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neil poulsen
27-Mar-2016, 17:02
I'd like to suggest that we begin a thread of color or black and white photographs that you've taken of historic buildings. When posting, please provide some information about the building whose image you're sharing. They should be scans of large format photographs as defined in this site. I you recall, let us know when the photograph was taken.

Photos could also be of architectural details of historic buildings.

Here are some guidelines for historic buildings included.

> Buildings should have been built prior to 1950.

> The buildings should be representative of their original architecture. For example, please don't include buildings that have obvious additions, or at least where the addition can be seen in the photo. With that said, if an addition is historic (say, prior to 1950?), then a building with an addition can be included.

> Don't include buildings that have vinyl windows, nor vinyl or aluminum siding.

> The buildings do not need to be listed on a national register to be included, nor do they need to be a structure within a recognized historic district.

The idea is, we want to get an idea of what a historic building looked like in its day.

The photograph I've included is of a home in Jacksonville, Oregon (USA), which I believe was built in the mid-19th century. Unfortunately, I don't know much more about the building.

The photograph is from a 4x5 color negative that was exposed in the 1990's. I'm not sure exactly why the red was showing through the paint in this fashion. I recall that it had a similar appearance in the 1960's. For me, the color added to the historic appeal of the structure.

Andrew O'Neill
27-Mar-2016, 21:04
Only US buildings?

neil poulsen
27-Mar-2016, 22:57
Only US buildings?

Good question. I think anywhere. Thanks for asking.

HMG
29-Mar-2016, 06:14
Great idea. I would encourage the poster to include a bit of history of the building (when built, usage if not obvious).

Of course, "historic" is relative. Minneapolis was built in the late 1800s, so it doesn't take much. East Coast US would have a different view. And even more so in Europe.

barnacle
29-Mar-2016, 06:55
Indeed - my last few posted photos have been of buildings over a thousand years old...

Neil

Randy Moe
29-Mar-2016, 07:06
Do you know the large Minneapolis office building that was constructed of huge wood uprights. The trees were nearly the size of California Redwoods. The building was downtown and the wood verticals were at least 8 stories tall.

I saw the building a long time ago, my memory fails on name and exact location. I would love to see images of that building and revisit it one day.

Few know or remember the upper Midwest once had massive trees however every single giant tree was cut down. :(



Great idea. I would encourage the poster to include a bit of history of the building (when built, usage if not obvious).

Of course, "historic" is relative. Minneapolis was built in the late 1800s, so it doesn't take much. East Coast US would have a different view. And even more so in Europe.

Dan O'Farrell
29-Mar-2016, 09:24
"...
> Buildings should have been built prior to 1950...."

Good Lord, I've become an historical artifact !!:rolleyes:

Ken Lee
29-Mar-2016, 09:42
Does this thread already cover the topic ? http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/showthread.php?71352-Old-Things-Farms-Barns-Buildings-Plus

Michael E
29-Mar-2016, 11:00
Does this thread already cover the topic ? http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/showthread.php?71352-Old-Things-Farms-Barns-Buildings-Plus

I don't think it does. If I understand Neil correctly, this thread is more about factual documentary than nostalgia.

A friend of mine used to work as a stonemason and often had to recontruct parts/ornaments of historic buildings. He was given old photographs to work with and was surprised about the amount of detail the old plates held.

If I can make a suggestion, let us not exclude modern artefacts like plastic windows, additions, renovations, or decay. They tell a lot about the culture of handling a historic building. The other day, I passed by a (minor) renaissance castle dating back to 1523, where they recently replaced to windows with plastic. Same story with most of the frame buildings the Bechers photographed. It hurts the eye. I would love to photograph just that. Capturing a historic building today looking like when it was built is an illusion, anyway.

Best,

Michael

Randy Moe
29-Mar-2016, 11:13
I think that's a good point.

I live in a modified 110 year old factory and many age old modificationa are present and of course we modified the mods.

I have found old pictures online of the escalator factory that was once inside my space.

Schwinn factory was down the street...

Chicago burns and rebuilds, a constantly evolving city.

Michael Graves
29-Mar-2016, 11:44
"...
> Buildings should have been built prior to 1950...."

Good Lord, I've become an historical artifact !!:rolleyes:

Only if you're built like a brick sh.....

Never mind.

Corran
29-Mar-2016, 14:22
I like this thread idea. More photos!

Here's one, this is The Crescent in Lowndes County, built in 1898. I don't remember any details (shot this 4 years ago) except it was taken with my Nikkor 90mm f/8, likely on T-Max 100:

http://www.oceanstarproductions.com/photosharing/197.jpg

HMG
29-Mar-2016, 19:03
Do you know the large Minneapolis office building that was constructed of huge wood uprights. The trees were nearly the size of California Redwoods. The building was downtown and the wood verticals were at least 8 stories tall.

I saw the building a long time ago, my memory fails on name and exact location. I would love to see images of that building and revisit it one day.

Few know or remember the upper Midwest once had massive trees however every single giant tree was cut down. :(

It might be Butler Square (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Butler_Square). I'm in what was a warehouse district - older buildings here with wood beams up to 2 feet square. But in the downtown office area, many historic buildings were demolished in the name of progress (http://lileks.com/mpls/gateway/). Tall buildings here started using steel frames around 1900, so I suspect an 8 story wood beam building would have been built earlier. You'd probably find it here (http://lileks.com/mpls/gone.html).

Logging of pine along the Mississippi and St. Croix rivers in the mid-1800s drove much of the settlement of this area. Much of that logging was out-and-out illegal as it was on land owned by Ojibwe and Dakota. The logging that was not out-and-out illegal relied on treaties that were, most of the time, deceptive and/or reneged upon. Not our finest moment.

And now, back to our regularly scheduled thread:

This building started life in the 1880s as a hotel. In 1915, it became the Commutator Brass Foundry (rear section and smokestack not in photograph) and that name - Commutator Foundry building - continues on. I don't know when it stopped being used as a foundry, but in the post-WWI period was used as offices. Currently a home good "boutique" is on the main level. Nice stuff but expensive.

This shot taken with my Travelwide.
149027

Randy Moe
29-Mar-2016, 20:14
It must have been Butler Square. This is an edit. I read everything else first.


I looked at the sad old destroyed buildings and read the droll commentary, but my building was not here.

The building I am thinking of was still there in the 80's at least and I think an upscale fashion hub. Exposed wood beam. You could touch it. You could look straight up at a high center courtyard. I have searched many times, never find it and my source, my father has passed.

Perhaps some emails to relatives still there will find it.

