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Greg
14-Jan-2016, 17:45
Learned the Zone system, via Minor White's teachings, with an 8x10 back in the late 1970s. Camera was a B&J flatbed view, 12" Velostigmat Series II F/4.5, and a B&J wooden tripod. Hiked up many a stream/gorge south of the Rochester NY area during all seasons with all photo equipment in a primitive solid framed backpack... fueled by a hearty steak & eggs breakfast. More than once fell through ice in the winter. Super-XX processed in FG-7 with a 9% sodium sulfite solution and printed on Dupont Verlour paper.

Sold the 8x10 camera for an 11x14" B&J wooden flatbed view. Also acquires a 20" 508mm f/7 Caltar. Whole system just proved to be just too much to handle and carry at the time to hike in the New England forests so sold everything in Shutterbug back when.

Then bought and used an Improved Eastman 11x14" view camera. Jewel of a camera.... so ultra light and so compact, but consequently very un-rigid. Many exposures ruined because of movement. It was like a sail in the wind. Sold it.

2 years ago purchased a Chamonix 11x14" view camera. Back around 2000, digital was growing exponentially and prices of view camera lenses exponentially dropping. Fortunately back then purchased quite a few optics at ridiculously low prices and kept them.

Wanted to finally put together my "ideal" 11x14" system... almost there. I needed a case for my 11x14 Chamonix with 3+ lenses and holders. Cost of a new Pelican case was way up there,so I bought an older (probably from the late 1960s) Sinar case made for their 8x10 Norma, gutted it out and padded it with glued cut sections of anti-fatigue dense foam flooring that I bought for very little money at LOWES. Nice thing was that the right bottom side of the Sinar case had a built in section to slide down into lenses on Sinar boards and by coincidence the 11x14 Chamonix uses Sinar like boards. Case is quite beat up on its exterior which makes it look a lot less valuable (and intern its possible contents) than a bright new Pelican case. Strictly to be carried in the trunk of my medium sized SUV. Being 69 years old, backpacking the 11x14 system no longer feasible.

The Charmonix 11x14... a superb camera in every way. Would to compare it side by side to an original Phillips 11x14.

Lenses... my experiences

Went through quite a few Eskofot Ultragon Lenses. None covered as claimed.

90mm f/ Berthiot Paris Perigraphe. Recent purchase. Produces a beautiful circular image on 11x14 film with 1" black borders on the 11 inch dimension. Now am in the process of constructing a really recessed lens board for this optic.

5.9" f/ RD Gray Extreme Angle Periscope lens mounted in a Copal shutter by S K Grimes. Wonderful optic that fully covers 11x14. Have to stop it down all the way. 150 year old optic. Corner sharpness definitely has its limitations, but am willing to put up with its vintage image look. Had to fabricate a base plate to move the lens back to enable infinity focus.

183 f/18 B&L Protar. Covers only but only "absolutely directly on center". Hard for me to focus.

180mm f/12.5 Schneider Dasykar. Pre-Angulon. Just unearthed it after maybe 20 years of it being lost in storage. Does cover 11x14. This spring have to compare it to the 183mm Protar.

250mm f/6.7 Fuji. Close to covering 11x14 but not in the corners by about 1/2 an inch. Now use it on my Full Plate Chamonix. FYI It is the version that has info engraved inside on the retaining ring for the front element.

250mm f/5.6 Fuji SF (Soft Focus) lens. This one was a really surprise to me. I used it on my Whole Plate camera but by chance mounted it onto the 11x14 and saw that it actually covered the format. Bokeh is unique wide open. Stop it down to f/90 and absolutely great for contact prints.

305mm Kowa f/9 . First time I used it found out it did not cover 11x14. Later took its lens hood off and found out that it actually did cover 11x14... the lens hood was vignetting the corners. Sold it whe acquired the 305mm G-Claron.

305mm f/9 G-Claron just covers when stopped down and is amazingly sharp.

12 3/4 (plus 18 7/8, and 27") Protar. Classic optic. Still mastering using the single cells alone. But from what I've read, you need to use a red or orange filter when using the single cells alone. With no cell separation, will never part with this optic.

355mm G-Claron f/9. Just an amazingly sharp optic.

14" f/6.8 Goertz Double Anastigmat. Dagor image Bokeh. Allows for extreme movements. Don't know if it really differs from a Dagor.

508mm f/7 Caltar. Was my only lens with my wooden B&J view. Sold it with the B&J many years ago. After purchasing the Chamonix, realized I wanted another copy of this optic. Took me 2 years to find one on EBay and although was willing to pay a premium for the lens, fortunately got it at the first bid price. It's my main lens to use... wide max aperture makes it just a pleasure to focus and compose with. I honestly think it is the very best optic for the 11x14" format. I believe Rodenstock was the maker of this lens.

600mm f/9.5 Portrait Group 14x17 to 16x20. This optic I had S K Grimes mount into a Copal shutter. When stopped down is amazingly sharp. Initially I thought I wanted it for its vintage image Bokeh, but it turned out to be just an excellent lens to use.

Tripod is the large Ries J100 with their J250-2 head. Had to swallow couple of times when I ordered the combo, but on using it was worth every $$$. People at Ries are also most pleasant to deal with.

Final prints have been mostly on silver paper up to now, with some Salted prints last year. This spring will be scanning negs and making Digital negs to print on Platinum/Palladium paper.

Please feel free to add comments and info on other lenses...

Greg

Jim Fitzgerald
14-Jan-2016, 18:35
Nice set up. With 11 x 14 negatives why not just contact print them? Get it right with the exposure and eliminate the scanning. Just my .02.

I find that with my 11 x 14 set up which is my hand built copy of my old Zone VI 4 x 5, I just up scaled everything, it gives me what I need with the lenses I've collected over the years.

