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cuypers1807
20-May-2016, 06:47
Can anyone recommend a modern studio camera stand that works well with an 8x10? (Chamonix 8x10 to be specific)
I would probably prefer a base with wheels.

Lou Baleur
20-May-2016, 07:07
http://mammothcamera.com/mccacc.html

A modern bi-post stand, custom designed to your needs.

Peter De Smidt
20-May-2016, 07:23
Foba, Cambo....

jnanian
20-May-2016, 07:26
cambo soiid as a rock

Jac@stafford.net
20-May-2016, 07:27
http://mammothcamera.com/mccacc.html

A modern bi-post stand, custom designed to your needs.
That certainly looks robust, and the later break-down design is attractive. Add a pull bar and you have a nice mobile transport, too.

I might be wrong, but the four wheels concern me largely because I'm clumsy and mildly handicapped in one leg. I wonder if regular users might find they interfere. Do they?

The stand I use, an Arkay Regal mono stand, has three wheels in a triangular base and is good for 8x10. (But I got lucky and bought it at an auction sell-off of a large studio. $25. I felt like a thief.)

Thank you for that link.

Tracy Storer
20-May-2016, 08:16
Hi, I made those stands. They are based on the 20x24s that Polaroid built in the 1970s, and are necessarily massive. In practice, the 20x24 overhangs both the front and back of the stand, so, there is (virtually) no trip hazard. (I've been working with the originals for 30 years and have never tripped over the base)

I think for an 8x10 a 3 wheeled base would be a great idea, and everything else would be smaller as well. Unfortunately, these stands, as I build them, are pretty pricey($4-5K for one for a 20x24). A much smaller stand would be less, I can't say at the moment where the $ would fall.

I think an Arkay stand would do well for an 8x10 field, or go beefier and get a Cambo/Foba type stand, they are, as another poster mentioned, rock solid(but much harder to move).



That certainly looks robust, and the later break-down design is attractive. Add a pull bar and you have a nice mobile transport, too.

I might be wrong, but the four wheels concern me largely because I'm clumsy and mildly handicapped in one leg. I wonder if regular users might find they interfere. Do they?

The stand I use, an Arkay Regal mono stand, has three wheels in a triangular base and is good for 8x10. (But I got lucky and bought it at an auction sell-off of a large studio. $25. I felt like a thief.)

Thank you for that link.

Randy Moe
20-May-2016, 08:31
My Arkay works well up to 20 lbs. Best for 15 lbs. they are easy to shorten for low ceilings, but expensive to make taller.

I almost dumped a big camera on first attempt, as you need to keep anything more than 5 lbs centered over the front V legs. Which is obvious afterwards. :)

cuypers1807
20-May-2016, 08:43
Thank you all for the info. Randy, which model of Arkay so you have?

Randy Moe
20-May-2016, 08:57
Thank you all for the info. Randy, which model of Arkay so you have?

I have 2 of these, one is not labelled, the other has a sticker, 'Mono-Stand'. They have the heavy lead counterweight.

I paid $200 for 2 with good Majestic heads as nobody wanted them 4 years ago.

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/187581-REG/Arkay_60242403_10MS_III_Mono_Stand_Sr.html/prm/alsVwDtl

cowanw
20-May-2016, 09:20
Majestic tripods on wheels are also a good choice.
It may help to say where you are.

Jac@stafford.net
20-May-2016, 10:03
[...] In practice, the 20x24 overhangs both the front and back of the stand, so, there is (virtually) no trip hazard. [...]

I should have realized that. Good stuff. Thanks.

Peter De Smidt
20-May-2016, 10:30
Another options is a Quick Set Samson on a rolling base, along with their big geared head. I have one, and it's very solid. I see them available on craigslist and other places for very little money. The height adjustment will be narrower than a true studio stand, but they are very easy to move around.

cuypers1807
20-May-2016, 19:52
Randy, it looks like the Arkay stand you linked to is the one with the 10 foot column? I am guessing that I probably only need the 6 foot column. The B&H listings don't really say other than the number at the beginning of the model number.

