PDA

View Full Version : Northern Michigan - Minnesota



johnmsanderson
2-Apr-2016, 20:26
Heading through these regions on the way to Chicago.

Any recommendations on interesting sections?

Industrial - Railroad - Eccentric Nature - Long views is my vibe - Mining history/sites?

BruceO
6-Apr-2016, 15:06
In Michigan UP you will probably find the most interesting stuff in the Keweenaw peninsula. There are some mining remains near Calumet and Laurium, also Freda which is just west of Houghton. Pretty sure this is not on the way to anywhere, however. Feel free to hit me up with any questions.

Wayne
6-Apr-2016, 16:58
Just to be helpful, Minnesota is not on the route from New York to Chicago. :)

I second the Keweenaw. Just drive around, you'll find stuff. The towns of the Keweenaw (and many all over the western UP) have some epic old brownstones and plenty of mine ruins and old houses/homesteads scattered around them. You might find the industrial waterfront of Duluth-Superior to your liking. There's shiny restored trains in the Depot Museum (https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0ahUKEwiKspLxmvvLAhVivYMKHUmNBQwQFggjMAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.lsrm.org%2F&usg=AFQjCNFQm6yS67x-zIUUDytfuLXFhtKucA&sig2=hqYkqATeVvJkqk1RwoGICg) and sometimes rusty graffitti covered ones laying around on sidings south of there. There's a RR bridge that crosses the St Louis River, and trains bring taconite ore from the Iron Range to the docks in Two Harbors. If you like railroads, industry and mines you might like some of the big ships that come into Duluth.

Willie
6-Apr-2016, 19:38
Be sure to watch the movie FARGO a few times before you hit Minnesota so you will be ready for the "yooper" accent.

Willie
6-Apr-2016, 19:39
Be sure to watch the movie FARGO a few times before you hit Minnesota so you will be ready for the "yooper" accent.
If they ask why you are visiting tell them it is your favorite movie and you just had to visit and see if they really talk like that and to see Babe, the Blue Ox.

Old_Dick
7-Apr-2016, 08:48
Just an addition to Wayne's suggestions. If you are going that far out your way, the "North Shore", from Duluth to Canada is very scenic. Waterfalls and cliffs, reminds me of Maine, without the salt air and tides. The "iron range" is very different from out east, head to Chisholm, old iron mines, all around. Grab some potica while your out there, great with breakfast.

Randy Moe
7-Apr-2016, 10:21
A few years ago I rode a Sportster around Lake Superior from Chicago. The north route from NYC is very great. You must know Quebec City. All along the St Lawrence Seaway is interesting to me. I like old stone, iron bridges with passing ships.

Thunder Bay has a cool hotel, where I watched 911 occur. http://www.princearthurwaterfront.com/ Halifax is right on the way...:)

Highway 61 of Bob Dylan fame is the below mentioned North Shore Drive in Minnesota, land of my birth.

Try Milwaukee for really great industrial sites, but they made it difficult with the new highways. You need to get inside and under Milwaukee to get 3 to 5 layer city views.

If you stop in Chicago, please visit or we can meet in City for coffee.

HMG
7-Apr-2016, 18:48
The north shore (MN) of Lake Superior is beautiful. A few wonderful rivers flowing into Lake Superior (Gooseberry, Temperance, Pigeon, Beaver). A number of scenic waterfalls (http://gowaterfalling.com/waterfalls/maps/minnesotanorthshore.shtml) near the highway (61) or a short hike. There's Split Rock lighthouse. And the Duluth waterfront.

I'm sure you'll find the typical info sites by googling, but here's one that might not come up: http://shta.org/ It's mostly focused on hiking but will provide some info on parking along 61 and routes/distances to waterfalls.

A bit of a detour, but some interesting mining towns (Chisholm, Eveleth, Hibbing, Virginia). These aren't "deserted" towns, but you can see some of the older buildings.

I've never used it, but I believe this community darkroom in Duluth (http://www.duluthartinstitute.org/artist-services/darkroom) is operating. And there is Mpls Photo Center (http://www.mplsphotocenter.com/) (where I help out) in Minneapolis.

South from Duluth, along the St. Croix is also very scenic. Of course, you might go east along the south shore of Lake Superior and by Bayfield and the Apostle Islands.