My 360mm Gerogon, custom 18" Voigtlander pre Euryscope, by custom I mean that when I got the lens it was missing the front element so I found a great substitute, an Ilex 21 1/4" process lens that is wonderfully sharp a 15" Spencer-Portland that does everything I need and is so sharp stopped down, a Suter Basile 16 x 13 and a couple of others.

The carbon transfer contact prints are something to see. No scanning just slap it down and print it. I'm simple.

Thom Bennett
15-Jan-2016, 16:14
Acquired an 11x14 Century from a former boss when he closed his studio down. Had to replace the bellows and get it cleaned up but once that was done it was a great camera to use for the short time I did use it. As soon as I started printing the negs I realized that the boxiness of the format was too just close to 8x10 for me (although significantly larger) so I sold it and acquired a 7x17. Love how the panorama complements the 8x10 format. On the 11x14 I used a Nikkor 450 Q. I was recently going through some prints to find one to give to a friend for her birthday and I wish I could have kept it and the 7x17. Didn't win the lottery so...

Jim Fitzgerald
15-Jan-2016, 18:03
I've been blessed with the ability to build cameras. So when it came time to get into 11 x 14 I built the camera. I find myself using it more and more now. I like that it is smaller and lighter than either of my 14 x 17's that I built. I must say that I do like the "presence" of 14 x 17 contact prints though.

John Layton
16-Jan-2016, 07:51
Built my first 11x14 about thirty years ago. Four nested, telescoping boxes sealed with felt - movements on back with short bellows...so weighed a ton, especially when mounted on my Quick-Set Gibralter tripod, which could likely double as a building jack! In combo with a very decent, barrel-mounted 19" EK Anastigmat, Tri-X souped in ABC pyro (which I learned from Cole Weston, using Edward's contact frame and dodging tools!)

But I needed something lighter - so built a folding flatbed out of plywood, picked up a used bellows, and upgraded to a 14" Kern Blue-Dot Trigor. I cannot say enough about that lens! I tested this lens by taping strips of 35mm Agfapan 25asa into the corners and center of a holder - and the results looked almost identical, even when enlarged, to using this film in a Leica M with a 50mm Mandler-designed summicron! Amazing! Had previously tried a 14" Kern Dagor - but found the field to be curved. The trigor was nice and flat, and offered better coverage. Note the this Trigor is rated at F/11, but opens to an unmarked F/8 - which makes focussing quite easy.

Much later, for various reasons I sold the Trigor and replace this with a 305 G-Claron. Wonderful, versatile lens for all formats from 4x5 to 11x14 - very sharp, etc. But I still miss the Trigor and wish I hadn't sold it!

A bit later still, I modified the 11x14 by extracting the front standard, back, and bellows, and mounting this on a single wooden rail - which cut out lots of weight but made it a bit flimsy and very difficult to adjust.

Presently, the camera sits unused...with three pristine Fidelity holders, and about 50 sheets of outdated Tri-X. I really prefer making enlargements these days, and with the value of those holders I sometimes think I should sell them. Then again...maybe not!

An interesting note about the film - at about twenty five years out of date, its level of base fog makes it basically perfect for certain subjects!

Michael Kadillak
16-Jan-2016, 11:33
An interesting note about the film - at about twenty five years out of date, its level of base fog makes it basically perfect for certain subjects!

Found out the same thing relative to some old TMY in 12x20 and 8x20 I have in the freezer. It is like a pre-exposure and you never have to worry about some texture in the skies.

Max Hao
19-Jan-2016, 00:39
I also purchased a Charmonix 11x14, very nicely made and pleasant to use. When it comes to finding good lenses for the format, it took me a while now but I still need a lense long enough. The longest I have is a 19' Artar, but I haven't mounted it to a shutter yet, just used for long exposure. I have a Kowa 240, and it covers 11x14. I do carbon prints with 11x14 exclusively.

papercam
19-Jan-2016, 04:19
A couple of Centurys.

Michael Kadillak
19-Jan-2016, 07:28
I also purchased a Charmonix 11x14, very nicely made and pleasant to use. When it comes to finding good lenses for the format, it took me a while now but I still need a lense long enough. The longest I have is a 19' Artar, but I haven't mounted it to a shutter yet, just used for long exposure. I have a Kowa 240, and it covers 11x14. I do carbon prints with 11x14 exclusively.

Two lenses that seem to be my go to on 11x14 are the 355 G Claron and the Fuji 600C. 24" Artars are more available and less costly and work well as do the 610mm Apo Nikkors that can be found at reasonable prices in barrel. The 30" and 35" Artars also are nice to use as from a visual perspective they are not as "long" as you would think on the GG. A large face tripod plate is a requirement when you are drawing out these bellows and inserting holders. The view under the dark cloth puts a smile on my face each and every time. Just saying.....

Jim Galli
19-Jan-2016, 19:43
11X14 "kit" includes Deardorff V11, the ubiquitous Nikkor 450M, modern, multi-coated, a 270mm Computar f9, a 355mm Dagor type Schnieder Symmar, and then some softer imaging things also. Some of the extreme wide angle anastigmats, the cheap, no name you recognize ones from the 1910's, if you poke the aperture out of them so they are unchoked, are quite lovely as wide angle soft focus. They have all the characters of a good soft focus lens, sharp inner core with a nice cloud of coma. I have 8X10, 11X14, and 14X17 like this. The 8X10 is the usual for that era 183mm length and it just covers. If curious, there's some things on my pages done down around Mojave Ca. with these lenses. For sharp wide angle I have the 200mm Cooke VIIb and a 9 1/4" Dallmeyer f6.5 WA I've yet to play with. I use the same Ries combination the OP mentions.