Thanks for the history. I love old buildings, the odder the better.

blueribbontea
29-Mar-2016, 20:57
The Spokane Public Bath, 1912. changing house for the first public swimming pools in Spokane. Too many kids were dying in the river in the hot summers and behind the camera two pools were built outdoors. The original pools are long gone. I shot this in the early 90's with an Eastman 2d 8X10 with a Protar VII in a B&L compound shutter. Still a sweet lens and shutter today. Presently the building is on the Historic Register, but filled with lawn bowling supplies behind the modern Witter Pool.

blueribbontea
29-Mar-2016, 21:15
149031 The Central School building has a bronze emblem attached to the front saying it is on the National Historic register as a 19th century school for what was once a thriving farming community served by more than one railroad line, all of which have disappeared or hidden by overgrowth. We found this accidentally just exploring and I did a Walker Evans thing as seemed appropriate at the time with a 4X5 and a 210 Symmar.

dasBlute
30-Mar-2016, 09:32
I really like the detail and history behind the "Spokane Public Bath", and appreciate the Walker Evans approach to the school building as well...

Here's one the the Rockefeller-built "Gatehouses" in Acadia National Park, whose stone and wood exteriors
evoke medieval French architecture...

this is with a 110mm lens on a 4x5

149045

neil poulsen
30-Mar-2016, 10:44
Does this thread already cover the topic ? http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/showthread.php?71352-Old-Things-Farms-Barns-Buildings-Plus

It's a good thread, broad, and well populated.

But, I think that historic architecture can be very cool. I thought it worthwhile to begin a thread just for this subcategory.

djdister
30-Mar-2016, 11:19
It's a good thread, broad, and well populated.

But, I think that historic architecture can be very cool. I thought it worthwhile to begin a thread just for this subcategory.

I agree, and I think the [excellent] images posted to this thread already demonstrate the need for this specific sub-category. Thanks!

bgh
4-Apr-2016, 06:58
Nice idea for a thread! I'm a historian by trade, not a photographer, so this is a treat to see.

Lately I've been donating my time on behalf of the Preservation League of NY State to do some photographs of the most threatened historic sites around the state, which they've identified as their Seven to Save (http://www.preservenys.org/seven-to-save---2016-17.html). I've done a few of the sites so far, including this building, the Dutch Reformed Church in Newburgh, a small city in the Hudson River Valley. It is a Greek Revival masterpiece designed by A.J. Davis and completed in 1835, and is now in rough shape. It remains water-tight, though, and has had some restoration work done to stabilize the structure. The hope is that it can find a new use, and remain in place.

It is now surrounded by modern buildings, with parking very nearly up to the portico. I did this view in the early evening, after the employees of the school district had left work and opened up just enough space in front of the building for a clean view of the portico.

4x5, Shen Hao, 150mm Fujinon, TMY.

Bruce
149208

HMG
4-Apr-2016, 07:20
...Lately I've been donating my time on behalf of the Preservation League of NY State to do some photographs of the most threatened historic sites around the state, which they've identified as their Seven to Save ([url]http://www.preservenys.org/seven-to-save---...

Good for you. I wonder if there's a need in other localities to document historic buildings. Especially ones that are lower profile and they can't justify payment. Seems like a natural fit for a bunch of LF photographers.

bgh
4-Apr-2016, 07:35
Good for you. I wonder if there's a need in other localities to document historic buildings. Especially ones that are lower profile and they can't justify payment. Seems like a natural fit for a bunch of LF photographers.

That's a nice thought. I do a fair number of HABS/HAER jobs for hire, but locally I'm more likely to volunteer my time and donate the negatives to our active local historical association. There are quite a lot of locally important historic buildings that slip through the regulatory cracks, and go away without little notice. I hate to think that there will be no memory of these buildings and sites, and so our local organization knows to contact me if they hear of anything, as they have no funds for such work and no way to force anyone to hire me. However, they often can provide me with access to some pretty interesting places, which is a reward of its own. I think that it would be wonderful for other LF photographers to have similar relationships. Getting even one or two exterior images into a public archive will help to preserve these memories for future generations.

Corran
4-Apr-2016, 08:01
That reminds me. I reallllly need to get my butt down to the local Carnegie Library and talk to them about HABS/HAER stuff. I am not sure if things just aren't online, but there isn't even a listing for my county in the LOC database. A ton of smaller counties nearby have photos. I'm curious if somewhere along the way a folder was lost. There's a lot of historic buildings that I would love to document.

Winger
6-Apr-2016, 06:49
Lately I've been donating my time on behalf of the Preservation League of NY State to do some photographs of the most threatened historic sites around the state, which they've identified as their Seven to Save (http://www.preservenys.org/seven-to-save---2016-17.html).


I don't know its current state, but Herkimer Home just East of Little Falls, NY was the home of the Revolutionary War General Herkimer and had been open for tours and special historical events. I remember hearing it was closing to the public a few years ago, but I don't know if it's been reopened or not. It would be a good project all by itself. I grew up in Little Falls, but live 8 hours away now.

dasBlute
6-Apr-2016, 09:12
Nice idea for a thread! I'm a historian by trade, not a photographer, so this is a treat to see.
.... Bruce
149208

I beg to differ :)

nice work, Bruce, on your site as well.

archphotofisher
6-Apr-2016, 17:20
Sinar c, 4x5 fujichrome, 120mm fuji



149286

Gregg Obst
7-Apr-2016, 03:56
Historic buildings are sort of my specialty.

The Henry House on the grounds of the Manassas battlefield in Manassas, Virginia. The present house was built in 1870 to replace the original one on the hill. That original house saw fighting in the immediate vicinity during the first Civil War battle of Bull Run on July 21, 1861. During that battle the Henry Family matriarch, Judith Henry was killed, the only civilian casualty of the battles at Manassas. In 1940 the Henry House was donated to the National Park Service to become part of Manassas Battlefield Park.

From my ongoing "Farmscapes of the Civil War" project. Shot on a foggy, rainy day in January of 2016.

Technical details:
Toko wood 4x5.
150mm F6.3 Rodenstock Geronar lens in Copal BT shutter.
Arista EDU Ultra 400 (re-branded Fomapan) @ 400.
1/8th second at F32.
Pyrocat HD at 1:1:100 dilution for 11 minutes @ 20 degrees Celsius in Jobo Multitank 5 with 2509N sheet film reels with drum placed on Unicolor Uniroller 352 auto-reversing rotary base.
Negative scanned with Epson 4990 on holders with ANR glass.

149291

bgh
7-Apr-2016, 06:11
You're very kind to say so, Tim, thanks. Terrific stuff on your site as well! I've been enjoying it.

Bruce


I beg to differ :)

nice work, Bruce, on your site as well.

AtlantaTerry
7-Apr-2016, 21:41
... I do a fair number of HABS/HAER jobs for hire ...


May I ask a few questions about this?

What does that kind of work entail?
Who hires the photography?
What is the typical pay?
Etc.

