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jonbrisbincreative
1-Mar-2016, 12:08
I'm considering adding whole plate and 8x10 but I need something to cut down the xray film to whole plate size. Will something like this work?

http://www.target.com/p/fiskars-premium-portable-paper-trimmer-12/-/A-12917568

jose angel
1-Mar-2016, 12:20
Personally, I hate this stripped down trimmers. I`d get a model with a larger board, -at least- a squared one with the length of the material to be cutted in both sides. If you want to have 8x10" sheets, get a 10"x10" board trimmer (a whole plate is a bit smaller than 8x10"), or larger.
BTW, I think straight blade (not that sharpened sabre type blades) guillotine type trimmers work best, but it may be matter of taste.

vinny
1-Mar-2016, 12:34
My wife has that trimmer and while it works for film, I'd go for something different if I were you. When you run the cutting head over whatever you're cutting, it's not clear if you've pressed hard enough to cut all the way through.

jonbrisbincreative
1-Mar-2016, 12:35
So something more like this:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004GB95GE/ref=s9_zwish_hd_bw_bXCSbz_g229_i1

seezee
1-Mar-2016, 12:40
I'm considering adding whole plate and 8x10 but I need something to cut down the xray film to whole plate size. Will something like this work?

http://www.target.com/p/fiskars-premium-portable-paper-trimmer-12/-/A-12917568

I use this (http://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B000W1YNNW) to cut down 8×10 to 4×5. I used some dyno tape to permanently mark the position of the film for each direction of cut & slide the movable guide over the tape before making the cut. The sheet holder does a good job of preventing the workpiece from moving as long as you don't try to cut more than 2 – 3 sheets at a time.

Sirius Glass
1-Mar-2016, 12:40
I find that blade cutters can cause the film/paper to rotate unless clamped down. Therefore I prefer cutters will a roller blade.

Jim Jones
1-Mar-2016, 12:56
To keep fingers off of the film while cutting, hinge a sheet of mat board on the side opposite the blade and trim it with the blade so it holds the film flat against the baseboard close to the blade. Apply pressure close to the blade while cutting. This prevents the film from rotating or buckling up. Seezee's tip about using Dymo tape sounds great. I've used the less elegant duct tape.

Jim C.
1-Mar-2016, 13:22
I have an older version of the Fiskars rotary paper cutter with a gray board and it cuts film and paper just fine.
You'll need to set a stop of some sort like thick tape to butt your film or paper against to cut accurately,
use a fubar film sheet or in your case for whole plate trim a sheet of stiff cardboard to whole plate size.
Come to think of it if you have a glass negative that's whole plate you could use that as a template.

I've been able to to cut fine slivers of film off with the Fiskars, only drawback is that you have to bear down on
the cutting head to cut. I've used gloves cutting film/paper.

I recently purchased a Rotatrim and have yet to try cutting film, seems it might be a lot better since you don't have to
bear down on the cutter head like you do on the Fiskars and the Rotatrim blades are self sharpening.
But Rotatrims are on spendy side.

Randy Moe
1-Mar-2016, 13:29
I use 2 Dahle brand economy cutters (http://www.dahle.com/products/trimmers/guillotines/vantage.htm) which have a very delicate rubber automatic clamp which softly contacts the film before the blade. I have 2 because I bought a small one first to test and then a big one for 14x17 Ektascan. I use them only for film, never paper, to limit dust. They cut very straight. I prefer them over my 24" Rotatrim.

This allows me to set 2 mat board production stops with gaff tape or just use their included guide. I use store bought old negs for pattern and never measure. Cut one piece of film at a time.

My fingers run very dry and not greasy. I wash them too often. I always wash with dish soap just before touching any film and dry thoroughly. No fingerprints.

c.d.ewen
1-Mar-2016, 13:41
Just my opinion: guillotines = good, Fiskars = not so good. The Fiskars' blades are quite small.

Rotatrims, however, = best. Here's a selection (http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/search?Ntt=rotatrim+cutter&N=0&InitialSearch=yes&sts=ma&Top+Nav-Search=) from B&H. Every time I use mine, I thank Dave Goldfarb for insisting I get the 24" Pro version, with the two rails.

Try out the cheapies first, and see how much you use it. Whichever you get, start cutting only one sheet at a time, as any cutter will have a tendency to pull the sheet(s) down with the blade. Doing multiple sheets, particularly without practice, will result in multiple-sized sheets.

Charley

Jim Galli
1-Mar-2016, 16:20
Nope. This is the one (http://www.walmart.com/ip/Fiskars-Desktop-Rotary-Trimmer/15266878). I use aerial recon 9.5 inch long roll film. Been cutting it for 10 years on one of these. Wrote it up here (http://www.apug.org/forum/index.php?threads/bulk-lf-film-cutting-and-loading-aerial-roll-film.5410/). It has the needed raised lip where the film rests in order to get straight 90 degree cuts, and the rail the roller is on holds the film pretty firmly when it's in the 'clamped' mode. Best I've found and I would be surprised if anyone has cut up more film than me, unless they worked for Eastman in the film rooms.