The Deardorff is 1966-ish and came with 5 lovely matching 11X14 Burke and James holders of the same era. I've added a couple of plastic 'medical' ones as well. The 'dorff weighs exactly double what the V8 weighs because everything is exactly twice as big. I had a Wisner 14X17 for a time and it weighed the same as the Deardorff. I love using the Deardorff. It just feels good in your hands. We had a big discussion over at apug about bigger camera working slower. This is the size where I really slow down. You can't be in a hurry with the big 11X14. I can throw the 2D 810 up and have a picture done in 3 - 4 minutes. Not so the Deardorff V11. When it's out, I sort of luxuriate in the process. Level the tripod head perfectly before setting the machine on top. It's a process.

My downfall is it only comes out once a year or so. The contact prints are glorious. Just typing this has me longing. Gonna take the back seat out of the woodie and do a proper road trip this spring. Hopefully. Maybe I'll drive over to Ely and do the Nevada Northern in 1114.

Michael Kadillak
22-Jan-2016, 16:39
You are reminding me that I need to get out in the field with my 11x14 as soon as possible.


11X14 "kit" includes Deardorff V11, the ubiquitous Nikkor 450M, modern, multi-coated, a 270mm Computar f9, a 355mm Dagor type Schnieder Symmar, and then some softer imaging things also. Some of the extreme wide angle anastigmats, the cheap, no name you recognize ones from the 1910's, if you poke the aperture out of them so they are unchoked, are quite lovely as wide angle soft focus. They have all the characters of a good soft focus lens, sharp inner core with a nice cloud of coma. I have 8X10, 11X14, and 14X17 like this. The 8X10 is the usual for that era 183mm length and it just covers. If curious, there's some things on my pages done down around Mojave Ca. with these lenses. For sharp wide angle I have the 200mm Cooke VIIb and a 9 1/4" Dallmeyer f6.5 WA I've yet to play with. I use the same Ries combination the OP mentions.

The Deardorff is 1966-ish and came with 5 lovely matching 11X14 Burke and James holders of the same era. I've added a couple of plastic 'medical' ones as well. The 'dorff weighs exactly double what the V8 weighs because everything is exactly twice as big. I had a Wisner 14X17 for a time and it weighed the same as the Deardorff. I love using the Deardorff. It just feels good in your hands. We had a big discussion over at apug about bigger camera working slower. This is the size where I really slow down. You can't be in a hurry with the big 11X14. I can throw the 2D 810 up and have a picture done in 3 - 4 minutes. Not so the Deardorff V11. When it's out, I sort of luxuriate in the process. Level the tripod head perfectly before setting the machine on top. It's a process.

My downfall is it only comes out once a year or so. The contact prints are glorious. Just typing this has me longing. Gonna take the back seat out of the woodie and do a proper road trip this spring. Hopefully. Maybe I'll drive over to Ely and do the Nevada Northern in 1114.

MAubrey
22-Jan-2016, 17:15
I'm looking forward to being able to contribute to this thread as soon as I've had a few 11x14 experiences. Need to finish building though...

David Lobato
22-Jan-2016, 19:42
I bought an Empire State Number 1 with two film holders a few years ago. A couple of years later I added 2 more 11x14 film holders. The lenses are a 360mm Fujinon W, a 760mm Apo-Nikkor in barrel, and a recently acquired 19 inch Red Dot Artar. The RD Artar was intended for 8x10 but this week I happened to mount it on a lens board for the 11X14 in just a few easy minutes. That conveniently filled the gap between the other two lenses and I am anxious to try it out.

No surprise 11x14 film is expensive. My thought on the cost of using the 11x14 is "You gotta be careful where you point that thing!" I have shot several sheets with good results. One ongoing problem is the film won't stay put inside the film holder and has slid out of the holder after I pulled the dark slide. The very first sheet did that, it slid completely out and into the bellows. It was embarrassing in front of my portrait subjects to retrieve the sheet of film from inside the camera. For the flip side of that holder the film only slipped an inch and the portrait was a success besides that glitch. Later, I put small pieces of double sticky cellophane tape on the film holder's septum to hold the sheet film in place. It makes removing an exposed sheet of film difficult though. I would appreciate hearing of other solutions to that problem.

Setting up the camera takes time. This is one other benefit, it's nice to see the lovely image on the big 11x14 ground glass. The Empire State is lighter than my 8x10 Deardorff, but the extra bulk makes it harder to portage more than several yards away.

I examined my first few developed sheets in awe. All that work was worth it. Now I'm motivated to take the camera out in the coming weeks.

Len Middleton
23-Jan-2016, 08:16
No surprise 11x14 film is expensive. My thought on the cost of using the 11x14 is "You gotta be careful where you point that thing!" I have shot several sheets with good results. One ongoing problem is the film won't stay put inside the film holder and has slid out of the holder after I pulled the dark slide. The very first sheet did that, it slid completely out and into the bellows. It was embarrassing in front of my portrait subjects to retrieve the sheet of film from inside the camera. For the flip side of that holder the film only slipped an inch and the portrait was a success besides that glitch. Later, I put small pieces of double sticky cellophane tape on the film holder's septum to hold the sheet film in place. It makes removing an exposed sheet of film difficult though. I would appreciate hearing of other solutions to that problem.


David,

There are a number of threads about using "3M 928 "repositionable" ATG tape" in filmholders to address your issue.

I purchased a roll of the tape for myself and use it successfully with my 8x20 holders. However bear in mind for me, as it is a panoramic format, gravity is tugging on the 8" dimension rather than the 20". dimension. Still a number of other people have tried it.

Good luck and hope that works for you as well,

Len

Jim Fitzgerald
23-Jan-2016, 08:24
Len, I use that tape for my 8 x 20 as well. I've never needed it for either my 11 x 14 or 14 x 17.

Len Middleton
23-Jan-2016, 08:28
Len, I use that tape for my 8 x 20 as well. I've never needed it for either my 11 x 14 or 14 x 17.

Jim,

That is interesting given the large distance supported only by the edges.

I presume it is not a situation of film thickness / stiffness (x-ray versus photo), film holder type / style, or camera position (level versus pointing down)?