Thanks,
Terry

AtlantaTerry
7-Apr-2016, 21:43
Do you know the large Minneapolis office building that was constructed of huge wood uprights. The trees were nearly the size of California Redwoods. The building was downtown and the wood verticals were at least 8 stories tall.

I saw the building a long time ago, my memory fails on name and exact location. I would love to see images of that building and revisit it one day.

Few know or remember the upper Midwest once had massive trees however every single giant tree was cut down. :(

If my memory is right, you may be thinking about the Johnson & Johnson corporate headquarters building. Or 3M?

Might Frank Lloyd Wright have been the architect?

Randy Moe
7-Apr-2016, 21:58
If my memory is right, you may be thinking about the Johnson & Johnson corporate headquarters building. Or 3M?

Might Frank Lloyd Wright have been the architect?

HMG LFPF member from MPLS got it right with http://www.butlersquare.com/

Very impressive building, especially if you examine the huge spars!

Further discussion revealed I knew the guy who renovated it.

Pete Oakley
8-Apr-2016, 02:54
149311
One of the buildings at Middleton Hall, North Warwickshire. The oldest building on this site dates back to 1285.
Pete.

Scott Schroeder
8-Apr-2016, 12:39
This is a dovecote found at mayfield park. Here's the back story:

"The cottage—built sometime between 1860 and 1880 on plantation land belonging to Judge Robert J. Townes—passed through many hands until 1909, when Allison Mayfield (1860-1923), former Texas Secretary of State and then-Chairman of the Texas Railroad Commission, purchased it and the proximate acreage for a weekend home. He left it, upon his death, to his daughter Mary Mayfield Gutsch. Over the next half-century, Mary and her husband, Milton, a University of Texas history professor, transformed their homestead into a showpiece graced with pools and peafowl and the Texas plant life Mary nurtured with the help of a trusted gardener."........."Next to it stands a circular rubble-stone dovecote in which Professor Gutsch once raised fancy white Moorhead pigeons."


http://schroederworks.com/files/gimgs/54_Mayfield_Dovecote.jpg

Emmanuel BIGLER
12-Apr-2016, 03:30
One of the buildings at Middleton Hall, North Warwickshire

Nice old building, Pete!

What is the proper technical term in English to denote this kind of building made of wood frames and brick combined, like in Germany; or like in Alsace or near Troyes (in France)?
I have in mind the expression "half-timbered house" but I'm not sure if this is UK-English or another dialect ;)

Steven Tribe
12-Apr-2016, 06:06
I think it is technically a timbered house. Half-timbered is reserved for buildings which have lower parts in stone, rubble, flint or, occasionally, brick. Around the Elizabethan era the filling up with often fancy brickwork became quite popular amongst the wealthy and there were revivals around the Arts and Crafts time too.

For builders, the advantage of a timber framed house is that it can be put together ove a few days on site - rather like the IKEA concept and the roof can finished quickly. Most timber framed houses where I live have had the original fillings between the oak timbers, which was a hassel lattice with clay, sand and horse manure mixed together. As most timber frames get a little decrepit after many hundreds of years, the fillling has been replaced by brickwork to stabilise the building.

I think this later is the case with this building at Middleton Hall.

Emmanuel BIGLER
13-Apr-2016, 09:32
I think it is technically a timbered house. Half-timbered is reserved for buildings which have lower parts in stone, rubble, flint or, occasionally, brick....

Thank you, Steven, for the explanations.
So "timbered" is the proper term.

neil poulsen
13-Apr-2016, 14:18
Some really nice images are being shared; exactly what I was hoping for. Thanks!

Pete Oakley
14-Apr-2016, 00:22
If you call this type of building half timbered everybody here will know what you mean. Most of them (as far as I know) started life with daub and wattle between the timbers but in many cases this was removed and replaced with bricks.
Pete.

archphotofisher
14-Apr-2016, 17:50
Livingston,Montana BN train station,4x5 sinar f, 120mm fuji, 149642

bgh
3-May-2016, 06:55
Here's a terrific historic house just around the corner from me, which I've long admired. Built in 1848 by Alfred Fyler, it is located in what then was the small community of Split Rock outside of Syracuse, now just a part of the outer suburbs in Onondaga Hill. In 1848, this would have been a bit of a retro styled house with the more obviously Greek Revival then still in fashion in our neighborhood.

Fyler was a terse, tight-fisted widower when he built this house for his young and vivacious wife, Ruth. Alas, Ruth was viciously murdered in the house in 1854. Her husband was convicted of the murder, but rather than sentencing him death the judge remanded him to the Utica State Asylum for the Insane, from which he was released after a year, deemed cured. He returned home, but spiraled downward into paranoia and committed suicide as he attempted to flee his imagined pursuers. As a later article about he case noted, "He lived dishonored and died unmourned." The rumors of the house being haunted have, of course, continued to the present.

This is one of my early views with my new-to-me Korona 8x10, using a 360 Graphic Kowa on Ilford FP4, scanned on an Epson 750, on a day with lovely morning sunlight which belied the gruesome story.

Bruce

150383

alanbutler57
4-May-2016, 17:30
Not sure if I posted these already:

Baker Hotel Mineral Wells TX
Speed Graphic 127 Ektar HP5 I think and Microphen

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/431/20417017105_ffd3a61d38_b.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/x7bxSi)Baker Hotel Mineral Wells (https://flic.kr/p/x7bxSi) by Alan Butler (https://www.flickr.com/photos/43210263@N04/), on Flickr

Old Fort Worth Train Station (now appartments) Very, very tight crop from a far away shot with the Speed Graphic

https://farm1.staticflickr.com/557/20439626575_1225b684e4_b.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/x9bqSK)Fort Worth Station Texas & Pacific Railroad (https://flic.kr/p/x9bqSK) by Alan Butler (https://www.flickr.com/photos/43210263@N04/), on Flickr

archphotofisher
5-May-2016, 18:04
150492

Rainer Brewery Seattle,Wa

Sazerac
5-May-2016, 19:56
Some great images in here! I need to dig out a shot of the hotel in Mineral Wells. Beautiful building. I wish that someone could make a go at restoring it.

neil poulsen
5-May-2016, 21:03
150492

Rainer Brewery Seattle,Wa

What a neat building. In fact, I'm headed for Seattle tomorrow to pick up some equipment. If I can, I'll stop by.

alanbutler57
6-May-2016, 05:43
Some great images in here! I need to dig out a shot of the hotel in Mineral Wells. Beautiful building. I wish that someone could make a go at restoring it.

Hard to imagine the massive investment it would take to put this place back in order. The sidewalk had several tiny dead bats laying around, I'm sure the hotel houses a sizable colony! It would make a great movie set though.