Randy Moe
20-May-2016, 21:09
That's just an example. I think they are out of production. You want it as tall as your studio can handle, then as I wrote shorten to fit. You could try a WTB ad here or local Crsigslist. Last year a there were 20 for sale at a closing studio. One location. There are plenty for sale all over USA.


Randy, it looks like the Arkay stand you linked to is the one with the 10 foot column? I am guessing that I probably only need the 6 foot column. The B&H listings don't really say other than the number at the beginning of the model number.

cuypers1807
21-May-2016, 15:44
Thanks Randy!

Alan Gales
21-May-2016, 16:30
If you want it cheap, studio stands occasionally show up on Craigslist.

Michael Graves
21-May-2016, 17:15
Personally, I have a Cambo UST. It is a marvelous stand that I picked up from a local photographer who was retiring. To transport it home, I had to put the 9 foot tube on top of our Nissan Xterra. All the way home, I could gauge my speed by the pitch and volume of the sound it made as the air blew through. In retrospect, the ride probably would have been more comfortable had I stuffed a towel into the front.

That being said, since then, I've seen two or three of these come up. Sometimes people are trying to get close to new price for them. Twice, I've seen them go for under $500 and one of them was $250.00. They're built like tanks, glide smoothly and effortlessly over a studio floor, but lock down to total immobility when the wheels are locked. The counter-weighted arm means you can raise and lower an 8x10 camera with the tips of your fingers.

Sorry. Mine's not for sale. I'm still not dead yet.

Randy Moe
21-May-2016, 18:39
Personally, I have a Cambo UST. It is a marvelous stand that I picked up from a local photographer who was retiring. To transport it home, I had to put the 9 foot tube on top of our Nissan Xterra. All the way home, I could gauge my speed by the pitch and volume of the sound it made as the air blew through. In retrospect, the ride probably would have been more comfortable had I stuffed a towel into the front.

That being said, since then, I've seen two or three of these come up. Sometimes people are trying to get close to new price for them. Twice, I've seen them go for under $500 and one of them was $250.00. They're built like tanks, glide smoothly and effortlessly over a studio floor, but lock down to total immobility when the wheels are locked. The counter-weighted arm means you can raise and lower an 8x10 camera with the tips of your fingers.

Sorry. Mine's not for sale. I'm still not dead yet.

Those are nice, but one has to take what one finds, if you want a bargain.

Some guy around here has a Foba and cannot sell it for his waay too high a price.

When I got mine I was still on crutches and the 2 pros were in such a hurry to sell, they happily broke them down and loaded them. I think they would have driven me home!

cuypers1807 I suggest you find out how to disassemble them safely before you buy. The basic 'trick is to put the arm at the very top and tip the whole thing sideways on the floor. Disconnect the cable at the arm and slowly pull the HEAVY lead weight out the bottom while the finger killer is still sideways on the floor.

One more thing, you definitely want one with the big lead weight to handle an 8X10. I suggest as tall as your space allows as it is common to store the camera way up there out of the way and away from the Bellow's monster. I push mine all the way up, whenever done.

They are also very useful as big copy stands, best copy stand I have had so far. Folding table under and studio lights. I also built a plywood shelf on the arm for darkslides and such.

Another caveat I found out the hard way. The wheeled base is cast iron seems strong, the pipe is tube steel all good, but the arm is aluminum and I cracked one of mine where it clamps the round Majestic Head mount. I was trying to adapt a Saltzman head and got carried away. I fixed it a through bolt and went back to Majestic head. Saltzman head was overkill and I sold it.

I also hung a 40" LED TV from the arm for DSLR studio work. A 40" vertical monitor is great for tether.

MrFujicaman
22-May-2016, 08:31
Another source for the Arkay stands is a doctors office that's closing. Arkay also sold them as stands for a x-ray machine of some kind. The camera club I belonged to had one our VP pulled out of the trash behind a shuttered doctors office. We had to have a adapter made for the arm so we could mount a tripod head on it, but it worked fine once we did that.

Jac@stafford.net
22-May-2016, 10:23
Another source for the Arkay stands is a doctors office that's closing. Arkay also sold them as stands for a x-ray machine of some kind.

Good tip. I think you mean R.K. Industries. It is a cool mobile stand.

