PDA

View Full Version : Again about bags for LF



Professional
20-Jan-2016, 03:26
Hi all,

I would like to know what recommendations or options there for a bag that can accommodate a body of LF [say up to 8x10 but for now it is 4x5] with up to 4 lenses and few film holders and another accessories such as a light meter and shutter release and maybe few film sheets boxes?

I never shoot with LF since i did in very long time ago due to i didn't decide on a bag that time that i can use to carry my LF body with 2 lenses and few holders and other smaller stuff, once i can get that bag then it will be easier for me to go out shooting with LF, and something happened to me that made me to stop before but that is gone and now slowly i am getting back to photography overall and hope with film and LF too if i figure out a good bag for that hiking purpose.

Drew Bedo
20-Jan-2016, 06:34
Well for 4x5 (but NOT 8x10) I have been using a LowePro "Magnum-35" shoulder bag. It holds my little Wista mfg Zone VI, 3-4 lenses , film holders, tripod and everything else—weighs 22-25 pounds depending. .

Started out with a LowePro back pack (an older Trekker-something model) but I'm not a hiker really and the shoulder bag is more compact. However the backpqack and the whole 4x5 kit did get tossed into an airliner's cargo hold once and traveled well. Now the Trekker stores my 8x10 Kodak 2D in the closet. If you want to go both ways, maybe the backpack route is for you.

In the city (Houston) I sometimes transport the 4x5 gear in a hard shelll computer case. It has wheels and attracts less attention than the shoulder bag.

Any Help?

Peter Lewin
20-Jan-2016, 09:11
You could try a "WTB" (Want To Buy) entry in the "For Sale/Wanted" section for a Photobackpacker pack. Many of us feel that these are the best LF packs around, but unfortunately the company just went out of business. At one time there were a number of people trying to sell their "P2" packs in order to replace them with the newer "P3" versions.

HMG
20-Jan-2016, 21:36
The bag that I have that works best for my 4x5 field is an older bag made for a video camera. Maybe whatever came after vhs cameras as not quite big enough for those.

chris_4622
21-Jan-2016, 06:02
I have a P3 that is brand new. Contact me through PM if interested.

John Kasaian
21-Jan-2016, 09:11
I have a LowePro for the 8x10. It is a beast.
Actually it is a excellent argument for getting different kind of beast---a pack mule.
Ansel knew what he was doing.

Sirius Glass
21-Jan-2016, 09:54
I have been happy with the Tamron 750 and 752 Super Photo backpacks because they are top loaders. The photobackparker.com did a going out of business sale here and on APUG and now I am a big fan of his P3 pack system. Contact him and see if he will sell you any of his remaining stock.

neil poulsen
21-Jan-2016, 10:16
I looked all over L.A. (at the time) for my backpack. It's about 23"x14"x7" and has completely open space on the inside with no compartments. No padded sides either, which can substantially increase the weight. Just durable cloth sides.

It has a zippered, 23"x14" cover, which itself has a smaller, simpler backpack attached to it that's large enough to hold 8x10 film holders. (Or smaller, of course.)

I can easily fit my Deardorff 8x10 in its Photobackpacker case at the bottom of the pack with room for four lenses towards the top. It's also excellent for my 4x5 kit, which has more lenses.

Patrick Gauthier
24-Jun-2016, 21:53
I've been shooting a lot in the mountains and have been using the Lowepro Flipside Sport 20L. Inside the bag, in the removable camera compartment, it fits my Wista 45n, 3 lenses, pentax 5 spotmeter, 8 fidelty elite filmholders, and some other accessories (air blower, microfiber, sometimes cokin graduate filter set). On the outside it fits a tripod nicely. There's an additional side pocket meant for water, but I usually use it for bear spray as I typically have a helper who carries the water!. The font zipper pocket can hold wallet, ID, keys, even some extra film holders and filters. The front has a shock cord/bungee cord straps that can be used to secure other gear. I typically use it to secure snowshoes, crampons, or clothing (it's actually quite strong/durable so far). It also includes a waterproof shell (these can be surprisingly pricey so it's a nice feature). You can get more info from the lowepro website.