Scott --
9-May-2016, 14:09
This is an oldie, and I really need to go back again. The former Birdboro Corporation mill, Birdsboro, PA.

https://farm8.staticflickr.com/7699/26826338152_a39d0aa70c_c.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/GSxZHA)Birdsboro Corporation (https://flic.kr/p/GSxZHA) by Scott (https://www.flickr.com/photos/scott--/), on Flickr

The company that became Birdsboro Corp. started in the 1700s as an iron forge and went through multiple iterations before the mill was shuttered in the 80s. The building is still there, and has been parted out to multiple small businesses, but is largely vacant. The water tower was felled years ago now.

Read all about it here (http://www2.readingeagle.com/article.aspx?id=54132).

5x7 Arista, 121/8 Super Angulon (I think)

neil poulsen
9-May-2016, 20:17
Hard to imagine the massive investment it would take to put this place back in order. The sidewalk had several tiny dead bats laying around, I'm sure the hotel houses a sizable colony! It would make a great movie set though.

I didn't realize that the upper end of this building borders I5. I've driven by this building many times, but didn't realize the view that it offers from below.

Winger
17-May-2016, 12:22
This is a house in Little Falls, NY that was built in 1832. Until 2013ish, it was still in the same family. Unfortunately, none of the descendants are in that area and in need of a house that size. Yes, ok, it's my family - my grandmother was the last to live in the house and she passed away in 2010 at age 97. It was sold a few years after her death. A few changes have been made since it was built, but all were made more than 50 years ago. I'm also attaching an old photo of it (from maybe the early 1900s?). As far as I know, it's always been brick that was painted yellow.

150996
150997

scheinfluger_77
17-May-2016, 16:22
Very nice looking home. That kind of elegant living is long gone. Plenty of room for a darkroom?

Winger
17-May-2016, 18:13
Very nice looking home. That kind of elegant living is long gone. Plenty of room for a darkroom?

The basement is more rustic than you'd expect (though probably nice by 1832 standards) and has a dirt floor. There also isn't "real" plumbing in most of it as far as I remember. But with a little creativity, I'm sure it could be rigged. The ceiling isn't very tall. BUT, with the number of rooms in the house, I'd bet one could be done upstairs somewhere. My great-grandmother was a watercolorist and made a room on the third floor into a studio - north light, pretty cool. Yeah, I wish I'd been in a position to move back up there to take over the house.

bgh
19-May-2016, 04:53
Another from my volunteer documentation project for the Preservation League of NYS, here is perhaps the most remarkable building that I've had the chance to photograph, the Gould Memorial Library, flanked on either side by the Hall of Languages and and the Hall of Philosophy. Designed by Stanford White (part of the firm of McKim, Mead & White in NYC) and completed in 1899, it was originally part of NYU's uptown campus in the Bronx, now a part of the Bronx Community College. White based the Library, with its shallow rotunda, on the Pantheon, and it is one of the great Beaux-Arts masterpieces in New York City. It now has some significant structural issues due to water penetration, and the Preservation League is working with the Bronx Community College (now a part of the City University of New York system) to provide technical assistance and raise the money needed to restore the landmark.

4x5 Shen Hao, 150mm Fujinon, TMAX 400, orange filter

Bruce

John Kasaian
19-May-2016, 07:13
Another from my volunteer documentation project for the Preservation League of NYS, here is perhaps the most remarkable building that I've had the chance to photograph, the Gould Memorial Library, flanked on either side by the Hall of Languages and and the Hall of Philosophy. Designed by Stanford White (part of the firm of McKim, Mead & White in NYC) and completed in 1899, it was originally part of NYU's uptown campus in the Bronx, now a part of the Bronx Community College. White based the Library, with its shallow rotunda, on the Pantheon, and it is one of the great Beaux-Arts masterpieces in New York City. It now has some significant structural issues due to water penetration, and the Preservation League is working with the Bronx Community College (now a part of the City University of New York system) to provide technical assistance and raise the money needed to restore the landmark.

4x5 Shen Hao, 150mm Fujinon, TMAX 400, orange filter

Bruce

What a cool aerial photo, Bruce.
How did you do that with field camera---was it handheld?

bgh
19-May-2016, 07:23
What a cool aerial photo, Bruce.
How did you do that with field camera---was it handheld?
Thanks, John! Alas, no, nothing so acrobatic. The College's facilities manager let me go up to the roof of a nearby building, eight stories tall with tremendous views all around. The view of the Manhattan skyline from the other side of the roof was fantastic.

I might note that this view is looking to the northwest, with the Hudson River and the Palisades in the background. Mr. White certainly knew how to site his building!

Bruce

DennisD
19-Jun-2016, 15:09
The house is Buffalo Bill's childhood home (one of them) and was originally located in LeClaire, Iowa.
The Chicago, Burlington and Quincy Railroad purchased the house as a tourist attraction and moved it to Cody, Wyoming, Buffalo Bill's adopted hometown, in 1933.

There's more about this in Wikipedia:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buffalo_Bill_Boyhood_Home

Years ago I was in Cody, Wyoming and took this photograph from the back side of the house.
I especially liked the surrounding picket fence and the symmetry of the composition.
After I took the photo, the undeveloped film (4x5 Tri-x 4164) sat, by accident, in a box of negs that was not developed ...for about 25 years.

I developed the negatives a few years ago with fairly good results - surprising, considering the long wait !
Scanned the negative and post processed in PS with a fair amount of adjustment to get things looking reasonably OK.
The negative is somewhat grainy, a bit low in contrast with limited shadow detail.. However, entirely workable into a decent print - thanks to PS.

Camera: Linhof MT 4x5, Lens 90mm Super Angulon


http://jackandbeans.com/pbd/WY_Cody_BBhouse-fence_1000x748px.jpg

jnanian
19-Jun-2016, 19:05
Another from my volunteer documentation project for the Preservation League of NYS, here is perhaps the most remarkable building that I've had the chance to photograph, the Gould Memorial Library, flanked on either side by the Hall of Languages and and the Hall of Philosophy. Designed by Stanford White (part of the firm of McKim, Mead & White in NYC) and completed in 1899, it was originally part of NYU's uptown campus in the Bronx, now a part of the Bronx Community College. White based the Library, with its shallow rotunda, on the Pantheon, and it is one of the great Beaux-Arts masterpieces in New York City. It now has some significant structural issues due to water penetration, and the Preservation League is working with the Bronx Community College (now a part of the City University of New York system) to provide technical assistance and raise the money needed to restore the landmark.