Just curious...

Thanks for your insights,

Len

John Layton
24-Jan-2016, 09:51
Hmmm...never had the problem of film sliding out of holders for 11x14. Tri-x in Fidelity holders - some down angled shots although never quite straight down. But as the above example regarded doing portraits...perhaps an assumed vertical orientation would provide less relative holder support - even non existent support across the top of the film, given a tendency to slide downwards away from the film-gate end?

I've never used tape inside any of my holders...and would have some concern about marks on the film base from this.

At any rate, I just received a query about the possibility of my selling my 11x14 holders - but this discussion is getting me excited about this format again, so I think I'll hold off on selling these for now!

Interesting footnote: my earlier 11x14 experience coincided with some beta-testing I was doing for Paul Krot (inventor of Sprint chemistry and teaching at RISD), using his Sprint version of Pyro. When I used a (not recommended) full strength stop bath in line with this - the films actually luminesced (glowed in the dark!) very briefly upon being slid into this stop. But with color of this luminescence being very similar to that of a faint green filter, I'd guessed that the film was safe from this "self exposure."

Sorry that Paul K. had to leave us too early. He was quite brilliant in his field - and always great about sharing information.

blindpig
24-Jan-2016, 10:19
It seems along time ago(maybe 35 years or more)I worked in Western Auto Supply Co.'s photography department and often was called upon to use an 11X14 Deardorff At times only with an 8X10 back but it was always a fun and kind of awesome experience.In the last couple of years dabbleing in alternative photo techniques(mostly shooting in camera paper negatives and now carbon printing),decided I needed an 11X14 camera sooo built one.It's a sliding box design with limited front and back tilts,using a 21" process lens.
Since I'm creeping up on 80 years decided to attach this some what large and cumbersome object to a wheeled contraption which doubles as a camera stand allowing it and me to"get around"LOL!.
If interested you can check out the unit and it's construction on the"f295" forum,"Lens Based Camera Making and Modifying" section,"on the verge camera build" thread.
It's been a blast to build and use and intend to put some "miles" on it this year...
Cheers, Don

Michael Kadillak
24-Jan-2016, 12:49
I have shot my V11 nearly straight down and never once gave the issue of film slipping out of my holders a second thought nor have I ever experienced it. I would think that in order for this to happen the slide would have to adhere to the film in some way and pull it out with it. Don't see how that could happen but you do what you gotta do.



Hmmm...never had the problem of film sliding out of holders for 11x14. Tri-x in Fidelity holders - some down angled shots although never quite straight down. But as the above example regarded doing portraits...perhaps an assumed vertical orientation would provide less relative holder support - even non existent support across the top of the film, given a tendency to slide downwards away from the film-gate end?

I've never used tape inside any of my holders...and would have some concern about marks on the film base from this.

At any rate, I just received a query about the possibility of my selling my 11x14 holders - but this discussion is getting me excited about this format again, so I think I'll hold off on selling these for now!

Interesting footnote: my earlier 11x14 experience coincided with some beta-testing I was doing for Paul Krot (inventor of Sprint chemistry and teaching at RISD), using his Sprint version of Pyro. When I used a (not recommended) full strength stop bath in line with this - the films actually luminesced (glowed in the dark!) very briefly upon being slid into this stop. But with color of this luminescence being very similar to that of a faint green filter, I'd guessed that the film was safe from this "self exposure."

Sorry that Paul K. had to leave us too early. He was quite brilliant in his field - and always great about sharing information.

angusparker
1-Feb-2016, 10:06
Got the larger 14x17 Chamonix brother to your 11x14. It's a beast, barely manageable for one person, better with two. Still the negatives speak for themselves. Now the weather is clearing in San Francisco, I've got to get it out while we still have some billowy clouds and not too much wind. As for lenses, here is my two cents on ones that cover 14x17 and will give you insane amounts of rise and fall with your camera! http://www.angusparkerphoto.com/blog/2015/2/ulf-lens-recommendations-14x17

PS. It's great to see so many old lenses being remounted in shutter by Grimes - a wonderful way to bring them back to life.

Michael Kadillak
1-Feb-2016, 10:37
Got the larger 14x17 Chamonix brother to your 11x14. It's a beast, barely manageable for one person, better with two. Still the negatives speak for themselves. Now the weather is clearing in San Francisco, I've got to get it out while we still have some billowy clouds and not too much wind. As for lenses, here is my two cents on ones that cover 14x17 and will give you insane amounts of rise and fall with your camera! http://www.angusparkerphoto.com/blog/2015/2/ulf-lens-recommendations-14x17

PS. It's great to see so many old lenses being remounted in shutter by Grimes - a wonderful way to bring them back to life.

Good Gawd. Another person afflicted with the condition commonly referred to as Excessively Large Camera Syndrome (ELCS) and all of the periphery of devices that are connected to this condition. Complete agreement with your three go to lens in the 355 G Claron, the 450M Nikon and the 600C Fuji. For my 11x14 V11 I added the Doctor 760 APO Germinal in Copal 3, the 35" Red Dot aluminum barrel in #5 Ilex and sometimes reach for the 21" Ektanon on barrel. I will also convey that once I happened upon a Majestic tripod with the large 6" base plate that has this amazing capability of being able to hoist that camera upward for optimal image making perspective, my Reis A100 is a lonely boy in its case absent this amazing capability. The lightweight aluminum ladder now is is also close at hand just in case. The ability to change the viewing perspective in the vertical horizon can be a real game changer IMHO.

Pali K
1-Feb-2016, 10:44
Angus thanks for your article on ulf lenses. I read it before going with a 450 Nikkor for my diy 11x14 which will be upgraded to 14x17 soon. Really hoping my addiction for massive negatives stops at 14x17.