Overall in terms of ergonomics, with a 20-25 lbs load, it's decent, even over 8-12 hours of hiking. If fits me small and I'm 6'2". The unzipping backside is brilliant for accessing gear. I would not recommend the bag for long days if your load is 30+ lbs though. It would probably be uncomfortable to most.

Also, if you're solo and doing long days, there is not a lot of extra room for food and water.

However, the removable camera compartment means that you can still keep your LF gear contained in a larger bag, as I've done for multiday trips (just remove the inner compartment and put it in a larger bag).

Functionally I think I would find it difficult to replace. It's ugly as hell though. . . but most camera bags are :p

Jim Noel
25-Jun-2016, 09:01
I have always had better luck buying bags (backpacks) for my LF equipment at good camping stores. They are usually lighter,at least as durable, better constructed and cheaper. My favorite is an internal frame in which I carry my 7x17 with lenses and accessories. I have had it for quite a few years and paid about $50 for it. I hate to think how massive and heavy one would be in comparison if manufactured by a camera bag company.

Kirk Gittings
25-Jun-2016, 09:22
I have always had better luck buying bags (backpacks) for my LF equipment at good camping stores. They are usually lighter,at least as durable, better constructed and cheaper. My favorite is an internal frame in which I carry my 7x17 with lenses and accessories. I have had it for quite a few years and paid about $50 for it. I hate to think how massive and heavy one would be in comparison if manufactured by a camera bag company.

Agree in general but that does not apply to the PBP bags. All versions of them have been just slightly modified versions of existing real backpacks. The main modification has been the addition of of a female/loop velcro "backerboard" which is extremely light weight. From there one can use numerous inserts or not which stick to the backer board. I use a 3 lens case and camera case, both of which are very light weight. My other gear just gets stuffed around those. This scenario doesn't mean much if one uses 7x17 however :)

Bill_1856
25-Jun-2016, 09:42
Domke F2. (Up to 4x5)

Jerry Bodine
25-Jun-2016, 10:57
Don't forget to consider how to accommodate the tripod.

The Joker
25-Jun-2016, 11:03
look up fishing bags. You'll find something just as good and half the price or less than a bag being sold as a camera bag.

Ari
26-Jun-2016, 05:50
Another suggestion is EVOC backpacks; they're mountaineering bags made in Austria, and are of excellent quality.
I bought the CP35L because my previous 8x10 was quite bulky, but most 8x10 and smaller camera kits should fit inside the CP26L.
http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1086234-REG/rotor_components_evcp_26lrd_cp_26l_camera_pack.html

Drew Bedo
26-Jun-2016, 16:50
Another thought:

Hazard4 is an outfit that specializes in "Tactical" bags and packs. They have a line of photo bags that look really rugged. This one might work for a 4x5 kit.

https://www.hazard4.com/bags/photo-bags/photo-recon.html

jnanian
26-Jun-2016, 18:46
tenba car case

Drew Wiley
27-Jun-2016, 08:36
Oh gosh .... too early in the day for this subject. My main LF daypack probably won't last another five miles, so I pulled one of my brand new (unused 70's mfg) Kelty frame packs from the stockpile and started fiddling with it. Nearly there. Took it on a brief hike out on Pt Reyes this past Sat with my Norma system, but gotta tweak some more things tonite. In the meantime, I fitted another brand new bigger frame pack (80's vintage Camp Trails) for my long-haul LF backpacking
trips, exactly matched to the relatively new one I reserve only for such trips. This way when one wears out, there will be an identical one to replace it and buy
me time for repair, if I can still find the parts. Gosh... the only way I can stay sane is to have multiple kits all set up, ready to go. Retirement is going to be rough! I mean, that bucket list of places to hike and things to shoot .... Now I gotta get my truck AC fixed....

Luis-F-S
27-Jun-2016, 09:29
For 4x5 there is the infamous Zone VI white bag.