Harold_4074
25-May-2016, 13:34
Disconnect the cable at the arm and slowly pull the HEAVY lead weight out the bottom while the finger killer is still sideways on the floor.

Excellent point, well taken.

And if the counterweight is lead (more modern ones use steel, which cuts into the range of vertical travel) check to see how the cable is attached. My Deardorff bi-post stand has two lead weights, and one of them spontaneously detached itself from the cable while the stand was upright. Fortunately, no one's fingers were underneath, but investigation showed that the weights were hung by 1/4" lag eyes (meant for wood, not lead) and a previous owner had tried to "correct" the looseness with epoxy (or, possibly, Duco cement).

I took out both lag eyes and installed brass threaded inserts for 3/8-16 eyebolts; this gives me the bearing strength of a 1/2" wood-style thread in the lead, which should be a decent margin of safety.

And by the way: when turning the stand upright again, keep fingers and other fragile objects away from the cable. It would be pretty easy to semi-amputate something by putting it between a small cable and rigid object, with that big weight hanging down.

Randy Moe
25-May-2016, 13:46
Disconnect the cable at the arm and slowly pull the HEAVY lead weight out the bottom while the finger killer is still sideways on the floor.

Excellent point, well taken.

And if the counterweight is lead (more modern ones use steel, which cuts into the range of vertical travel) check to see how the cable is attached. My Deardorff bi-post stand has two lead weights, and one of them spontaneously detached itself from the cable while the stand was upright. Fortunately, no one's fingers were underneath, but investigation showed that the weights were hung by 1/4" lag eyes (meant for wood, not lead) and a previous owner had tried to "correct" the looseness with epoxy (or, possibly, Duco cement).

I took out both lag eyes and installed brass threaded inserts for 3/8-16 eyebolts; this gives me the bearing strength of a 1/2" wood-style thread in the lead, which should be a decent margin of safety.

And by the way: when turning the stand upright again, keep fingers and other fragile objects away from the cable. It would be pretty easy to semi-amputate something by putting it between a small cable and rigid object, with that big weight hanging down.

Harold,

My Bi-Post was made the same way, but i left the OE 'mistake' alone and I think about it every time I move the stand/camera. My lag screws looked 'OK' but that was a poor OE choice. Maybe next winter I will do what you did.

My 10X10 FOTAR nearly removed the hand of a foolish young man dismantling it for me at the camera store i bought it from. It could have been real bad, but 3 of us somehow got his hand loose. Thin aircraft cable with real heavy weight on it.

They were the experts and it was still inside their store. During reassembly I learned a bit.

Harold_4074
25-May-2016, 14:22
Given that this thread is actually about modern studio stands, the lead weight issues may be only marginally relevant. However, given the prices of new stands suitable for an 8x10, there is a pretty good chance that someone will be bringing home an older used stand, and even a steel weight may be weakly attached.

Therefore, when transporting a stand, the safest mode is undoubtedly with the column lying horizontally and the weight removed.

The LEAST SAFE way would be standing vertically in the bed of a pickup truck, with the carriage lowered and the weight suspended high up in the column. Lightly loaded pickups usually ride roughly, and the impact loads on the cable will do nothing any good.

Presumably, the middle course would be to raise the carriage until the weight bottoms out (not always possible) and stand it up in that position. (It might look strange going down the road, but remember that the counterweight weighs considerably more than the carriage sans[I] camera, so it is actually relatively stable in that configuration.)

Remember that even if the assembly arrives intact, it may have been weakened by mis-handling. After all, 50% of the weights on my bi-post stand [I]hadn't fallen off by themselves before the stand was put into service. Given that the stand will elevate the camera higher than my head, I wouldn't like to experimentally determine whether or not one weight is enough to hold up both the carriage and camera...

(Randy's comment about the OEM lag eyes surprised me, as I had always assumed the original attachment to have been a 1/4-20 tapped hole which later stripped out, possibly due to vertical transportation as described above or to over-tightening of a locknut on the eyebolt shank.)

cuypers1807
25-May-2016, 19:12
Randy, Thanks for the info. Due to my ceiling height, 8 ft would probably be as high as I could go. For what I shoot 6 ft. still may be reasonable.
Going to search for local sales for a while before I consider something new.