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pound
23-Jul-2016, 23:04
Has this been shared before? anyway it is nice to see a 12x20 ULF photographer in action. From shooting to printing.

https://youtu.be/0tlgk6pmXyA

Definitely need a good cart with big wheels. Just look at 00:34

Randy Moe
24-Jul-2016, 03:27
Great video!

No computer needed!

Thx

Pali K
24-Jul-2016, 08:25
Really enjoyed the video! Thanks for sharing.

Pali

Will Whitaker
24-Jul-2016, 11:23
....Definitely need a good cart with big wheels. Just look at 00:34

And a chainsaw and some nut-waders.

Greg
24-Jul-2016, 16:43
Very interesting since I am about to start printing 11x14 Platinum/Palladium prints. Largest up to now has been 8x10. Admire his brush coating technique.

Is he using an Arca-Swiss quick release plate? Have been using the 3/8" tripod screw up to now which at times is tricky to balance the camera to center the tripod screw hole.

His using a hot air dryer without breathing protection just scares the hell out of me. Someone should tell him that is anything but a safe practice to do health wise. I've spent hundreds of dollars and many hours constructing an exhaust fan hood over the counter where I coat my paper and I let it air dry. Even with my exhaust fan (made for darkrooms) and the hood will not heat dry the paper without confirming that no heavy metals are becoming airborne inside the darkroom and close to 100% exhausted to the outside.

Emmanuel BIGLER
25-Jul-2016, 15:30
Hello from France!

Since I know Thierry MoŽnne-Loccoz personnally, I can ask him about his dovetail system.

The place where the picture is taken is named "Cascade des Tufs", near Arbois, Jura, France.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arbois
"Tuf" means a mixture of limestone and kind of algae that grows in waterfalls.
In the Jura mountain range, limestone is dominant among rocks, and several waterfalls exhibit this kind of naturally-grown material.

Christopher Barrett
25-Jul-2016, 16:56
It looks a bit like the Kessler QR plate that Kirk Gittings has been using... http://www.kesslercrane.com/kwik-release I use a variety of dovetails and quick releases on my cine gear and they have the perfect robustness for ULF. I'm surprised that this gear hasn't made it into ULF/LF more.

pound
25-Jul-2016, 18:24
Hello from France!

Since I know Thierry MoŽnne-Loccoz personnally, I can ask him about his dovetail system.

The place where the picture is taken is named "Cascade des Tufs", near Arbois, Jura, France.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arbois
"Tuf" means a mixture of limestone and kind of algae that grows in waterfalls.
In the Jura mountain range, limestone is dominant among rocks, and several waterfalls exhibit this kind of naturally-grown material.
wow.thank you for letting us know who this photographer is. I was wondering could he be a member of this forum. The place is beautiful, definitely worth the hike in.

Greg
26-Jul-2016, 16:44
It looks a bit like the Kessler QR plate that Kirk Gittings has been using... http://www.kesslercrane.com/kwik-release I use a variety of dovetails and quick releases on my cine gear and they have the perfect robustness for ULF. I'm surprised that this gear hasn't made it into ULF/LF more.

Thank you for that info on Kessler products. The Kwik Release Receiver and either the larger Slider or Utility plates seem like they would work excellently with my 11x14. Many years ago was in the middle of a stream and had a Rollei SL-66 with lens and prism finder slip off Rollei's proprietary quick release mount and fall into water below. Since then have always been a bit hesitant about using any quick release tripod equipment that wasn't times 2 failsafe.
Greg

angusparker
7-Aug-2016, 22:04
Very interesting since I am about to start printing 11x14 Platinum/Palladium prints. Largest up to now has been 8x10. Admire his brush coating technique.

Is he using an Arca-Swiss quick release plate? Have been using the 3/8" tripod screw up to now which at times is tricky to balance the camera to center the tripod screw hole.

His using a hot air dryer without breathing protection just scares the hell out of me. Someone should tell him that is anything but a safe practice to do health wise. I've spent hundreds of dollars and many hours constructing an exhaust fan hood over the counter where I coat my paper and I let it air dry. Even with my exhaust fan (made for darkrooms) and the hood will not heat dry the paper without confirming that no heavy metals are becoming airborne inside the darkroom and close to 100% exhausted to the outside.

Agreed. He should be using an exhaust fan. I think using a hairdryer on "fan" setting and not heat is fine IMHO if you have good ventilation system.

Andre Noble
8-Aug-2016, 13:25
I think one has to be practical about tripod placement with $10,000 worth of gear potentially taking a soak.

tgtaylor
8-Aug-2016, 21:44
I like the idea of defining the coating parameters with rulers and will adopt that in my own work when printing 5x7 negatives on 8x10 paper. It should result in more even size boarders.

Thomas

pound
9-Aug-2016, 09:12
I think this video has been shared before but it is quite inspiring to watch again. If I were to take a trek up to the hills with such equipment, I would be proud of any shots that I might took. Just for the efforts!


https://youtu.be/fwI5By945R0

Fr. Mark
29-Aug-2016, 15:48
Inspiring videos. Are we really worried about volatilizing metal salts with hot air blown over them? Is there data that they get loose or are we having chemo-phobia? I was an organic chemist and I was under the impression that most metal/salt compounds would decompose (and still not volatilize the metals) at temperatures you can't get to with a hair drier and if you volatilized them, you'd need a torch which would be the end of the expensive paper. I could be wrong and I do want people to treat heavy metal compounds with respect, but I still have my doubts its a big deal.

Jim Noel
29-Aug-2016, 19:40
I guess I am not as healthy as the doctors say, since I have been using a hair dryer to dry my coated papers for more than 60 years.

Randy Moe
29-Aug-2016, 20:10
I'll go with that Jim.

tgtaylor
30-Aug-2016, 09:47
Are we really worried about volatilizing metal salts with hot air blown over them? Is there data that they get loose or are we having chemo-phobia? I was an organic chemist and I was under the impression that most metal/salt compounds would decompose (and still not volatilize the metals) at temperatures you can't get to with a hair drier and if you volatilized them, you'd need a torch which would be the end of the expensive paper. I could be wrong and I do want people to treat heavy metal compounds with respect, but I still have my doubts its a big deal.

It's been a while since college chemistry which I didn't major in but took along with physics for a degree in mathematics but I recall that atoms are in a state of constant flux - they constantly vibrate and bump into one another and each collision results in kinetic energy being exchanged. As a result of these collisions some of the atoms are close to the kinetic energy required to escape from the surrounding medium which the hair dryer provides.

Thomas

Fr. Mark
30-Aug-2016, 17:14
It's been a while since college chemistry which I didn't major in but took along with physics for a degree in mathematics but I recall that atoms are in a state of constant flux - they constantly vibrate and bump into one another and each collision results in kinetic energy being exchanged. As a result of these collisions some of the atoms are close to the kinetic energy required to escape from the surrounding medium which the hair dryer provides.

Thomas

Someone with more credentials than I have may disagree, but in a word, "no." Otherwise everything (rocks, steel implements, glass etc etc) would evaporate. What you said is true of some simple compounds with lower molecular weights and relatively lower intermolecular forces, even water. But many covalently bonded materials, particularly polymers, and ionic materials, too, just aren't going to volatilizatize at temperatures most people can generate at home with or without a welding torch. These materials will demonstrate molecular vibration and you could take in dangerous quantities of powders of metals (and other things) particularly when humidity is low.