Drew Wiley
27-Jun-2016, 10:22
I use a shoulder bag for casual MF work, but am a bit skeptical about hauling even lightwt 4x5 field camera gear that way unless the distance is particularly short. Sounds like a recipe for an awfully stiff neck the next day!

seezee
27-Jun-2016, 11:33
Oh gosh .... too early in the day for this subject. My main LF daypack probably won't last another five miles, so I pulled one of my brand new (unused 70's mfg) Kelty frame packs from the stockpile and started fiddling with it. Nearly there. Took it on a brief hike out on Pt Reyes this past Sat with my Norma system, but gotta tweak some more things tonite. In the meantime, I fitted another brand new bigger frame pack (80's vintage Camp Trails) for my long-haul LF backpacking
trips, exactly matched to the relatively new one I reserve only for such trips. This way when one wears out, there will be an identical one to replace it and buy
me time for repair, if I can still find the parts. Gosh... the only way I can stay sane is to have multiple kits all set up, ready to go. Retirement is going to be rough! I mean, that bucket list of places to hike and things to shoot .... Now I gotta get my truck AC fixed....

Drew, what modifications or adjustments have you made to your Kelty pack? I've seen other recommendations for them on the forum maybe you & it looks like they are plentiful on FleaBay, so I'm considering getting one.

Drew Wiley
27-Jun-2016, 13:34
That's an embarrassing question. The classic large Tioga pack that fit me so well in my 30's and 40's has seemingly shrunk! Yes, my shoulders are even wider due to decades of backpacking; but certain other parts of my anatomy are also increasing with age. The Kelty has a funny little yoke holding the straps at the bottom, which ended up uncomfortably rubbing against my "spare tire", so I simply installed a threaded stainless chain link where the two join, each side, and that turned the strap position 90 degrees where it's not rubbing. Easy fix. A small carabiner would also work. I also replace all the susceptible aluminum clevis pins with stainless ones for greater durability, or else actual stainless bolts and aircraft nuts, plus delrin washers. Then I add an extra back band and cover it with lambswool pads. For dayhikes I put interchangeable Rubbermaid plastic wastebaskets into the top compartment, each holding a different camera system. Tonite I gotta pick up straps etc at REI for lashing on my big CF tripod across the top. But I simply strap my Ries wooden tripods on vertically with bunji cords.
Should be ready to try out on a 7 or 8 mile hike this coming weekend.

Drew Wiley
27-Jun-2016, 14:03
... The problem with all these classic frame packs is that spare hip pads, back meshes, and straps are no longer available, yet routinely wear out long before the
pack frame itself. But if you shop around you can typically find entire spare packs for less than what these components originally cost by themselves. One
annoying thing about the auction site is that the item itself might seem quite a bargain, but a lot of these listing have outright obscene shipping charges attached. It takes a bit of patience. Or try garage sales is you're in an outdoorsy community. There are a lot of wannabees who buy expensive camping gear then never get around to using it at all, then suddenly decide to clean out some closet. ... Anyway, I'll swing by the plastics shop tonite too, to pick up a sheet of lightweight honeycomb styrene, which will make a nice divider system for my 8x10 folder. The side pockets on the old Kelty's are a bit small for the bigger 8x10 lenses; but there's plenty of room overall if the main compartment is divided with barriers.

seezee
27-Jun-2016, 17:54
That's an embarrassing question. The classic large Tioga pack that fit me so well in my 30's and 40's has seemingly shrunk! Yes, my shoulders are even wider due to decades of backpacking; but certain other parts of my anatomy are also increasing with age. The Kelty has a funny little yoke holding the straps at the bottom, which ended up uncomfortably rubbing against my "spare tire", so I simply installed a threaded stainless chain link where the two join, each side, and that turned the strap position 90 degrees where it's not rubbing. Easy fix. A small carabiner would also work. I also replace all the susceptible aluminum clevis pins with stainless ones for greater durability, or else actual stainless bolts and aircraft nuts, plus delrin washers. Then I add an extra back band and cover it with lambswool pads. For dayhikes I put interchangeable Rubbermaid plastic wastebaskets into the top compartment, each holding a different camera system. Tonite I gotta pick up straps etc at REI for lashing on my big CF tripod across the top. But I simply strap my Ries wooden tripods on vertically with bunji cords.
Should be ready to try out on a 7 or 8 mile hike this coming weekend.

Yankee ingenuity! Thanks, Drew!