4x5 Shen Hao, 150mm Fujinon, TMAX 400, orange filter

Bruce

hey bruce
it is always a treat to see things designed by stanford white.
mckim mead and white designed an awful lot of things, they were the cream of the crop !
they designed the RI state capital for example is the 2nd largest freestanding dome in the world
and oodles of bungalow/ craftsman style mansions in newport ri
taken over by local universities as dormatories ... sanford white was the person
who did the watercolor renderings in the firm, if you ever get a chance to see his renderings
DO IT, they are breathtaking.
he and mckim both worked for hh richardson before doing their own thing, and hh richardson was a rockstar ..

thanks for posting this !
john

Sazerac
4-Jul-2016, 09:05
The Forest Park Tower & Gate, Fort Worth Texas
152439
TMax 100 XTOL 1:1, Nikkor 75mm f4.5 lens

Sazerac
4-Jul-2016, 09:08
Baker Hotel, Mineral Wells Texas
152441
TMax 100 XTOL 1:1, Nikkor 90mm f4.5 lens

rdenney
11-Jul-2016, 21:13
Here's a few:

http://www.rickdenney.com/missions_in_4x5/missionconcepcin1993.jpg
Mission Concepción, San Antonio, Texas, 1993. These missions were built in the 1830's.

Here's another from the same series:

http://www.rickdenney.com/missions_in_4x5/missionconcepcinsouthtower1993.jpg

Both were on Ilford FP4.

And something much more recent, but I'm not so happy with it at the moment--it needs some cropping, I think:

http://www.rickdenney.com/Island/saltbox_lores.jpg
Saltbox House, near Nantucket, built in 1740. I made the photo in 2012, on Fuji 160c.

Rick "who has posted these before" Denney

neil poulsen
11-Jul-2016, 21:26
Very nice photographs. (Above.)

What advantage do you see in using FP4, say as opposed to HP5? I ask, because I'm using HP5 and getting good results. But, I'm also intrigued by FP4.

rdenney
12-Jul-2016, 08:54
Very nice photographs. (Above.)

What advantage do you see in using FP4, say as opposed to HP5? I ask, because I'm using HP5 and getting good results. But, I'm also intrigued by FP4.

Neil, I always preferred FP4--I never really communed with T-grain films (my fault without a doubt). HP5 is a bit grainier, being faster, and for me had a bit less range. FP4 was more forgiving for me.

But I was never really obsessive about film selection. I just picked a good general-purpose film and did my best to learn it.

These were developed in HC-110, dilution B, often at temps a bit higher than I would have liked--it was San Antonio and water came out of the tap at 73 or 74 degrees--using hangers and deep tanks. I still have those around here somewhere, I just don't have a darkroom.

Rick "who has always preferred field work to darkroom work" Denney

DrTang
12-Jul-2016, 09:53
Santa Barbara Courthouse

http://www.mericphoto.com/lfp/sbcourthouse.jpg

HoodedOne
13-Jul-2016, 00:41
Jekertoren (Maastricht - Netherlands)

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1658/26204406852_c20ce48cf9_b.jpg (https://www.flickr.com/photos/hoodedone-photos/26204406852/)P2016-033.jpg (https://www.flickr.com/photos/hoodedone-photos/26204406852/) by HoodedOne (https://www.flickr.com/photos/hoodedone-photos/), on Flickr

Part of the 13th century defensive wall around Maastricht

Camera: Wanderlust Travelwide 4x5
Film: Polaroid PolaColor 100 (expired)

Maris Rusis
19-Jul-2016, 23:05
https://c1.staticflickr.com/7/6218/6265088815_9c3cf82b02_b.jpg
Masonic Lodge, Barcaldine.
Gelatin-silver photograph on Agfa Classic MCC 111 VC FB paper, image area 19.6cm X 24.4cm, from a Tmax 400 negative exposed in a Tachihara 810HD triple extension field view camera fitted with a Fujinon-W 300mm f5.6 lens and #25 red filter. The lodge is an exemplar of the beauty of pragmatic corrugated iron construction.

Randy Moe
22-Jul-2016, 08:30
https://c7.staticflickr.com/9/8763/27856513734_824acb775e_b.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/JrzV2y)Barat cupula 7-20-2016 (https://flic.kr/p/JrzV2y) by moe.randy (https://www.flickr.com/photos/tincancollege/), on Flickr

All that is left of a lovely 100 year old school. Which is ancient in Chicago. The cupula casually placed on a vast field where once stood, Old Main, dorms and even a 1960's Flying Saucer shaped science building.

This is where I studied darkroom in 1997.

http://sofie.org/news/barat-college-gifted-woodlands-academy

A few believed ghosts haunted it. I shot the ghost in 1999 on 35mm and already shared that picture.

Here is a link to a Pano that shows the emptiness of the former grounds. https://c5.staticflickr.com/9/8697/28190036660_140ba7395a_b.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/JX4iLQ)IMG_2561 (https://flic.kr/p/JX4iLQ) by moe.randy (https://www.flickr.com/photos/tincancollege/), on Flickr

They kept the $5 million 1997 new library...

I am sure the emptiness will not last, as it is prime, yet Holy ground with many nuns buried in the back.

Robclarke
26-Jul-2016, 01:44
This is Boone's chapel in Lewisham, South East London. It is on the busy lee high road (A20). It was designed by Sir Christopher Wren and built in 1683. It was refurbished in 2008 and now is used as an Architect's studio.

Taken using Linhof Master Technika and Schdeider 80mm f4.5 xl. Exposure 4 seconds at F22 with yellow orange filter. Ilford Delta 100 developed for 6 minutes in Ilford Ilfotec HC.

I don't think I have really got the tones I was after from the scan but might try printing it when I next visit a darkroom (don't have my own facilities).

https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8766/28273299600_950a31a9bb_h.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/K5q3WL)img181 (https://flic.kr/p/K5q3WL) by biotecbob (https://www.flickr.com/photos/robertedwardclarke/), on Flickr

Robclarke
27-Jul-2016, 04:10
I have tried to unblock some of the shadows in this version.

https://c1.staticflickr.com/9/8766/28273299600_4949a5282f_h.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/K5q3WL)Boone's chapel, Lewisham (https://flic.kr/p/K5q3WL) by biotecbob (https://www.flickr.com/photos/robertedwardclarke/), on Flickr

Ps does anyone know what the development mark is in the mid right of the sky? Development was done with 800ml solution with a single 4x5 sheet in a Paterson tank.

schafphoto
14-Oct-2016, 21:10
Here’s a recent HABS photograph from a project in Beverly Hills. I kinda like the flat orthogonal view of the front facade that.
156180

neil poulsen
15-Oct-2016, 11:45
Here’s a recent HABS photograph from a project in Beverly Hills. I kinda like the flat orthogonal view of the front facade that.
156180

Out of curiosity, when was the building constructed?

