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View Full Version : Great Potential for Gear Hauler



Rick A
29-Mar-2016, 07:59
https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/enijeo/honey-badger-wheel-is-the-all-terrain-mechanical-a?token=88e53462

Could be the coolest, easiest way to pack all your LF gear to hard to reach sites.

lecarp
29-Mar-2016, 08:17
This might be fine for moving a carcus about. I personally would not put a child or valuable cameras on it.
A loss of footing or loosing your grip on the handle could be catastrophic.

DrTang
29-Mar-2016, 08:18
if it had two fold down legs so it could stand upright...

otherwise you'll have to lay it down...on top of your camera gear...when you stop

Kirk Gittings
29-Mar-2016, 08:38
This might be fine for moving a carcus about. I personally would not put a child or valuable cameras on it.
A loss of footing or loosing your grip on the handle could be catastrophic.

ditto

Colleen K
29-Mar-2016, 08:38
A Beach Rolly is cheaper http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005O9NUR2/?tag=howelltoy-20

Rael
29-Mar-2016, 08:46
This might be fine for moving a carcus about. I personally would not put a child or valuable cameras on it.
A loss of footing or loosing your grip on the handle could be catastrophic.


It looks like there is an optional front safety bar that would prevent things from going horribly wrong if you let go and the balance point is forward instead of back. Not sure going down stairs with a kid on it, safety bar or no, is a good thing, however.

Jac@stafford.net
29-Mar-2016, 09:04
This might be fine for moving a carcus about. I personally would not put a child or valuable cameras on it.
A loss of footing or loosing your grip on the handle could be catastrophic.

Yes. The children sit higher than if they were on a bicycle. I wonder if the manufacture, a bike maker, promotes helmets in their regular business.
.

Drew Bedo
1-Apr-2016, 09:06
Two fold down legs sounds like a good idea.

Maybe a hunting bi-pod?

The one wheel is problematic for me. I'd orefer something like aDIY- golf-bag cart or something store-bought like this:
http://www.feisol.com/0823photocart.html

SergeiR
1-Apr-2016, 12:39
Don't like it, sorry. Single wheel is too wobbly and top-heavy for lugging any gear with any kind of "worry free" attitude. Same goes to lugging kids with it.

Alan Gales
2-Apr-2016, 16:28
This is what I use with my 8x10 Wehman camera. I like it.

http://www.amazon.com/Klein-Tools-55452RTB-Tradesman-Organizer/dp/B00BZXA35I

scheinfluger_77
2-Apr-2016, 19:33
I think the guy has the right idea. The big diameter wheel will go a long way in handling terrain better than any other carts we've seen. It just needs two, or the dual legs like a wheel barrow.

Fred L
3-Apr-2016, 09:18
Problem I see for one wheelers is that you'll be spending energy trying to maintain balance with a top heavy load. Better to design two wheels, on articulating legs that follow terrain. Maybe if it was designed with hard case panniers that lower the CoG that might work.

I foresee Ritter getting lots of repair work if people use this to haul LF gear on uneven ground ;)

David Lobato
3-Apr-2016, 11:31
The Honey Badger is basically a wheel barrow. Nuff said.

Two23
3-Apr-2016, 21:36
In winter, I strap all my lighting gear into a long plastic tobbagan and pull it through the snow. The big wheel thing looks heavy and unwieldy. I can't imagine pushing something like that through much snow.


Kent in SD

Drew Bedo
4-Apr-2016, 05:09
Hmmmm . . . . . . . . .

What about training wheels? The comment may sound flippant or trivial, but the idea might actually work.

DennisD
4-Apr-2016, 06:14
...something store-bought like this:
http://www.feisol.com/0823photocart.html



This is what I use with my 8x10 Wehman camera. I like it.

http://www.amazon.com/Klein-Tools-55452RTB-Tradesman-Organizer/dp/B00BZXA35I

I can see using one of the above - very practical.

For camera equipment, the Kickstarter item could be a recipe for disaster unless seriously modified

HMG
4-Apr-2016, 06:16
Hmmmm . . . . . . . . .

What about training wheels? The comment may sound flippant or trivial, but the idea might actually work.

That's called a cart. :)

Frankly, the only advantage I see with this device is the low weight. Packing it on your back as one of the photos shows. But (I'm not a hunter) I don't know how useful that really is.

John Layton
4-Apr-2016, 22:58
My thought is that for anything but relatively smooth/even/well-packed/paved terrain, smallish diameter wheels just won't cut it.

For rougher terrain...like dirt paths/roads (especially when icy or muddy), gravel paths, beach or dune sand, etc. - such small wheels will bog down. Better would be something like the kind of garden carts which feature bicycle-sized wheels.