Drew Wiley
28-Jun-2016, 08:59
When I get a break today I'll ask one of the ex-Marines here about combat "alice" packs. These can still be obtained US mfg and obviously have a helluva lot of
pockets, but are expensive and rather heavy, even empty. But it might be a suitable option for someone. The same outfits make folding frames for carrying big
game, which could be fitted with custom sewn packs, probably for not much more than some dedicated camera-store style packs, but not cheap either. I have a
number of Camp Trails packs which are fairly solid, though every version of these has some annoying idiosyncrasy which has to be re-tweaked at considerably
more effort than Keltys. At least removing four new packs from the house, refitting them, and wrapping the spares for storage on the shop loft instead of the family room should prolong my own life, or spare me from sleeping on the porch with the cats.

brennanphotoguy
7-Jul-2016, 05:42
You could probably try a F-Stop Gear bag. They seem like awesome technical packs with interchangeable inserts so you can adjust it for what your're carrying. I'd love to get one when I can afford it but my Lowepro ProTactic 450AW does just fine for now.

HMG
7-Jul-2016, 06:48
When I get a break today I'll ask one of the ex-Marines here about combat "alice" packs. These can still be obtained US mfg and obviously have a helluva lot of
pockets, but are expensive and rather heavy, even empty. But it might be a suitable option for someone. The same outfits make folding frames for carrying big
game, which could be fitted with custom sewn packs, probably for not much more than some dedicated camera-store style packs, but not cheap either. I have a
number of Camp Trails packs which are fairly solid, though every version of these has some annoying idiosyncrasy which has to be re-tweaked at considerably
more effort than Keltys. At least removing four new packs from the house, refitting them, and wrapping the spares for storage on the shop loft instead of the family room should prolong my own life, or spare me from sleeping on the porch with the cats.

I don't think those Alice packs (http://www.sportsmansguide.com/product/index/complete-us-military-surplus-large-alice-pack-with-metal-frame-used?a=1909121) would work as well as your vintage Keltys (and they are heavy). Replacement shoulder straps and hip belts used to be sold; not sure if still are. New external frame packs are still available.

No doubt there are still many still sitting in closets and garages of aged Boy Scouts. That's all we used for serious trips in my kids troop in the 90s. Much better (and cheaper) than internal frame packs of that era.

seezee
7-Jul-2016, 12:54
No doubt there are still many still sitting in closets and garages of aged Boy Scouts. That's all we used for serious trips in my kids troop in the 90s. Much better (and cheaper) than internal frame packs of that era.

Vintage Keltys are cheap & plentiful on the big auction site.

Drew Wiley
7-Jul-2016, 13:14
Now that I got my Kelty all tweaked correctly I took it for a good uphill hike out on the coast last weekend with my 8x10 gear. Can just as easily use it for my 4x5
Norma or 6x7 Pentax kit. When buying used Keltys you have to be cognizant of both size and country of origin. The better ones are usually classified as "vintage"
and were made in Glendale CA. But sometimes "vintage" gear turns up completely unused. What you cannot find anymore are replacement straps, backbands, or
hip belts; so you want to carefully examine any photos to make sure these parts are still in very good condition.

Drew Wiley
7-Jul-2016, 13:23
... Oh, one significant difference between an all-purpose external frame like this and dedicated photo gear packs is that you can carry a lot of other stuff in them
too. For example, for two decades I carried a Sinar 4x5 field camera system in a Kelty Tioga along with full backpacking supplies for up to ten days of steep off-trail mountain terrain. Back then I had no problem with 85 or 90 pound packs day after day, and trained myself to subsist on only one meal a day. Now that I'm
getting old and lazy I prefer far more food in the pack and have switched over to a light little Ebony 4x5 folder for long haul treks, along with more petite lenses.
I also use a much bigger Camp Trails packs for such excursions, rather than Keltys, though these are significantly more work to tune-up.

Drew Bedo
9-Jul-2016, 05:21
Try looking for a real real-deal sleeper on www.shopgoodwill.com

Sometimes a high-end item or close-out sneaks in and slips by.