schafphoto
16-Oct-2016, 16:16
The building above was constructed earlier but remodeled into the brutalist facade you see above in 1948. I tell people that Historic American Buildings Surveys (HABS) could also be called Significant Building Surveys since the resource doesn’t need to be old but rather it needs to be “significant.” The “50-year rule” is just a guideline and brings us currently up to 1966. The entire Space Shuttle project has been documented even though it’s less than 50 years old. I have photographed the 1983 Sea Shadow (IX-529) for HAER (Historic American Engineering Survey) and the Lovelace pool 1973 by Landscape Architect Isabelle Greene, FASLA for HALS (Historic American Landscapes Survey). And the buildings don’t necessarily need to be amazing or beautiful – the Top Hat Cafe is an example of a vernacular resource. The idea of these historic documentations is to document “The complete resume of the builder’s art.” I encourage anyone with the time and the desire to photograph significant architecture in the USA to donate your film and contact prints to the Library of Congress through the HABS/HAER/HALS programs. The paperwork is tedious and the archival specifications are exacting but it’s worth it if you don’t mind having your photos in the public domain for all to use. All three of these documentations were donations.

https://c3.staticflickr.com/6/5776/30255157362_83d9927fcd_o.jpg
Top Hat Burger Cafe, 1946, Ventura California. HABS-CA-2863

https://c4.staticflickr.com/9/8554/30285522211_e60e5c06c3_o.jpg
The Lovelace pool by Isabelle Greene, 1973, HALS CA-129

https://c2.staticflickr.com/6/5456/30285552561_6cb854f248_o.jpg
The Sea Shadow, 1983, (IX-529) HAER-CA

bgh
2-Apr-2017, 18:03
It is a bit frightening to think that a building that is younger than I am is now historic, but there you are. I've been meaning for a while now to take a photo of I.M. Pei's classic Brutalist building for the Newhouse School of Public Communication at Syracuse University, completed in 1964. A friend and I were poking around the campus today with the 8x10, and I noticed that the light was particularly lovely on it. I normally don't use the 8x10 for architecture, but the Korona Commercial's movements proved more or less up to the task.

163380
8x10, 300mm Fujinon-W, HP5+, scanned from negative on Epson V750.

Bruce

Daniel Unkefer
3-Apr-2017, 15:34
https://c1.staticflickr.com/2/1516/23966345393_3c62ed6623_b.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/CvPMvB)Makiflex Acros 150 SymmarS (https://flic.kr/p/CvPMvB) by Nokton48 (https://www.flickr.com/photos/18134483@N04/), on Flickr

Ohio State University, Library of Geology (Orton Hall)
Plaubel Makiflex, 150mm Symmar-S at f11, 30 second exposure, Microdol-X, 6x9cm Fuji Acros roll film

Daniel Unkefer
3-Apr-2017, 15:51
https://c1.staticflickr.com/6/5546/30691948881_694c12a7ef_b.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/NL9g7r)Scan-161104-0001 (https://flic.kr/p/NL9g7r) by Nokton48 (https://www.flickr.com/photos/18134483@N04/), on Flickr

Ye Olde Mill, Utica Ohio, (The Ice Cream Factory).
Plaubel Makina IIIR, F4.2 Plaubel Anticomar at F11. 6x9cm Ilford FP4+ rollfilm. Microdol-X
My wife and I enjoyed ice cream. Testing the Makina IIIR was a bonus. :)

bgh
8-Apr-2017, 08:36
I've never got around to trying Fuji Acros before, and when I saw a nearly-reasonable price at Adorama, I decided to try a box. A vacant church in Syracuse where I've been before, South Presbyterian (1906), seemed a good test case for the reputed absence of reciprocity correction out to 2 minutes, since there is no electricity in the church and the only light is through some stained-glass windows on three of the walls. And lo and behold, the meter near the pulpit called for 2 minutes at f32, which I shot with no correction. Good heavens, but that is remarkable. I'm still quite smitten by TMax 400, but this was a heck of a lot of fun to try.

Bruce
163620
4x5, Shen Hao. Fuji Acros 100. Fujinon 90mm. Flatbed scan on Epson V750.

Leigh
8-Apr-2017, 09:06
South Presbyterian (1906), seemed a good test case for the reputed absence of reciprocity correction out to 2 minutes
Hi Bruce,

Yep, it's true.

What I think is even more impressive is only 1/2 stop correction out to 1000 seconds.

Love your test shot. The mass of curves is quite neat.

- Leigh

bgh
8-Apr-2017, 09:36
Hi Bruce,

Yep, it's true.

What I think is even more impressive is only 1/2 stop correction out to 1000 seconds.

Love your test shot. The mass of curves is quite neat.

- Leigh

Thanks, Leigh. It is one of the most remarkable church interiors that I've seen; the balcony curves around the entire interior from one side of the pulpit to another, in the most wonderfully sinuous way. It is quite enchanting, and I've enjoyed doing some photographs of the place over the past couple of years. It is now in the hands of the Greater Syracuse Land Bank, which is trying to lay the basis for a new owner to take over the place and bring it back to at least a semblance of its former glory.

Bruce

schafphoto
8-Apr-2017, 17:19
Bruce, quite a fine photo. art and documentary at the same time (as is much of your work).

Are you going to donate this to the Historic American Buildings Survey? it seems this is a perfect HABS photo. I think 1906 qualifies as historic.

-Schaf

HiHoSilver
8-Apr-2017, 18:34
Thanks, Leigh. It is one of the most remarkable church interiors that I've seen; the balcony curves around the entire interior from one side of the pulpit to another, in the most wonderfully sinuous way. It is quite enchanting, and I've enjoyed doing some photographs of the place over the past couple of years. It is now in the hands of the Greater Syracuse Land Bank, which is trying to lay the basis for a new owner to take over the place and bring it back to at least a semblance of its former glory.

Bruce

Bruce, I like alot of existing light interior shots - also of churches/cathedrals. I've been busting tail to get the tonal separation from Acros & haven't been able to. 'Good constrast, all the wonderful absence of reciprocity, but can't get it to touch HP5/FP4 for tones. If you or anyone has a recipe (tried D76, PyroHD, HC-110, haven't tried Rodinol) that brings out the tonal joy, pls let me know. 'Nice shot. I spent a day in Portland First Pres (1894) doing the same. 'Breathtaking place. 14 species of *carved* wood in carpenter gothic. If someone near here like Stawastawa or Austin Grainer ever cut loose there, the result would be powerful.

bgh
9-Apr-2017, 07:34
Bruce, quite a fine photo. art and documentary at the same time (as is much of your work).

Are you going to donate this to the Historic American Buildings Survey? it seems this is a perfect HABS photo. I think 1906 qualifies as historic.

-Schaf

Stephen--

That's kind of you to say, thank you. I do like to have fun with this stuff! Truth be told, I hadn't thought about donating the negatives to HABS. A number of my Syracuse-area negatives have gone to the Onondaga Historical Association, but I haven't gotten around to doing anything with these South Presbyterian negatives. It is an excellent idea, though, and I'll get in touch with HABS folks to see about their interest.