As far as the Fargo movie, the title comes from the fact that the hired killers were from Fargo. It's takes place in Brainerd (where I'm sitting right now) in the late 80s. In terms of its portrayal of the personalities of people in the area back then, it's so spot on you can consider it a documentary.

Randy Moe
7-Apr-2016, 19:37
LOL I had an uncle who as Northern Minnesota County sheriff fit both sides of the coin.

I hated Fargo the movie. Sorry I ever saw it.



In terms of its portrayal of the personalities of people in the area back then, it's so spot on you can consider it a documentary.

John Layton
8-Apr-2016, 05:30
I guided canoe trips and conducted photo workshops out of Gunflint (lake) Lodge back in the mid '70's. About 45 miles north west of Grand Marais (nw. shore of Lake Superior) up the Gunflint Trail...the lake straddles the Canadian border, and is located along a very historic french trading route. Stunning scenery and a relatively intact wilderness. At any rate - if you find yourself in Grand Marais and have a couple of days to burn, I'd recommend that you head up to Gunflint Lake and stay at the lodge. Take a canoe out in the early morning...as tendrils of mist rise off the lake - and I'll guarantee that you'll be inspired!

Wayne
8-Apr-2016, 06:41
If you go to Grand Portage you could also lug your 80lb pack of large format gear up and down the 9 mile hill of the great portage itself, documenting your misery and being thankful you aren't carrying the 200 lb packs of the voyageurs. This would be true "eccentric nature". Late May would be a good time, right after the blackflies emerge.

John Layton
8-Apr-2016, 11:27
I often carried 200 lbs. (a Duluth pack with a tumpline and a canoe) per carry on some of the portages when I guided in the Boundary Waters. Time was money, but the end result of this was a very painful case of separated achilles tendons - took months to heal properly.

johnmsanderson
26-Apr-2016, 14:11
Thanks for the suggestions everyone! It was a great trip, but I need to go back!

Two23
26-Apr-2016, 20:25
Good to see you again, John. Upon returning home I opened my box of Ilford HP5 and loaded holders for my 1920s Gundlach Korona 5x7 and lenses vintage 1905-1925. Last week I started taking some RR inspired landscapes I'm thinking of as my "Prairie Bits" series. I've started by taking shots of just a small part of a large scene. The prairie here looks monotonous, but it's actually made up of tiny bits. This forces you to slow down, look more closely, and carefully think of what you DON'T want in the photo. I think of it as distilling down a rambling view into it's most concentrated essence. I've lived on the Northern Plains all my life, and in South Dakota for the past quarter century. I've roamed all the counties and most of the roads, but still every week I find something I've not seen before. If you do make it back out, give me a holler.

My wife and I spent a week in downtown Chicago. I mostly took photos of the subways and Loop trains--something very exotic for me. I used a c.1983 Nikon F3/T with AiS lenses and Ilford HP5. Chicago in the rain really works when shot in b&w film, I think. My Flickr page with some of the photos:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/96826069@N00/


Kent in SD

johnmsanderson
27-Apr-2016, 07:41
Good to see you again, John. Upon returning home I opened my box of Ilford HP5 and loaded holders for my 1920s Gundlach Korona 5x7 and lenses vintage 1905-1925. Last week I started taking some RR inspired landscapes I'm thinking of as my "Prairie Bits" series. I've started by taking shots of just a small part of a large scene. The prairie here looks monotonous, but it's actually made up of tiny bits. This forces you to slow down, look more closely, and carefully think of what you DON'T want in the photo. I think of it as distilling down a rambling view into it's most concentrated essence. I've lived on the Northern Plains all my life, and in South Dakota for the past quarter century. I've roamed all the counties and most of the roads, but still every week I find something I've not seen before. If you do make it back out, give me a holler.

My wife and I spent a week in downtown Chicago. I mostly took photos of the subways and Loop trains--something very exotic for me. I used a c.1983 Nikon F3/T with AiS lenses and Ilford HP5. Chicago in the rain really works when shot in b&w film, I think. My Flickr page with some of the photos:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/96826069@N00/


Kent in SD

Great to see you too at the Center for Railroad Photography & Art ... it's a great yearly tradition! Your work looks great.

Definitely want to visit soon.