John Kasaian
9-Jul-2016, 08:49
When I get a break today I'll ask one of the ex-Marines here about combat "alice" packs. These can still be obtained US mfg and obviously have a helluva lot of
pockets, but are expensive and rather heavy, even empty. But it might be a suitable option for someone. The same outfits make folding frames for carrying big
game, which could be fitted with custom sewn packs, probably for not much more than some dedicated camera-store style packs, but not cheap either. I have a
number of Camp Trails packs which are fairly solid, though every version of these has some annoying idiosyncrasy which has to be re-tweaked at considerably
more effort than Keltys. At least removing four new packs from the house, refitting them, and wrapping the spares for storage on the shop loft instead of the family room should prolong my own life, or spare me from sleeping on the porch with the cats.
The large ALICE is a brutal mistress. Trust me on this---I had one. Remember those old McClelland saddles, Drew? I suspect both the ALICE and the McClelland were designed by the same demonic.

pjd
9-Jul-2016, 18:34
You could probably try a F-Stop Gear bag. They seem like awesome technical packs with interchangeable inserts so you can adjust it for what your're carrying. I'd love to get one when I can afford it but my Lowepro ProTactic 450AW does just fine for now.

I use an F-stop bag, it's great. I took it on a couple of mini treks in Peru last year, it was excellent. It opens up at the back which allows very easy and fast access to equipment. I've had trouble using a regular hiking backpack with LF gear in the past, I had a 9x12 camera in a Deuter backpack. The Deuter pack was good for most stuff except photographic gear, access was tricky.

Since then I've found it's possible to squeeze an 8x10 2D kit (without the rear rail) into into the F stop guru - the smallest bag in their line. The camera just about slides in through the top loading zips. It surprises people to see such a chunky camera emerge from a comparatively small pack. I'd like to get a slightly larger F-stop pack but international shipping and import taxes have put me off so far.

brennanphotoguy
10-Jul-2016, 10:20
I use an F-stop bag, it's great. I took it on a couple of mini treks in Peru last year, it was excellent. It opens up at the back which allows very easy and fast access to equipment. I've had trouble using a regular hiking backpack with LF gear in the past, I had a 9x12 camera in a Deuter backpack. The Deuter pack was good for most stuff except photographic gear, access was tricky.

Since then I've found it's possible to squeeze an 8x10 2D kit (without the rear rail) into into the F stop guru - the smallest bag in their line. The camera just about slides in through the top loading zips. It surprises people to see such a chunky camera emerge from a comparatively small pack. I'd like to get a slightly larger F-stop pack but international shipping and import taxes have put me off so far.

Yeah and I hear their customer service is not very good. Long wait times for products after you've paid if they are backordered. The owner actually just wrote a blog post about it but it's still unnerving. I'd think you could fit a good sized kit in an Ajna or a Tilopa with the right ICU combo. Get an ICU just for the camera and another for the accessories like the holders, lens(es), etc.

Drew Bedo
11-Jul-2016, 05:18
"Nuther thought on alternative solutions. If the idea is to put an LF kit into a premium back pack for serious hiking (have I stated the problem correctly?), take a look at the padded divider inserts sold separately from bags and packs. Then put that into a backpack designed for serious back-country travel.

Am I totally off-topic with this concept?

Drew Wiley
11-Jul-2016, 11:07
Padded dividers are just a lot of redundant extra weight. I make my dividers out of ultralight corrugated styrene board, which takes mere seconds to size on my
matcutter, then supplement this with bubble wrap.

brennanphotoguy
14-Jul-2016, 10:20
I just checked out a Lowepro Whistler back pack too. Those are pretty sweet and might do the trick as well.

Alan Gales
14-Jul-2016, 13:16
I'm disabled. I've had a back fusion and cannot use a back pack. For my 8x10 Wehman camera I use this: https://www.amazon.com/Klein-Tools-55452RTB-Tradesman-Organizer/dp/B00BZXA35I/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1468526725&sr=8-4&keywords=tool+bags+klein

I can pack one or two lenses with the camera in the bag, usually my 14" Commercial Ektar and either the 250mm Fuji or 19" Artar (no small lenses here). I also sometimes carry a cheap vinyl cooler that sits on top of the Klein bag. I can put extra lenses and film holders in it. I carry my tripod with my other hand and no, I don't get to far from my Jeep with it but that is due to my physical limitations.

Just another option for you to look at.

diversey
14-Jul-2016, 13:57
This rolling bag is very neat! I may need one too:).