Thanks again,
Bruce

Scott Schroeder
9-Apr-2017, 17:46
Seaholm power plant.

http://schroederworks.com/Pics/Stacks001-01.jpg

grjonathan
22-Apr-2017, 19:34
Hello, long time lurker here. Glad to be able to see your directly-uploaded images now.

Here's a Toronto apartment building c. 1915. Not many were built in this period owing to an apartment 'ban' in 1912.


https://c1.staticflickr.com/1/724/32064776854_3a96bf2145_b.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/QRsn3f)

Shot on HP5+ @ 100 through a 90 Super-Angulon f8 with red filter. Scanned with an Epson 10000XL.

stawastawa
23-Apr-2017, 00:26
Thank you for the idea HihoSilver, I look forward to seeing your shots and maybe we can go shoot there sometime?

HMG
23-Apr-2017, 07:19
Hello, long time lurker here. Glad to be able to see your directly-uploaded images now.

Here's a Toronto apartment building c. 1915. Not many were built in this period owing to an apartment 'ban' in 1912.


Shot on HP5+ @ 100 through a 90 Super-Angulon f8 with red filter. Scanned with an Epson 10000XL.


I look at these grand old buildings and wonder what will people think - in a hundred years - of the buildings we build today. Of course, the apartment buildings I see built today are unlikely to last more than 30 years (by design).

I'm trying to figure out those apparent doors on top in the center. Appears to be an exterior doorknob, but no balcony.

BTW, next time you're there to photograph, you have my permission to have the cars towed. :)

grjonathan
23-Apr-2017, 12:06
I look at these grand old buildings and wonder what will people think - in a hundred years - of the buildings we build today. Of course, the apartment buildings I see built today are unlikely to last more than 30 years (by design).

I'm trying to figure out those apparent doors on top in the center. Appears to be an exterior doorknob, but no balcony.

BTW, next time you're there to photograph, you have my permission to have the cars towed. :)

You're correct about the balcony. Seems the railing was removed 5 years ago.

hsandler
5-May-2017, 21:07
The Royal Aberdeen Pavilion, aka The Cattle Castle, at Lansdowne Park in Ottawa. Speed Graphic 4x5, Wollensak Optar 135mm f4.7 lens. HP5 film, yellow filter.
http://c1.staticflickr.com/4/3703/32789900814_0c421e7e2a_b.jpg

grjonathan
6-May-2017, 08:26
Wow, would never expect such a dark sky from a yellow filter.

hsandler
6-May-2017, 09:32
Wow, would never expect such a dark sky from a yellow filter.

Yes, surprised me too. It was a "deep yellow" filter, but also the sky was exceedingly a clear blue that day, with no clouds, and I "printed down" the negative considerably to retain detail in the very bright reflection from the domes, which are painted silver and have specular reflections of the sun. I know it looks like infrared, but it's just plain old HP5.

tgtaylor
20-Jun-2017, 10:17
Historic Fort Point Lifeboat Station - San Francisco, 2014.

http://spiritsofsilver.com/yahoo_site_admin/assets/images/GG-Life-Saving-Station.169164929_large.jpg

For an interesting history of the Lifeboat and Life-Saving Stations in the US, see https://www.nps.gov/goga/learn/historyculture/upload/Physical%20History%20Part%201-3.pdf

Toyo 810G, salted paper print.

Thomas

NOTE: The boathouse is visible directly behind the main structure.

dasBlute
20-Jun-2017, 10:27
I've always loved the architecture of those buildings, this looks like a very fine print, nice work

hendrik faure
5-Jul-2017, 06:55
http://i1322.photobucket.com/albums/u568/hfa8/townhall%20duderstadt_zpsftvwf6yc.jpg
Duderstadt town hall
stone basement from 1302
timbered wood from 16th century

Duderstadt is a german town first mentioned 929
in 15th century it was as big as Hamburg (4000 inhabitants).
Today it is a quiet town with a centre of 600 timber wood houses and some churches and with orthopedic high-tec industry, whose owner donated a (photography-liking) Art centre to the town.

Apologize the distorted picture. I took it yesterday with an 8x10 snapshot-camera free hand without viewfinder. Because of service- cars and some tourists I had to stand near by.
However I show the scan, because in Oktober Duderstadt takes part in a local festival for the benefit of timbered wood cities in lower saxony.
I will exhibit there photogravures and some other work in an abandonned slaughterhouse (see thread "anouncements" soon).
The festival is surely worth a detour.
If anybody passes by, please take a better picture and post here.
hendrik

neil poulsen
5-Jul-2017, 21:46
Historic Fort Point Lifeboat Station - San Francisco, 2014.

http://spiritsofsilver.com/yahoo_site_admin/assets/images/GG-Life-Saving-Station.169164929_large.jpg

For an interesting history of the Lifeboat and Life-Saving Stations in the US, see https://www.nps.gov/goga/learn/historyculture/upload/Physical%20History%20Part%201-3.pdf

Toyo 810G, salted paper print.

Thomas

NOTE: The boathouse is visible directly behind the main structure.

Nice composition.

kenj8246
8-Jul-2017, 09:08
Wow, would never expect such a dark sky from a yellow filter.

Me, as well. Striking!

hendrik faure
8-Jul-2017, 23:37
http://i1322.photobucket.com/albums/u568/hfa8/dudelmail_zpsuujftcq2.jpg
roman-katholic Basilica St. Cyriacus Duderstadt, built 1240 - 1490,here seen from the city house tower.
some of the other houses are rather new. They were built after a big fire in 1854

chassis
9-Jul-2017, 07:46
http://i1322.photobucket.com/albums/u568/hfa8/dudelmail_zpsuujftcq2.jpg
roman-katholic Basilica St. Cyriacus Duderstadt, built 1240 - 1490,here seen from the city house tower.
some of the other houses are rather new. They were built after a big fire in 1854




Very nice Hendrik!

hendrik faure
10-Jul-2017, 09:06
http://i1322.photobucket.com/albums/u568/hfa8/die%20andere%20Seite_zpsrfn56wte.jpg

thank you chassis,
this is the opposite view, in background the protestant St. Servatius Church, built from 1370.
Inside a well known organ. Duderstadt is a pleasant town and I look forward to have a workshow here

tgtaylor
10-Jul-2017, 20:57
Historic Fort Point - San Francisco.

http://spiritsofsilver.com/yahoo_site_admin/assets/images/Fort_Point.109230526_large.jpg

Situated on the south shore of the Golden Gate, Fort Point is best preserved example of America's "Third System" of civil war era military installations which includes Fort Sumter.. This view was taken from a 3d floor gun casement shows the columned walkways on the "living" side of the fort with the arched artillery casements on the opposite side. Straight ahead is the Pacific with the Golden Gate Strait running along the right. The original lighthouse is positioned at the top.