Drew Wiley
1-Mar-2016, 16:20
If Target or Office Depot sells it, it's junk, just plain junk. No, I'm not getting snooty. In fact, I have to stop at Target after work, but to buy mouthwash and toothpicks, not darkroom accessories. I like two-bar Rotatrims for large sheet goods, or working with the lights on. It's hard to find a decent guillotine trimmer,
but Dahle makes good ones. You need them real sharp, for a rapid cut on the film to keep from tugging it out of alignment. Then you need something to keep the
film square at exactly the right width. Then above all, you need some kind of safety bar to keep your fingers out of the way! Leftover fingers are too thick to
fit in your filmholder!

seezee
1-Mar-2016, 17:09
I use 2 Dahle brand economy cutters (http://www.dahle.com/products/trimmers/guillotines/vantage.htm) which have a very delicate rubber automatic clamp which softly contacts the film before the blade.

The cutter I referenced above has the same mechanism. As noted, it does a good job of keeping the workpiece from moving during the cut.

choiliefan
2-Mar-2016, 12:14
Rotary blade cutters really are the best for film as well as paper. I have an old Nikor from the '70's which was built to last. Doesn't have a movable stop for the desired film width bat as stated earlier, tape works fine.

scheinfluger_77
6-Mar-2016, 09:28
When I had my minilab back in the early 90's I used something very similar to this; http://www.amazon.com/Martin-Commercial-Stack-Cutter-7000E/dp/B0006VNRZI/ref=sr_1_36?s=office-products&ie=UTF8&qid=1457280996&sr=1-36&keywords=heavy+duty+stack+paper+cutter. It was $400 at the time and well worth it. I used it to cut the 1" blank edge off of stacks of 4x6's printed on 5" paper.

Recently I purchased something very close to this; http://www.amazon.com/Professional-Guillotine-Desktop-Stack-Cutter/dp/B003D6JQ62/ref=sr_1_18?s=office-products&ie=UTF8&qid=1457280947&sr=1-18&keywords=heavy+duty+stack+paper+cutter from an eBay store for about $100. I have yet to assemble it and try it but I will make a report once I have. It should work fine for film once you get the measurement set, and the recommended top sheet of cardboard for the top of the stack should do nicely for locking it down without scratching.

Randy Moe
6-Mar-2016, 09:48
I have never used one. We had a huge one in the factory. At this price I am very interested in how it would work with big stacks of film. Obviously dimension shift and emulsion damage is a paramount concern.



When I had my minilab back in the early 90's I used something very similar to this; http://www.amazon.com/Martin-Commercial-Stack-Cutter-7000E/dp/B0006VNRZI/ref=sr_1_36?s=office-products&ie=UTF8&qid=1457280996&sr=1-36&keywords=heavy+duty+stack+party per+cutter. It was $400 at the time and well worth it. I used it to cut the 1" blank edge off of stacks of 4x6's printed on 5" paper.

Recently I purchased something very close to this; http://www.amazon.com/Professional-Guillotine-Desktop-Stack-Cutter/dp/B003D6JQ62/ref=sr_1_18?s=office-products&ie=UTF8&qid=1457280947&sr=1-18&keywords=heavy+duty+stack+paper+cutter from an eBay store for about $100. I have yet to assemble it and try it but I will make a report once I have. It should work fine for film once you get the measurement set, and the recommended top sheet of cardboard for the top of the stack should do nicely for locking it down without scratching.

scheinfluger_77
6-Mar-2016, 11:56
I have never used one. We had a huge one in the factory. At this price I am very interested in how it would work with big stacks of film. Obviously dimension shift and emulsion damage is a paramount concern.

I think the key is in how well the pressure plate locks down the material. I am interested to see how this one does.

Bob Mann
6-Mar-2016, 13:27
I would suggest IR night vision goggles, it will make the job a lot easier if you can see what you are doing.

thomasfallon
6-Mar-2016, 16:42
Rototrim

Vaughn
6-Mar-2016, 16:48
Rototrim

Only cutter (two bars) I have used -- on 14x17 x-ray cut down to 7x17. Sure is nice being able to use red safe lights!!

Roger Thoms
6-Mar-2016, 16:53
Only cutter (two bars) I have used -- on 14x17 x-ray cut down to 7x17. Sure is nice being able to use red safe lights!!

Adds a whole new meaning to safe light.

Roger

Vaughn
6-Mar-2016, 21:45
Adds a whole new meaning to safe light. Roger

WTF? I know I am having both heart issues and asthma on top of it so the oxygen supply to my brain is questionable, but why is red safe lights any different than red safelights. Seen it both ways.

http://www.freestylephoto.biz/how-safe-are-your-darkroom-safe-lights

Jim Galli
6-Mar-2016, 21:50
WTF? I know I am having both heart issues and asthma on top of it so the oxygen supply to my brain is questionable, but why is red safe lights any different than red safelights. Seen it both ways.

http://www.freestylephoto.biz/how-safe-are-your-darkroom-safe-lights

I think it was a jest at operator safety as well as film safety what with all the sharp edges et al.