Pali

angusparker
1-Feb-2016, 22:17
Angus thanks for your article on ulf lenses. I read it before going with a 450 Nikkor for my diy 11x14 which will be upgraded to 14x17 soon. Really hoping my addiction for massive negatives stops at 14x17.

Pali

It will pass - 14x17 is as big as you need to go. You can even split the plate and get a pano 7x17!

Jim Fitzgerald
1-Feb-2016, 22:31
Or build an 8 x 20 and 14 x 17 like I did! Finishing up my 3rd 14 x 17 now for a friend. Will have a separate build thread soon.....I hope

Duolab123
12-Feb-2016, 21:18
I have a Folmer & Schwing, commercial camera, I bought it almost 30 years back along with 8 or 9 holders. Wood is immaculate, bellows are intact 99 year old bellows. Havery a Turner & Reich, very old Wollensak shutter thats in pieces. I haven't used for years I recently picked up a 14 inch Ilex Caltar with the enormous #5 shutter. I'm going to start this week with just some test shots inside. Maybe I will take some pictures of other old stuff. This camera folds up nicely, it has two extension rails, bellows can extend at least 5 feet.
Everytime I think my V8 Deardorff is to big to carry I just set it next to this.
Then I grab a Crown Graphic and go shoot hand held. ��
The results are stunning but man is this stuff a lot of work!

Randy Moe
13-Feb-2016, 04:44
I would like to see pics of that camera. A few of us have 11x14 Studio Deardorff with the huge stand. 75" of extension. I have posted in 'Show off your LF cam' thread and pictures of Deardoff abound.

But yours is rarely seen.

jnanian
13-Feb-2016, 12:07
hi greg

i have a century 8a on a semi centennial stand, it came with a carriage 8x10 back that i never really used
IDK 10 years ago i found a 7x11 back ( here on this forum ) with a handful of film holders that i began using it.
i made and use a 11x14 back and paper holder for it too. i don't use it as much as i used to, it is mostly used for
portrait making ( with both backs ). long exposed paper negatives. i use it with a wollensak 1a triple convertible.
i looked for years for a 11x14 film holder and eventually found a whole empire state camera, with 11x14 and 8x10 backs together
with a gaggle of film holders. it was bought a year ago and i have never bothered to see if it fit the century, im not sure if it does
and at this point it really doesn't matter seeing i can just take the empire state on the road if i have to.
i don't bother with film, or xray or lith film, it seems paper does the same thing, so i just use what i have lying around .. and if i need color i will just add it myself.
i have't coated anything bigger than 8x10, but i'll be hand coating bigger sizes of paper and metal with either bottled or hand made silver gelatin emulsion.
i'd say glass plates, but i don't have any plate holders bigger than 8x10 .. the empire state uses a brass lens bought for not too much $$ from a forum member, and a tin tea cup for a shutter.

Vaughn
13-Feb-2016, 14:57
My experiences? Well right now I need to develop the film that has been sitting in holders longer than it is good for the latent images, so that I can head out into the desert and expose some more next week.

Duolab123
13-Feb-2016, 20:32
I would like to see pics of that camera. A few of us have 11x14 Studio Deardorff with the huge stand. 75" of extension. I have posted in 'Show off your LF cam' thread and pictures of Deardoff abound.

But yours is rarely seen.

146547

Duolab123
13-Feb-2016, 20:35
146547

Randy , I'm not very swift with attaching photos here's one from my phone . I will get a couple better photos and post later
Best Mike

Randy Moe
14-Feb-2016, 04:27
I look forward to more!

Henry Ambrose
14-Feb-2016, 09:56
Couple of quick questions on 11x14:

I think there are 2 standards for film holders - one for X-ray and the other photographic - right?

Is HP5 readily available in 11x14?

Thanks.

Will Whitaker
14-Feb-2016, 11:39
I don't intend to upstage Duolab123. Just more meat for the thread. This is a Folmer & Schwing 11x14 camera that I've had for about 8 years. It came with only an 8x10 back and was advertised as an 8x10 camera. But it's clearly intended for 11x14 as the rear standard opening is right at 16 inches square. Four sections of bed. The bellows extends to 52 inches.
I still have designs on it for someday...

146558

146559

146560

Randy Moe
14-Feb-2016, 11:44
Can't answer on holders. I think there is no standard for T.

11x14 HP5 is in stock usually at Freestyle, Adorama and B$H.


Couple of quick questions on 11x14:

I think there are 2 standards for film holders - one for X-ray and the other photographic - right?

Is HP5 readily available in 11x14?

Thanks.

Greg
14-Feb-2016, 11:55
Couple of quick questions on 11x14:

I think there are 2 standards for film holders - one for X-ray and the other photographic - right?

Is HP5 readily available in 11x14?

Thanks.

Fidelity actually made only one 11x14 standard for film use. When it was used for X-rays, they added plastic extensions on each side of the film holder using 4 screws and labeled the the holder Fidelity MEDICAL CASSETTE. Take the 4 screws on each side out and remove the 2 extensions and back again to the photographic film holder.

B&H stocks 11x14 Ilford HP5 film. 25 sheets for $199.95. 8 bucks a pop sounds like a lot of money but actually less than 2 rolls of 120 film...

Duolab123
14-Feb-2016, 17:28
I don't intend to upstage Duolab123. Just more meat for the thread. This is a Folmer & Schwing 11x14 camera that I've had for about 8 years. It came with only an 8x10 back and was advertised as an 8x10 camera. But it's clearly intended for 11x14 as the rear standard opening is right at 16 inches square. Four sections of bed. The bellows extends to 52 inches.
I still have designs on it for someday...

146558

146559

146560

This is almost identical to mine, I think the only difference is mine has brass knobs instead of the wood one on your camera. And mine has a 11x14 back. I counted today and I have 8 double film holders.