I'm disabled. I've had a back fusion and cannot use a back pack. For my 8x10 Wehman camera I use this: https://www.amazon.com/Klein-Tools-55452RTB-Tradesman-Organizer/dp/B00BZXA35I/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1468526725&sr=8-4&keywords=tool+bags+klein

I can pack one or two lenses with the camera in the bag, usually my 14" Commercial Ektar and either the 250mm Fuji or 19" Artar (no small lenses here). I also sometimes carry a cheap vinyl cooler that sits on top of the Klein bag. I can put extra lenses and film holders in it. I carry my tripod with my other hand and no, I don't get to far from my Jeep with it but that is due to my physical limitations.

Just another option for you to look at.

Myxine
14-Jul-2016, 15:59
I bought a f-stop backpack with a large ICU a few years ago that I use a lot for hiking and LF. It works really well. Solid and comfortable on a hike. Love the fact that it opens fully from the back.
I can put a 4x5 with 3 lenses, 6 holders and accessories ( light meter, filters...) quite easily.
Just came back from a trip with my 5x7 and it s a different story: the 5x7 just fits in the main ICU and I put lenses in wraps in a different compartment. It works but it s not the best, really.
At the same time I feel that hiking with a 5x7 is some kind of limit for me :)


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

AtlantaTerry
15-Jul-2016, 00:59
Until I find something better, I'm using a padded bag originally designed for laptop computers. In the main side compartment, I can store my new 4x5" Chamonix 045F1 camera plus 3 lenses. To protect them, I wrap the lenses with micro-fiber cloth from Dollar Tree's automobile care section - the fabric is soft and thick. I paid US $5 at a Salvation Army Thrift Store for the bag. I have seen similar bags at computer stores for about US $20 or $30.

In other compartments I can fit some sheet film holders, cable releases, my Sekonic light meter, etc.

The nice thing about the laptop bag is the main section unzips so as to fully open.

For carrying additional sheet film holders I have some cases with shoulder straps that were designed to hold 4 sheet film holders. I have no idea what company made them or where I got them a long time ago.

I once read that a good place to look for cases to transport lenses are fishing supply stores. Evidently they have cases to transport fishing reels. I have a couple Dick's Sporting Goods stores in my area that I'm going to visit.

Here is a Shimano Bhaltair Reel Bag:
152884
http://www.dickssportinggoods.com/product/index.jsp?productId=16561936


A friend uses a bag designed to carry broadcast-sized portable video cameras. The nice thing about it is the top fully opens which allows easy access to the contents. If I remember correctly, the brand is PortaBrace:
http://www.portabrace.com/

Alan Gales
15-Jul-2016, 06:36
This rolling bag is very neat! I may need one too:).

It's made for wheeling around construction sites so wheeling around Chicago would be a breeze! I had a cheaper no name bag to begin with but it had small wheels. The larger wheels on the Klein bag really help.

pjd
15-Jul-2016, 07:33
Yeah and I hear their customer service is not very good. Long wait times for products after you've paid if they are backordered. The owner actually just wrote a blog post about it but it's still unnerving. I'd think you could fit a good sized kit in an Ajna or a Tilopa with the right ICU combo. Get an ICU just for the camera and another for the accessories like the holders, lens(es), etc.

Interesting about the customer service - I bought my bag second hand, found it through craigslist, it was the first I'd heard of the company. Good to know about the delays, I'll be careful about ordering from them if I ever do get a bigger bag. When I put the 2D in the backpack I don't use the ICU, I just fit the camera through the top of the bag. The ICU is fairly handily sized for fitting a Majestic tripod head I recently bought inside though.

Chester McCheeserton
16-Jul-2016, 13:17
I recently spent way too much time researching this topic to get a pack that would hold my 5x7 Deardorff, 3 lenses, and a decent amount of holders. I just returned from a 10 day trip to Iceland and was very happy with this setup. It's not for everyone, prob a little big for 4x5 and a little small for 8x10, and the protection isn't likely as good as an F-stop or Photobackbacker set-up. I was looking for ultra minimal, and ultra comfort for hikes of 1 to 3 hours away from the car. I also used just the pack without the dividers with a wista 4x5 with one lens on a 3 night camping trip to Pear Lake in the Sierras and was able to cram a sleeping bag, food, sleeping pad, and a couple other bare essentials, and it worked although if I were doing that type of trip more often I'd get something bigger. I got a Mystery Ranch 'Scree' backpack, I think it's suspension system is top notch. To hold the camera I got an orange case through Amazon from Hong Kong made by 'A-Mode' and simply removed all the interior velcro dividers. It fits the deardorff wrapped in a darkcloth almost perfectly.
For the holders I got an "Ape Case' yellow pouch from B+H, it fits 7 or 8 5x7 holders just right. For the lenses I got a blue FishPond fishing reel case from Fishwest that fits my 180, 135, and 300 lenses on 4x4 boards.152936152937152938152939

