If you put the leveling bolts thru the lug bolt holes, I think the thing would be somewhat prone to tipping over.
It is not difficult to drill discs, so one approach is to drill three equi-spaced holes closer to the edge and then use a ball-socket fastener (http://www.digoliardi.net/low%20platform%20project/articulated-bolt-1.jpg)at the disc so that it angles out, then use another swiveling pad (http://www.digoliardi.net/low%20platform%20project/tilting-leveling-legs-1.jpg) at the end of each. (The pics give a rough idea) Kinda like a 50's flying saucer prop.
To see what we're trying to make, find a copy of Irving Penn's "Worlds in a Small Room" and look at the picture at the top of page 60 of Penn using his "floor pod" and then read his notes at the end of the books. [...]
Okay, that's on my To Find list. I might go to one of our libraries today.

While I could buy an 8" steel plate off Ebay ,the shipping cost is generally crazy and I can get disc brake rotors from my mechanic for free.
Good plan!

MrFujicaman
8-Aug-2016, 15:07
Okay, I figured out by looking at Ebay why there are so few solid disc brake rotors around. Solid disc's seem to be mainly used on rear brakes and you have to replace rear brake parts far less than you do front brakes as the front brakes do most of the braking.

Randy Moe
8-Aug-2016, 20:03
I bought a patio umbrella cast iron base from Aldi. $15, no rust, no grease to clean. It was clearance priced. It must weigh 50 lbs, put it on my scooter and rode it home.

Very heavy, also works as light stand base. 3" high, has a thumb screw and tube that can mount almost anything. I stick a Junior C-Stand adapter in there or solid bar.

It could hold ULF camera at 4" high. I can also mount a Majestic head right to it...

Brake rotors are nasty.

jp
10-Aug-2016, 11:19
My Ries J tripod goes right down to the ground. I'd probably try the brake rotor thing if I didn't have the tripod.

A plate with some spikes in it would work too as something to attach a tripod head to. Maybe a homeplate? https://www.amazon.com/Champro-Spike-Home-Plate-White/dp/B004TX3OUC

Jac@stafford.net
10-Aug-2016, 11:58
I bought a patio umbrella cast iron base from Aldi. $15, no rust, no grease to clean. It was clearance priced. It must weigh 50 lbs [... snip good stuff ...]

Here we buy the heavy-duty composite stands that weigh very little, but fill with sand when we get home to weigh 50 pounds or more. My place is practically a river island - very sandy. Then I recall living in Chicago where we had to BUY sand unless we walked to the lake front and schlepped it home. :)

mdarnton
10-Aug-2016, 18:58
Something today from Petapixel: http://petapixel.com/2016/08/08/diy-tip-use-cheap-frying-pan-better-low-angle-shots/
Probably for LF we'd want to go with cast iron.

And back in the real world. . . . . I have a short column for my Manfrotto 3021/055 tripods; it's about 6" long or so. The tripod is comfortable enough with a 4x5 or lighter 5x7 on it, and has three-stop leg spread, the widest click of which puts the tail of that short column almost right down on the ground. If you don't need the variable six inches of elevation of the short column, the plug pulls out of the bottom long column and mounts the camera or head directly on the tripod spider. I guess most LF tripods don't have this type of variable-locking spreading legs, but I find them handy in all sorts of situations, and these tripods get a lot of use.

All I have at home tonight is a Graflex, but here's an illustration with the short plug and my lowest tripod head. I guess you could skip the head and get another four inches lower, if you wanted.

https://c3.staticflickr.com/9/8743/28285243914_d0e964c8f8_z.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/K6tgzd)
low-boy (https://flic.kr/p/K6tgzd)
Michael Darnton (https://www.flickr.com/photos/michaeldarnton/), on Flickr

Jac@stafford.net
11-Aug-2016, 06:03
Michael, may I ask what tripod head that is?

jp
11-Aug-2016, 06:23
Michael, may I ask what tripod head that is?

Looks like a 3025 head. (I use one with my Ries)

mdarnton
11-Aug-2016, 06:28
The view is a bit muddled because there's a camera strap hanging down that looks like part of the head. As JP says, it's the Manfrotto 3D- #3025. It's rated for 6.6 pounds, but will handle a bit more. That rig is fine for my 5x7 Korona, but my 5x7 Agfa-Ansco is a bit much for it--mainly because of the horizontal size plus weight factor. The Graflex weighs 6#2oz but is mostly vertical and so it isn't scary at all. Basically, it does what I wish a ball head would do, with the exception of not having a bit of damping. It's light, and compact when folded up. It's available with knobs or flipper locks and with or without a quick release. Mine is this one: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/used/5258/

Jac@stafford.net
11-Aug-2016, 07:15
OHMgosh. I have one, too but have not used it in a long time. Did not recognize it. Thank you.

David Aimone
23-Aug-2016, 18:26
what about adapting something like the bottom of this mic stand (https://amzn.com/B0018TAITA)?

154255

Alan Gales
26-Aug-2016, 21:38
There have been times I would have liked to take photos at or near floor level, and the tripod doesn't go low enough.

What are some options for putting the camera on the floor, but keeping it from moving when making adjustments and operating the camera?

Duct Tape.

MrFujicaman
25-Sep-2016, 15:03
okay-

Here are 2 shots of my mostly complete floor pod155536155537

I figure I have about $5 invest in it-mainly in paint, carpet for the bottom so it doesn't tear up floors etc.

I used socket bolts to hold the wooden disc to the brake rotor because that's what I had on hand.

the head is from a Gitzo tripod I bought some years back

MrFujicaman
15-Jul-2017, 07:49
Okay, it's a gloomy morning and I was looking at photo sites on the net. I went to www.rangefinderforum.com and started looking at the Gallery section. There's a picture there of a Rollei with a magnifying finder mounted on a Tiltall head bolted to a round steel plate, inside a lexan case like you'd find in a museum.

I'm 90% sure this is a picture of the camera Irving Penn used in "Worlds In A Small Room"

MrFujicaman
15-Jul-2017, 10:01
AH-HA....! The guy who posted the picture said in another post that it was taken at an Irving Penn exhibit in NYC.

stawastawa
15-Jul-2017, 10:53
but no one linked the image to here?
how is your floor pod working MrFujicaman?

MrFujicaman
15-Jul-2017, 11:15
Haven't used it much, but it works well.

MrFujicaman
15-Jul-2017, 11:19
Go to www.rangefinderforum.com and look under Nikon Historical Socity

David Lobato
15-Jul-2017, 11:43
Many times I have used my 4x5 for ground level wild flowers and mushrooms. Reversing the tripod center post so that the camera is under the 3 legs does not work for a few reasons. It's near impossible to fit in a film holder with the legs and the ground so close to the edge of the back. Your nicely composed photo is not possible without a way to put the film holder in. Then the lens has to point between two legs, which places the third leg obstructing the ground glass. Try to get your face and a loupe in there, and manage a dark cloth. The best solution is to mount the camera on top of a low profile support. The aforementioned disk brake rotor sounds good. There are very short tripods available as well. I (mostly) solved my problem with a short center column for my Gitzo Studex. My Toyo 45AR with the rotating back helped a bit but there were still situations where it wasn't enough to work out.