Better still (and much lighter weight) would be to fabricate something using actual bicycle wheels with an axle, running under a light weight frame, with a couple of aluminum poles projecting forward - allowing it to be either pushed or pulled like a rickshaw. My further thought is to design this device so that a photo backpack could be attached to it, in a way which would allow the pack to be quickly unclipped when encountering something "un-rollable" like a stream bed or the the like.

At any rate...I've got most of the parts for the above lying around - and will report back when and if I can get them together!

Drew Bedo
8-Apr-2016, 05:52
John: I like your thought process on this. Good stuff there.

First take a look at jogging strollers and bicycle trailers for design inspiration. You might even decide to salvage one or the other for reconstruction.


Alternatively: Re-imagine your concept into something that clamps to two legs of an extended tripod, The third leg would be opned up ~ parallel with the ground as the handle. For short distances the camera xan stay on top. When set-up, the legs raise the wheels slightly off the ground for stability. Gear would be supported on a shelf on the axel between the wheels.

Using the tripod as the basic frame for the rig saves weight and should break down for travel.

I do no foot travel anywhere more rugged than say, a golf course (Parks and paths etc). My rig for gear wheels is a work in progress centered on a golfbag cart.

Andrew O'Neill
8-Apr-2016, 16:33
I think a single wheel would be most efficient if pulled behind you...but even then, I would prefer two wheels, side-by-side, for stability. Luckily, most of my photography has been roadside, or very near one, so I've not needed an expensive cart. I do have a collapsible wagon that I have used on occasion but would never use it on rough terrain. That's when my pack comes in handy.:)

angusparker
8-Apr-2016, 19:22
This might be fine for moving a carcus about. I personally would not put a child or valuable cameras on it.
A loss of footing or loosing your grip on the handle could be catastrophic.

The videos of three kids on the single wheel terrify me as a parent! Ditto as a ULF owner!

Drew Bedo
9-Apr-2016, 04:13
Maybe if two of those were connected to make a two wheel-barrow? A good bicycle shop could do it. Shouldn't be too hard to DIY the Joining either. 'Course the cost would be at least double.

Fred L
9-Apr-2016, 06:33
Two wheels would be much better than this. Stability, ease of use with less strain (imo) etc..

I have this for yard work but plan to make something similar with two 24" bicycle wheels and expect it to look fugly when I'm done ;). The Lee Valley cart collapses which is great for saving space.

http://www.leevalley.com/en/garden/page.aspx?p=69559&cat=2,44639,33270

uphereinmytree
28-Apr-2016, 18:36
Based on the cost of bicycles, It seems overpriced. I also think those kids in the pics and vids should be walking instead of joyriding except maybe the really small ones. Also, I'm not really sure I could push a 200 lb dear carcass very far on this anywhere besides a sidewalk.

Randy Moe
28-Apr-2016, 19:39
Two wheels would be much better than this. Stability, ease of use with less strain (imo) etc..

I have this for yard work but plan to make something similar with two 24" bicycle wheels and expect it to look fugly when I'm done ;). The Lee Valley cart collapses which is great for saving space.

http://www.leevalley.com/en/garden/page.aspx?p=69559&cat=2,44639,33270

Lee Valley makes or sells great stuff.

That 33lb cart can carry 330 lbs and is USA made. Impressive.

I am using https://www.radicaldesign.com/bicycle-trailers/cyclone-bicycle-trailers/cyclone-iv-cargo.html but it is far lighter construction. Made who knows where, but EU designed and I bought mine during a winter sale 2 years ago. About 1/2 price.

I hauled 90 lbs of LF paper and film a few miles, which was far enough for me. Mostly I use it for light shopping and short LF city exploration. Best with no more than 50 lbs for this old man. It stores flat anywhere and the wheels are high grade QR.

Drew Bedo
29-Apr-2016, 04:42
Looks good Randy. The big wheels and platform make it really functional.

So you use it with a bicycle then? What about walking—ccan youu pull it along a pedestrian pathway?

Will it fold up for transport and storage?

Randy Moe
29-Apr-2016, 05:18
I primarily use with a big cheap plastic box zip tied to the frame. I don't use the fabric platform. It has quick release wheels that have 2 positions. One at rear for walking it like hand cart and the other centered for bike towing. Hitch is very fast to connect. I bungee heavy tripods to the top of the box. Great for around town. I put a flag and flashing taillight on it also. Tows smoothly.


Looks good Randy. The big wheels and platform make it really functional.

So you use it with a bicycle then? What about walking—ccan youu pull it along a pedestrian pathway?

Will it fold up for transport and storage?

Randy Moe
29-Apr-2016, 08:56
Hanging around the Darkroom waiting for better weather. Yes I am a fair weather shooter. That is not the tow bicycle. It's my high efficiency collectable, last of the USA Schwinns. Fair weather only.

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