Chester McCheeserton
16-Jul-2016, 13:24
Here's the other pics. Only going into so much detail in case it might be useful for someone else with the same camera. 152940152941152942

I was using a crumpler 'Whickey and cox' for several years before this and felt that it had way too much padding and it simply wasn't comfortable for more than about a half-mile and I could only fit one lens and 4 holders in it. Am much happier with this setup although I certainly wouldn't check this set-up on a plane or want to drop it. I carry the tripod in my hand and don't use a meter.

Axelwik
17-Jul-2016, 20:21
I use a Mountainsmith "Cube" bag. Around $40 to $60 depending on where you get it. Fits in a backpack while hiking, and perfectly sized for a standard roll-type carry on suitcase.

http://www.ebags.com/product/mountainsmith/kit-cube-traveler/269540

Professional
21-Jul-2016, 15:58
WOW, i just started this thread in the beginning of this year and didn't follow, now i see pages already, and i can't decide on which.

Well, my plan will change later, if i will sell my current LF and buy something else then i may change my choices.

All what i need with a bag is to carry the LF body itself, 3 lenses at least, few holders, a loupe, a cable release, a dark cloth, and maybe the films itself, not sure i will carry the light meter but no harm for a spare room for more accessories, i forgot the filters too.

From above stuff i think the big space will be for the body itself, then followed by the film boxes and the film holders, once i can manage to accommodate those first then the rest can be managed later, i don't want to buy a big that is too big and space and i end up using about 50-80% of it at most, and i don't think i will put more things even if my gear is expanding, i will keep down for less stuff and no need to carry all LF gear at once.

Ari
21-Jul-2016, 18:47
I used to have a Technikardan 45s, five lenses (big f4,5 lenses, not small f9s) and 10 Toyo 4x5 holders; there was also a loupe, several cable releases, and other miscellany.
All of it fit very nicely in a Pelican 1510 with the divider set. I also bought the lid divider set, which increased the holding capacity.
I still have the case, but not the camera or lenses any more.
The 1510 is great for walking around town with, as long as you replace the wheels on it, which is explained here: http://www.davidfearn.com/blog/2013/2/peli-case-1510-wheel-mod

mangabdul02
22-Jul-2016, 00:24
I can easily fit my Deardorff 8x10 in its Photobackpacker case at the bottom of the pack with room for four lenses towards the top.
http://hautavis.net/146/o.png

Drew Bedo
22-Jul-2016, 05:20
Hi all,

I would like to know what recommendations or options there for a bag that can accommodate a body of LF [say up to 8x10 but for now it is 4x5] with up to 4 lenses and few film holders and another accessories such as a light meter and shutter release and maybe few film sheets boxes?
.

Ok, so now back to the beginning:

You say 4x5 to start, but want to be able to grow into an 8x10 outfit of gear. Lots of good comments here already. Maybe you should think about one bag for 4x5 and figure on getting another bag for 8x10 later . . .using the guidance gound in this thread.

I have a Zone V 4x5 , several lenses and the other stuff packed into a vintage LowePro "Magnum-35" shoulder bag. It was inexpensive to buy and is welldesigned and over built. The same kit can also pack nicely into a vintage LowePro backpack (a" Super Trekker -II AW" I think). But my back and hips pretty much limite its use for me lately.

There is no perfict bag, and your needs will change with time.

That backpack will also accept a Eastman View No. 2D with a lens mounted and a few film holders, but as I said, I don't really use it that way.

Professional
29-Jul-2016, 21:57
I respect Lowepro, i already have some bags from them for my digital gear, and for my MF film gear i have from another brand a big hard case one, but for one LF body and few accessories with it i may go with a non hard case smaller one but enough room, and i agree that i should focus for 4x5 only as i don't know when i can get 8x10 and maybe i will never get it, later if i can afford 8x10 then i can afford a bag for it too.

