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Sven1965
25-Jan-2016, 14:22
Orton Effect with LF film
Has anyone ever tried it? I'm considering two possibilities; 1) double exposure of the same image one exposure correctly focused, the second out of focus or possibly a different f/stop. 2) Making two exposures with the enlarger, one in focus the second out of focus. The second may be a little easier to pull off.

I'm curious if anyone has experience.

Jac@stafford.net
25-Jan-2016, 14:32
The original used two or three exposures with one in focus and the others slightly out of focus, and adjusting the focal length of the lens to maintain image register. It would be possible with a single focal length by adjusting each image size at the enlarger but IMHO it is too much effort for me. Some 12 year with a later version of Photoshop is probably churning them out via a built-in action.

Sven1965
25-Jan-2016, 14:44
Yes, doing it in PS is pretty easy. Stacking negatives is a possibility I hadn't considered, but sounds difficult to keep the images in register...

Drew Wiley
25-Jan-2016, 14:55
Pretty easy to do if you convert a registered graphics "stat" camera into a studio view camera. Still life, of course, that doesn't move.

Drew Bedo
28-Jan-2016, 09:19
Not sure I get the point. I spend most of my time trying to produce sharp images with more DOF . . .

I must not understand something.

Sven1965
28-Jan-2016, 09:50
Not sure I get the point. I spend most of my time trying to produce sharp images with more DOF . . .

I must not understand something.

It's an interesting effect. The print is sharp, the effect, out of focus area, causes a halo around the sharp part of the image. It gives the print an eerie, surreal look.

Jac@stafford.net
28-Jan-2016, 10:03
It's an interesting effect. The print is sharp, the effect, out of focus area, causes a halo around the sharp part of the image. It gives the print an eerie, surreal look.

I almost forgot that I experimented with what I will call anti-unsharp masks. It is done by making an unsharp mask, then making a positive of the mask. When printing dodge out areas you wish to remain sharp. An example here. (http://www.digoliardi.net/jk.jpg)

Sven1965
28-Jan-2016, 10:11
Yes! That is exactly what I'm talking about. More details in how you made the mask?