According to this site these were made from 1915 to 1929 mine says Folmer and Schwing Division of Eastman Kodak Co.

http://www.piercevaubel.com/cam/ekc/fscom.htm

Nice camera!

plaubel
15-Feb-2016, 01:26
After entering into LF with 13x18cm/5x7", it was immediately clear to me that I want to use bigger formats, too.
8x10" developed to an expensive system, especially slide film; my Durst 138 Laborators can't pick 8x10" negatives, contact prints are not that big, so no option to me.

My experience after buying a pack of 11x14" paper has been, that 11x14" is a bit tiny to as for a big size.
I only love to print from 30x40cm (12x16") up to bigger prints.

So I had to look for a 30x40cm camera, but over some years, nothing good came in.
Meanwhile, I first bought a german 24x30cm Reisekamera and played around a bit.

One day I was able to buy an ugly version of a 30x40 cm russian Reisekamera.
Not the camera is ugly, but the bellows; it seems to be crocodile or elephant skin, it is a little bit - hard.
But the bellows does his job, so what?

Surprisingly, some months later a german 30x40cm Reisekamera came in.

No, I am not a collector, so I decided to sell the russian camera, but it shows that I was the one and only who loved to buy her.
Yes, now I am a collector of two big cameras.

Using one for the home and the other for the field seems to be a good idea, but I really don't need two such big cameras...
Now I want to rebuilt something of the russian lady, and maybe I will sell the german version.
Or maybe I will keep both, who knows.

I figured out that the film holders are really heavy, and they may pull down the back standard after focusing and loading the holder.
In my opinion, such big cameras in general need a better static than given by the engineers, so I have to bring some moveable rods to the standards.

Until the holders, the standards, the bellows and other small parts will fit perfect, of course I can use my big cameras, but I am lucky to be able to switch to the smaller formats 13x18cm and 4x5" for the daily photographing.

I prefer to tape my ULF film sheets from two sides onto aluminium plates, which fits into the holder.
No problem with flatness.

I can (probably, haven't done) use a 305mm G-Claron, a 360mm Heliar, a 420mm Dagor, a 480mm and a 520mm Apo Ronar.
Two other lenses may cover, too.

Xray film is available in 30x40cm, and I am really not willing to afford ULF Ilfords.
Maco Ortho 25 is a nice and to me affordable film, too, and some day I will buy a pack.
10 sheets, 90 Euro...

The only thing I really miss, is a longer Verito.
I am looking forward to save some money for such a lens.
Sometimes I have the idea to give up/sell my german Reisekamera, keeping my russian camera and buying a Verito.

For me it seems that a live without a Verito is possible, but it makes no sense.

Ritchie

Randy Moe
15-Feb-2016, 09:06
Love your story.

I am same.

Logic be damned. :)

plaubel
15-Feb-2016, 09:43
The problem is, if there would come in a third one - I probably would take her, too.
Buying a third one and then selling two of them seems to be a good technique for avoiding a collection :-)
But first, I need "my" lens.

Ritchie

jnanian
15-Feb-2016, 12:20
hi ritchie

do you have a 14" verito ?
you can unscrew one of the elements the focal lenth is 24"
(according to wollensak ).

i'm hooked on a noname brass RR sold to me by RR,
and a 1a 3x convertible i bought from igor. with both of them, the OOF areas
are really really nice. and i didn't have to sell a kidney.

good luck !

plaubel
15-Feb-2016, 15:38
Thanks, jnanian,

I have heard about unscrewing the front lens here in the forum and by asking for this in PMs, but unfortunately I don't have any Verito.

There are hundred of beautyful lenses, I know, but with a Verito it seems that I may get lucky.

Ritchie

Duolab123
20-Feb-2016, 23:32
I took a test shot tonight with my 11 x 14, first try with my "new" Ilex 14 inch lens. HP 5 plus, #5 shutter has a top speed of a 1/50 sec. I'm going to need to find some big series neutral density filters, slower film. At f 6.3 it makes for dreamy depth of field. I'm really chomping at the bit to make some portraits.
I developed in a Jobo 2840 tube in straight XTOL, worked fine, used my CPP 2, no streaks erc.
I kinda forgot how big the film is, looks like something from a radiologist, when I opened one of the holders I found it loaded with Super XX, 2 little V notches, made me long for the good old days.
I've got to get some work done with this lovely old gal, but man is it work!
Best Mike

John Layton
23-Feb-2016, 02:07
I learned how to use Pyro from Cole Weston back in the day - and we used Super XX (also used EW's contact frame and dodging tools!). But what a combo - and what a film! And then there was the "old" Agfa Portriga, and the "old" Oriental - which to this day I cannot duplicate and so wish I could (I'd happily ingest more cadmium - thank you!). Yes...those were the days!

Duolab123
23-Feb-2016, 17:59
I learned how to use Pyro from Cole Weston back in the day - and we used Super XX (also used EW's contact frame and dodging tools!). But what a combo - and what a film! And then there was the "old" Agfa Portriga, and the "old" Oriental - which to this day I cannot duplicate and so wish I could (I'd happily ingest more cadmium - thank you!). Yes...those were the days!

If we can put Mercury in 400 Billion light bulbs we should be able to put Cadmium in Portriga and Ektalure. When the super volcano EMP asteroid tsunami earthquake terrorist extraterrestrial shark hits, who's gonna care about a little Cadmium??

Peace, Mike

james zhou
8-Mar-2016, 21:46
148029148030Just put together a 11x14 using Arca Swiss front (141), rails and a metal back removed from a Frica 11x14 camera (a little known new all metal camera company located near Hangzhou, China). When trying the lenses I have I am surprised to find out that 150 Xl actually covers this format at infinity focus when stopped down to f32. The whole thing is very solid. Will do a test shoot soon.

plaubel
8-Mar-2016, 23:13
James, your standard movement and rail technique look very special; is it hard to find the zero position of the back?

