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barnacle
5-Jun-2016, 02:57
Anyone made such an animal and would care to share the details? In particular, what are good materials for the dark slide itself? As always, I'm on a restricted budget for this and don't really want to fork out a hundred bucks for a single darkslide, as I'll have to build the camera as well.

I want to play with 8x10 x-ray film with either pinhole or a lens, and the latter requires some sort of focussing and ideally a camera that isn't restricted to a single shot in a shoebox!

Thanks,

Neil

Michael E
5-Jun-2016, 13:25
IMO, for a format as common as 8x10", building a film holder doesn't make any sense. Used film holders are easily available, starting at $30. You can't beat that.

barnacle
5-Jun-2016, 13:58
At $30, no argument. I was seeing prices significantly greater, but I'll keep an eye out.

Thanks.

Neil

Jac@stafford.net
5-Jun-2016, 14:02
Your endeavor, however laudable, is bound to fail. Suck it up and find a manufactured back compatible with the format, and a standard film holder and be happy.
.

Kevin Harding
5-Jun-2016, 17:38
I'm used to seeing prices around $100 (CAD) per holder, but I think that if I were to try to make one, it wouldn't work and would cost more.

However, I won't dare tell you to suck it up - no need ;)

Tim Meisburger
5-Jun-2016, 19:16
Nobody seems very interested in making holders. I'm not sure why, as developing a process and tooling up would make it easily possible to fabricate any format holder, and given the prices of ULF holders, such an investment might easily pay for itself. To mass produce stock you would need two or three shaper bits. Otherwise, take an old wooden 4x5 holder apart and duplicate the parts in 8x10, but it will be a lot of work for a one-off.

If you just want something to use, it would be easiest to make a holder ignoring standards, but then you will need to make the back to fit the holder, so the ground glass is in the correct plane.

David Lobato
5-Jun-2016, 19:24
Old derelict 8x10 cameras can be found for little cost. They have found me a few times. All you need is the removable back. Ugly 8x10 film holders go for low cost. Look for older wooden ones too, they are reasonably priced. Caution, dipping your toe into the 8x10 waters can lead to further immersion into 8x10.

barnacle
5-Jun-2016, 22:46
The theory is to make something big enough for Granddaughter to make a couple of images with. It may still end up as a biscuit tin and a pinhole!

Tim's idea of ignoring standards is what I was working on; there seem to be so many to choose from... one piece of Tufnol for the back, one for the slide, two F-shaped bits to hold the film, one F-shaped bit to tape a hinge to, and a haven't-quite-worked-the-shape-out-yet shaped bit to let the dark slide in and out. Replicate much of that to make a double sided holder.

It's still not a plan, though, yet, more of a mental experiment.

Neil

Tim Meisburger
6-Jun-2016, 01:18
The pile side of velcro can (apparently) be used as a light trap for the dark slide. I say apparently because I've heard of doing that, but never done it myself.

jnanian
6-Jun-2016, 03:24
i've made them before ...
book style
there is a "mask" that folds over the film ( or paper ) that folds over from one side .
and another thicker piece that folds over from the other
both the back material and the topmost fold-over are made of
4ply mat board, the mask is made of 1ply. the dark slide is made of 1 ply and slides between the 2 layers.
i've made these for 11x14 as well as smaller sizes, and used them with film as well as paper, glass and metal
they don't leak and are easy to make ..

Ray Heath
6-Jun-2016, 14:56
G'day Neil,
I've made quite a few from 3mm MDF.

Mine are single channel, meaning that the dark slide runs in same channel as that which holds the film.

I've made them in several sizes; 5x4, 5x8, 5x10, 8x8, 8x10 and 11x14.

The tone of this thread seems to be somewhat negative and demeaning. Ignore that, just have a go.

151528

MAubrey
6-Jun-2016, 15:35
Give it a go!

I'm making 11x14 and 14x14 holders right now.

Will Frostmill
6-Jun-2016, 20:21
If you want to simply the light trap problem, you could use a captive darkslide. If it never comes out all the way, you don't need to lightblock the gap.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

jnanian
7-Jun-2016, 04:08
G'day Neil,
I've made quite a few from 3mm MDF.

Mine are single channel, meaning that the dark slide runs in same channel as that which holds the film.

I've made them in several sizes; 5x4, 5x8, 5x10, 8x8, 8x10 and 11x14.

The tone of this thread seems to be somewhat negative and demeaning. Ignore that, just have a go.

151528

+1

great stuff you have made ray !

barnacle
7-Jun-2016, 12:30
Cheers, guys!

Nice idea, Will.

Neil

rosshj
8-Oct-2016, 20:39
I made mine out of layers of .25" MDF. You could also use wood. I made the ground glass holder the same way. This way it was super easy to make sure the ground glass was on the same plane as the film/paper/plates.

Here's a photo of it https://www.instagram.com/p/BGnsieilWDW/

LarsAC
12-Oct-2016, 14:09
Has simeone tried to 3d print holders?

Lars

el french
13-Oct-2016, 12:51
Has simeone tried to 3d print holders?

Lars

I would, but need a detailed drawing.

MartinP
14-Oct-2016, 06:30
The theory is to make something big enough for Granddaughter to make a couple of images with. It may still end up as a biscuit tin and a pinhole!

This is a noble aim. The main advantage of using a DDS instead of a darkroom-loaded, single-shot camera is convenience. So . . . how about a falling plate camera instead? That would give five or six shots which should be enough for anybody (hahahah). There is a clear example of the design principles by Joe van Cleave, HERE (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bY5sATO4V1E).

The camera doesn't have to be pinhole of course, but with a lens you might want to have a more precise way of positioning the film-holder-plates. For the 'plates' I'd suggest mounting-board and the negs could be either film or paper. Using small photo-corner like fittings at the bottom of the plate and a little bit of masking tape at the top worked - but perhaps this sort of thing is not the camera to take out for a morning jogging session. Using 5x7" paper negs and a stopped down magnifier-lens, together with contact-prints made under a light-bulb, would probably do the job you describe.

Good luck!