For a history and detailed description of Fort Point, see http://www.militarymuseum.org/Fort%20Point.html and especially the PDF Fort Point: Sentry at Golden Gate at https://www.nps.gov/fopo/learn/historyculture/index.htm

Toned Kallitype print taken on a rainy and overcast day with a 300mm Nikkor SW on a Toyo 810MII.

Thomas

DaveF
21-Jul-2017, 03:08
One from the weekend.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4319/35880839482_f9ed138ddd_h.jpg

Great Coxwell Barn, near Faringdon in Oxfordshire, is an amazing survivor. Built shortly after 1300, its internal ground measurements are 144 x 38 feet. It's now owned by the National Trust. According to their information, it is "a tremendously impressive witness to the great age of Gothic carpentry, and of monastic opulence." The influential victorian designer William Morris, who lived nearby, described it as "unapproachable in its dignity, as beautiful as a cathedral, yet with no ostentation of the builder's art."

Linhof Technikardan S45
Nikkor SW 75 f/4.5
Ilford Delta 100
25mm front rise
1 minute and 10 seconds at f/22

Digitized with D800E and 60mm micro, 4 frames stitched in CS6

chassis
21-Jul-2017, 13:55
One from the weekend.

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4319/35880839482_d1c1d39597_b.jpg

Great Coxwell Barn, near Faringdon in Oxfordshire, is an amazing survivor. Built shortly after 1300, its internal ground measurements are 144 x 38 feet. It's now owned by the National Trust. According to their information, it is "a tremendously impressive witness to the great age of Gothic carpentry, and of monastic opulence." The influential victorian designer William Morris, who lived nearby, described it as "unapproachable in its dignity, as beautiful as a cathedral, yet with no ostentation of the builder's art."

Linhof Technikardan S45
Nikkor SW 75 f/4.5
Ilford Delta 100
25mm front rise
1 minute and 10 seconds at f/22

Digitized with D800E and 60mm micro, 4 frames stitched in CS6

Dave, incredible! Are the main timbers from the 14th century?

neil poulsen
21-Jul-2017, 23:06
Dave, incredible! Are the main timbers from the 14th century?

No kidding. Very nice image!

evanbaines
25-Jul-2017, 11:15
http://amandabaines.com/webpost/sheldon-1.jpg

From WikiPedia: (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_Sheldon_Church_Ruins)

Known also as the Sheldon Church or Old Sheldon Church, the building was originally known as Prince William's Parish Church. The church was built as a chapel of ease in the English Georgian style, using the Roman Tuscan or Doric order, between 1745 and 1753. Prince William's was burned by the British in 1779 during the Revolutionary War. In 1826 it was rebuilt. The following is from an article in the April 1969 Sandlapper Magazine by Charles E. Thomas, “The Picturesque Ruins Of Old Sheldon Church”. “The official South Carolina report on the “Destruction of Churches and Church Property,” after the War Between the States, described Sheldon’s second burning: “All that was combustible was consumed..., its massive walls survive the last as they did the former conflagration,” Bishop Thomas wrote, “Exactly as it happened a hundred years before in 1779, when General Prevost, marching from Savannah into South Carolina burned the Church, so now in February 1865, General Sherman marching from Georgia into South Carolina, burned it a second time.”

An alternative view has more recently come to light, however. In a letter dated February 3, 1866,[4] Miton Leverett wrote that "Sheldon Church not burn't. Just torn up in the inside, but can be repaired." The inside of the church was apparently gutted to reuse materials to rebuild homes burnt by Sherman's army.

Wista 45vx, Nikkor 9SW, f/32, back tilt to keep overhanging branch in focus, up shift as shooting from near ground level, HP5+ in DD-X

Corran
25-Jul-2017, 11:24
Thank you for posting, that is an interesting place! I have never heard of it. I've been meaning to get back down to Savannah, so I'll have to remember that place.

chassis
25-Jul-2017, 18:21
http://amandabaines.com/webpost/sheldon-1.jpg

From WikiPedia: (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_Sheldon_Church_Ruins)


Wista 45vx, Nikkor 9SW, f/32, back tilt to keep overhanging branch in focus, up shift as shooting from near ground level, HP5+ in DD-X

Great!

K. Praslowicz
26-Jul-2017, 12:42
Greysolon plaza, Duluth MN.

First view is from a distance. This was in 2013 recreating one of the very first large format exposures (https://www.kpraslowicz.com/ten-years-ago-837) I ever made ten years earlier.

https://c41.kpraslowicz.com/photo/full/2016-10-02/greysolon-2013.jpg (https://www.kpraslowicz.com/greysolon-plaza-836)

And then again at the end of 2013 when snow accumulation caused the awning to collapse. It has since been restored.

https://c41.kpraslowicz.com/photo/full/2016-10-19/greysolon-collapse.jpg (https://www.kpraslowicz.com/greysolon-plaza-collapse-996)

profvandegraf
28-Jul-2017, 05:54
Yavapai County Courthouse, Prescott Arizona June 2017, Busch Pressman Model D.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/todd10/36084709661/in/dateposted-public/https://www.flickr.com/photos/todd10/36084709661/in/dateposted-public/

Sazerac
31-Jul-2017, 03:38
[QUOTE=evanbaines;1400138]http://amandabaines.com/webpost/sheldon-1.jpg

great image!

DaveF
5-Aug-2017, 06:23
Dave, incredible! Are the main timbers from the 14th century?

Thanks!
Some of the very oldest are, yes, though the building has undergone sensitive restoration using the traditional materials and techniques.

hendrik faure
6-Sep-2017, 06:08
https://photos-1.dropbox.com/t/2/AAC0NiG4qOWhg4Wt_d2TJuoAAioYdDJFsic7UOPf8tFtzQ/12/698838017/jpeg/32x32/1/_/1/2/dud%20ch%202.jpg/EI_z5eAFGAQgBygH/iHaTh55YUUo9Xvf17OtkoWi4D8KovOscWcb7HiZmdDM?size=2048x1536&size_mode=3

Duderstadt, St. Servatius Church, choir built 1370, seen from town hall tower.
I made this preparing a workshow in Oktober, see anouncements and the lounge
thank you for interest
hendrik

jesse
6-Sep-2017, 10:12
Ebony 4x5, 20cm f7.7 Collinear, FP4+

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4374/35883976853_92d870ad0f_h.jpg

chassis
6-Sep-2017, 18:59
Ebony 4x5, 20cm f7.7 Collinear, FP4+

https://farm5.staticflickr.com/4374/35883976853_92d870ad0f_h.jpg

Looks great Jesse!