Ritchie

james zhou
9-Mar-2016, 02:47
Hi Ritchie, once the standard is centered and locked down, it is not a problem. The whole thing disassembles and remounts easily, without disrupting the previous settings. The set up allows using very long lenses as well.

I plan to replace the second ball head with something else soon, making tilting easier.

Best! James

Randy Moe
9-Mar-2016, 06:39
148029148030Just put together a 11x14 using Arca Swiss front (141), rails and a metal back removed from a Frica 11x14 camera (a little known new all metal camera company located near Hangzhou, China). When trying the lenses I have I am surprised to find out that 150 Xl actually covers this format at infinity focus when stopped down to f32. The whole thing is very solid. Will do a test shoot soon.


Good work. Gave me more ideas. Thx!

plaubel
9-Mar-2016, 08:24
James, that sounds useful, but now I have another question:
For stretching the bellows, do you extend the back/bottom rail?
From here, it looks if stretching with front standard may give some problems with the bellows because contacting the front/top rail?

james zhou
9-Mar-2016, 13:58
Hi Ritchie, all extension was done with the Arca rails. However, an additional vertical support becomes necessary at longer extensions. The elevated ARCA rail does not block the bellows, but act as a bellows support. Its hight could be adjusted for longest extensions (up to 1,000mm). I have also included an earlier set up without the ARCA camera components. See pictures, Best! James.

AlexGard
21-Mar-2016, 22:23
I received my 11x14 Chamonix today. Very impressed with the design and ergonomically it's a hundred times sturdier and nicer to use than my Tachihara 8x10, and surprisingly light for the size. Keeping in mind I'm only an amateur so hope to not sound like I know what I'm talking about!

148668
The 8 inch lens board size gives it a lot of presence. Also the focusing design makkes critical focus is easy.

148669

Perhaps the plate holder I am most impressed with.
The spring back on the camera makes inserting the plate holder an absolute dream... no more worrying about pulling the rear standard out of focus during insertion of the plate holder. This was probably what pleased me the most about playing with the camera this afternoon. Inserting the plate holder into my Tachihara has always given me the shivers as you will never know if you've stuffed up the focus until you develop.
148670

It is modular to take 11x14, 11x11 and 5 1/2 x 14 inch plates. They were kind enough to etch those dimensions into the ground glass, too.

I am now just waiting for my silver bath to arrive and I hope to be out shooting before the end of the week. I have no doubts I'm going to have a lot of fun with this camera.

Cheers

Greg
22-Mar-2016, 06:00
Congratulations on your Chamonix 11x14. Have been using mine for almost 2 years and just love it.

Carrying it around was a problem. I would spread out everything in the back of my mid-sized SUV only to have it bounced around while driving. What I finally did is purchase a very used Sinar case made for the Norma 8x10 system. Gutted out the left side and glued in fitted pieces of garage flooring to protect the camera. Left side of case holds folded camera, WA bellows, and 2 holders. Right side lenses in Sinar boards with the focusing cloth over them. Whole thing a bit heavy to carry long distances but no problem for short walks.

Looks like Chamonix increased the size of the lens board. Mine uses standard Sinar boards.

Enjoy....

AlexGard
23-Mar-2016, 05:23
Yes this camera has an 8 inch lens board. I am not sure if this is a standard feature now but when I asked Hugo for an 8 inch front he said the 11x14 comes with it, so maybe that means it's the new and improved?

This camera will be used for wet plate so won't be going far from the vehicle but I do need to arrange a better box to transport it in.

jnanian
23-Mar-2016, 06:00
Congratulations on your Chamonix 11x14. Have been using mine for almost 2 years and just love it.

Carrying it around was a problem. I would spread out everything in the back of my mid-sized SUV only to have it bounced around while driving. What I finally did is purchase a very used Sinar case made for the Norma 8x10 system. Gutted out the left side and glued in fitted pieces of garage flooring to protect the camera. Left side of case holds folded camera, WA bellows, and 2 holders. Right side lenses in Sinar boards with the focusing cloth over them. Whole thing a bit heavy to carry long distances but no problem for short walks.

Looks like Chamonix increased the size of the lens board. Mine uses standard Sinar boards.

Enjoy....

hi greg

the empire that i have originally came with a large canvas covered cardboard box with a set of leather straps ( tie down the top )
a handle and corner/feet. it was plush lined.
when the camera was mailed to me it arrived in the box but the box was not in good shape ...
i've peeled the canvas off of it, and have made a template ( sort of ) .. when i get the right kind of cardboard
i'll make the cuts, fold it up and cover it with fabric store canvas and doc-dads like tie down and straps.
the problem is the cardboard i have found isn't the same gauge and i'll have to glue 2 thinner sheets together cross grain
( like making ply wood ) to make it more durable. its really not a hard project &c just finding the time/energy to do it is the hard part ...
after i make it i'll post a photo to this thread, it might be an easy solution to the always present problem of storage and transport of
a large folding camera.


good luck !
john

angusparker
23-Mar-2016, 10:11
hi greg

the empire that i have originally came with a large canvas covered cardboard box with a set of leather straps ( tie down the top )
a handle and corner/feet. it was plush lined.
when the camera was mailed to me it arrived in the box but the box was not in good shape ...
i've peeled the canvas off of it, and have made a template ( sort of ) .. when i get the right kind of cardboard
i'll make the cuts, fold it up and cover it with fabric store canvas and doc-dads like tie down and straps.
the problem is the cardboard i have found isn't the same gauge and i'll have to glue 2 thinner sheets together cross grain
( like making ply wood ) to make it more durable. its really not a hard project &c just finding the time/energy to do it is the hard part ...
after i make it i'll post a photo to this thread, it might be an easy solution to the always present problem of storage and transport of
a large folding camera.