Thanks for all recommendations or suggestions there, i will think about it and i appreciate it from you all.

Drew Bedo
30-Jul-2016, 05:32
Good strategy: 4x5 before 8x10.

However a major point to consider is that being able to "afford"to buy an 8x10 camera is relatively easy. It is a one time expense that can be saved up for. The real affordability issue is being able tobuy rgw film use it with. The film alone is four times more costly than 4x5. The analogy might be moving from a small little family car to a large SUV. Even if you get a significant deal on the S?UV, the fuel cost will kill you.

I like both 8x`0 photography and SUVs. I have one but not the other, and have not bought 5x10 film for several years.

JerryP
30-Jul-2016, 12:14
F64 BPX backpack. $209 @ B&H. The only backpack I've seen, except for the PhotoBackpacker, that can handle a 4x5 outfit like mine, (Crown Graphic, 3 lenses and a bunch of other stuff) as well as an 8x10 kit. Plus, you get 2 really cool side pockets that are sized for 5 or 6 4x5 film holders. I see Clyde Butcher and others in their videos using the F64 pack, and it definitely works for me.

JerryP
30-Jul-2016, 19:27
F64 BPX backpack. $209 @ B&H. The only backpack I've seen, except for the PhotoBackpacker, that can handle a 4x5 outfit like mine, (Crown Graphic, 3 lenses and a bunch of other stuff) as well as an 8x10 kit. Plus, you get 2 really cool side pockets that are sized for 5 or 6 4x5 film holders. I see Clyde Butcher and others in their videos using the F64 pack, and it definitely works for me.

I meant to say one of the few backpacks that can comfortably handle both sizes.

Rael
3-Aug-2016, 11:37
A somewhat related question, if I may. When I went to 5x7 from 4x5, I quickly realized I could no longer store film holders in my cargo pants pockets. Can anyone recommend a bag that can hold a decent amount of 5x7 film holders, *without* the camera inside? I'm looking for a shoulder bag, most likely. Just something to let me carry the camera on the tripod, the darkcloth over my shoulder and a bag full of film holders.

agregov
3-Aug-2016, 14:04
I've just moved up to 8x10 and have started researching pack options. I already own the Photobackpacker P2. It is a good pack, comfortable. Really glad Bruce made them. I even customized another pack with a custom backer board and cases. In the end, I think a bag/pack with standard velcro type dividers that you can reconfigure to your camera system is the way to go. If you change your equipment, you want your bag to reform around it. With Photobackpacker, you have to buy new cases--kind of a drag, especially given Bruce has shut down production.

In terms of weight, the best options I've seen in my research is the FirstLight pack line. The 40L should fit most field/folder 8x10s.

http://www.mindshiftgear.com/products/firstlight-40l

I weighed my P2 (with it's camera and lens cases empty) and it was around 6lbs--about the same as the FirstLight. I have seen several of the F-Stop bags up close. And they are quite well built and designed. But (personally) I'm not a fan of the "opening-in-the-back" of the pack to get to your gear. I like having full access to all my equipment in one big open compartment, similar to the P2 and F64. Also notable, the F-Stops are very expensive after you configure the pack with your ICU selections (over $500 for a pack for 8x10). FirstLight is owned by ThinkTank and has similar quality in workmanship.

Here's an extensive video review of the Firstlight pack FYI. Note, I haven't purchased this yet but it's top of my list--just sharing given the thread.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QVcAmIs6pAs

valdormar
11-Aug-2016, 01:32
I roll around in town and take mostly portraits, so the Pelican 1650 case with wheels and a nice pull handle fits my needs.

Deardorff 8x10 kit in a Pelican 1650 with Pick n Pluck Foam.

Deardorff 8x10 "hidden under the camera is the 4x loupe and flash sync cords".
KODAK COMMERCIAL EKTAR LENS 14" mounted on 6x6 wood lens board.
Rodenstock Apo Sironar-N 240mm MC" mounted on 6x6 wood lens board.
4 8x10 film holders " = 8 frames"
2 Shutter release cables.
1 metal 6x6 lens board.
1 Large tripod plate.
http://www.hauslendale.com/Pelican/Pelican1650.jpg