Randy Moe
6-Mar-2016, 22:55
You lost me...

I even read the Freestyle rant.

scheinfluger_77
26-Apr-2016, 12:07
When I had my minilab back in the early 90's I used something very similar to this; http://www.amazon.com/Martin-Commercial-Stack-Cutter-7000E/dp/B0006VNRZI/ref=sr_1_36?s=office-products&ie=UTF8&qid=1457280996&sr=1-36&keywords=heavy+duty+stack+paper+cutter. It was $400 at the time and well worth it. I used it to cut the 1" blank edge off of stacks of 4x6's printed on 5" paper.

Recently I purchased something very close to this; http://www.amazon.com/Professional-Guillotine-Desktop-Stack-Cutter/dp/B003D6JQ62/ref=sr_1_18?s=office-products&ie=UTF8&qid=1457280947&sr=1-18&keywords=heavy+duty+stack+paper+cutter from an eBay store for about $100. I have yet to assemble it and try it but I will make a report once I have. It should work fine for film once you get the measurement set, and the recommended top sheet of cardboard for the top of the stack should do nicely for locking it down without scratching.

FOLLOW-UP
1. Since posting I've set up this paper cutter and tried it on some film last night. I have some Kodak white box, blue half-speed (10x12) that I got for cheap so we will see how that works out.

2. This image shows the set up for 5" cuts. The fence at the back with the scale on it is adjustable so you can square it. The instructions suggested using a carpenters square, but the Squangle® I tried to use was too big, so I ended up using a piece of mat board. A draftsman triangle should work too.

The part I don't like is, the back stop (green thing) is not attached to the fence. It is loose and attaches to the bottom plate only with magnets. I paid too much attention to price only and missed this fact and I think this magnetic approach would be problematic in complete darkness, hence the clamp. It sort of worked. If you buy one, be sure to get a cutter with a back stop that locks down securely to the fence.

3. In complete darkness I open the box and pulled out 7 sheets so I could see what it looks like and experiment with.

4. I inserted three sheets of the 10" side and used a few sheets of old printer paper for bottom and top pressure plates. The blade and the clamp will have some oil on them so you must pay attention to cleaning them before cutting.

150105 150106 150107 150108
two more in next post.

Testing all 9 pieces indicated that the fit was the same and looking at the stack the cuts were straight and very close, less than .5 mm I think. That may have been my error as I bumped the back stop and had to reset it.

I'm going to try cutting this under safelight tonight to see how that goes. This box is marked for safelight "Type M", which I've never heard of but there is a Kodak pub. that indicates this is the same as a #13, http://www.kodak.com/global/en/professional/support/techPubs/ti0845/ti0845.pdf. I don't have any #13's but I do have the Randy Moe approved Superbrightleds red bulb. I don’t know if that is safe for this film but I will do a test later this spring. One bulb lights up my 54"/2 powder room like crazy, even when reflected of the medium yellow walls.

scheinfluger_77
26-Apr-2016, 12:08
5. Here is the first cut made.

6. I tried both ends of all three pieces and they slid in and out nicely. Taking the remaining 7x10 inch sheets I made two more cuts with the same setup, getting 6 more 5x7's. This photo looks like the film is crinkling while loading, but it isn't.


150109 150110
Notice this stuff is gold in color. I don't think I remember anyone mentioning gold x-ray film in
The Thread...

seezee
26-Apr-2016, 17:24
I don't have any #13's but I do have the Randy Moe approved Superbrightleds red bulb. I don’t know if that is safe for this film but I will do a test later this spring. One bulb lights up my 54"/2 powder room like crazy, even when reflected of the medium yellow walls.

I have cut this film under a pair of those LED bulbs with no noticeable fogging. But I haven't done any testing for base fog, so YMMV. And I point the lights, which are in a clamping work-light with a reflector, away from the floor, where I'm working, and up to a corner where the light is reflected only.

Duolab123
26-Apr-2016, 18:12
I would suggest IR night vision goggles, it will make the job a lot easier if you can see what you are doing.

10 Thumbs up for the IR goggles!!!!!!!!!!!. I have Rota Trim , Martin Yale both are great. Also you might look for a cheap little Dahle (Blue sheet metal) If you are only cutting a few sheets spend your money on some cheap toy goggles and get a rotary trimmer. The Martin Yale will cut 50 sheets at a time, overkill. Watch out for China copies of the Martin Yale , ain't the same.

Grumium
3-May-2016, 14:56
Has anyone ever tried/succeeded to cut down film within a Harrison changing tent? I have the Jumbo-version and am tinkering with the idea of cutting 4x10 from 8x10.