good luck !
john

I ordered one of these for my ROC King that is 17x17x4.5 but I know they have bigger ones: http://www.bhphotovideo.com/bnh/controller/home?O=&sku=1126494&gclid=CjwKEAjw_ci3BRDSvfjortr--DQSJADU8f2jwlguFzUW4R3CvfPFjkgQBTg463lZVGBGKAxUcf8odBoC8x_w_wcB&is=REG&ap=y&m=Y&c3api=1876%2C92051677562%2C&A=details&Q=

jnanian
24-Mar-2016, 05:12
that looks really nice!
and more than likely
half the price of the
box I hoped to build ...
the cardboard sheets
are less than $2 each ..
the cloth ( inside and out )
probably costs $20-30 ...
and a big old vat of pva and paste
probably $20... the straps and corners
probably $10-20 ... and then he effort
to cut, glue, paste stitch ... probably excessive for
a cardboard box ... :cool:

thanks for the link !

angusparker
24-Mar-2016, 09:36
that looks really nice!
and more than likely
half the price of the
box I hoped to build ...
the cardboard sheets
are less than $2 each ..
the cloth ( inside and out )
probably costs $20-30 ...
and a big old vat of pva and paste
probably $20... the straps and corners
probably $10-20 ... and then he effort
to cut, glue, paste stitch ... probably excessive for
a cardboard box ... :cool:

thanks for the link !

Welcome!

blindpig
7-May-2016, 08:03
I realize it's been a while since I posted but thought a picture of my 11X14 sliding box camera and stand might add to the earlier post.
http://i820.photobucket.com/albums/zz128/blindpigetc/682dd2d7-ecab-4293-8852-0094b7a36a8e_zps613fee23.jpg (http://s820.photobucket.com/user/blindpigetc/media/682dd2d7-ecab-4293-8852-0094b7a36a8e_zps613fee23.jpg.html)

Randy Moe
7-May-2016, 08:08
I realize it's been a while since I posted but thought a picture of my 11X14 sliding box camera and stand might add to the earlier post.
http://i820.photobucket.com/albums/zz128/blindpigetc/682dd2d7-ecab-4293-8852-0094b7a36a8e_zps613fee23.jpg (http://s820.photobucket.com/user/blindpigetc/media/682dd2d7-ecab-4293-8852-0094b7a36a8e_zps613fee23.jpg.html)

Interesting solution to stand and tilts. I assume the camera rotates on the stand?

blindpig
7-May-2016, 10:07
Actually this is an older picture the stand has been upgraded to 16" wheels as the 10" ones didn't move over rough ground easily.The stand comes apart to fit in my car trunk.To answer your question the camera has tilts both lens and back and the stand's camera base tilts as well however the stand must rotate as the camera doesn't.

jnanian
7-May-2016, 10:53
Welcome!

thnks !
- john

Duolab123
7-May-2016, 17:53
The stand with 16 inch wheels is brilliant.

Taking the logical next step, if I had the money maybe an all terrain vehicle with a Majestic head mounted front and rear with a custom trailer to pull behind my little Subaru. :)

I need something as I have a nice folding 11 X14 and 8 x 10, haven't been outside with either in a couple years.
Lazy, Mike

Jason50
26-Jul-2017, 01:38
Hello, everyone. I'm also going to buy an old 11x14 for wet edition photography. I like this size. I've learned a lot about large format cameras here. Thank you

DrTang
25-Aug-2017, 08:58
wow..can't believe I haven't commented here yet

anyway.. was wanting a 11x14 for a LONG time - ever since I went to a sale at Prof Bloodgood's HQ in town (they were behind the olde tymey photo studio stuff) and saw one..they wanted 200 bucks at the time which I didn't have

fast forward 30 years.. I finally find a studio space in town I can afford.. and almost immedicatly come across an 8x10 /century stand which I start using...if only I had a 11x14!!!.......about a year after getting my studio..I go to a garage sale locally where the ad said 'old cameras'... I drive up and see a big wood hulk of a thing..it's an Empire 11x14, three holders and a conley 12/20/25 lens..how much?? oh..we aren't open yet

- so I wait around until they open and apparently someone else had previously expressed interest and they didn't know what they wanted to ask for it anyway so it turned into an auction with me and two other and I just jumped in at 500 buck and the others walked away..I figured at worst..I could sell off the holders and get back even if the thing was too thrashed...it wasn't and the lens is cool .. I been shooting it at 25" (front element only) - which I have just recently learned I am using wrong.. I was just leaving it on the front..but I am supposed to take it off and put it on the back!!! who knew?

anyway..it's a pisser when you blow a sheet..but when one comes out - OH MAN

I have just recently received a 11x14 Indian Field camera - a Vageeswari - in trade

needs help, came with no back and bad bellows and no tripod plate... getting the tripod plate made (here) and ordered a back and bellows from some guy in Prague
- so I'll have two pretty soon

Vaughn
25-Aug-2017, 09:53
Took my new 11x14 out into the redwoods yesterday -- exposed 4 sheets...I'll develop tonight!

bob carnie
25-Aug-2017, 09:59
I hope to buy a 11 x14 someday as I own a 11 x14 enlarger and would love to introduce larger negatives to the Devere.

Mark Sampson
25-Aug-2017, 15:48
I just realized that I do,indeed, have some experience with 11x14. In 1979 I was hired by a chain of portrait studios (headquartered in Rochester) as a high-school senior portrait shooter. One of the services this old-line studio offered was the composite portrait- all the members of the graduating class, row upon row of faces. The method was to take a contact print of each submitted yearbook portrait, paste them up on a board, and hand-letter each name beneath. Add the name and logo of the school ("South Seneca High School, Class of 1980" or whatever). The finished poster was then copied, using an 11x14 studio camera (on an iron-wheeled stand) and hot lights; the resulting negative was contact-printed for sale to students. The original composite was, I believe, delivered to the client school to hang in the hallway. An enormous amount of hand work in that pre-digital age... but then the studio wasn't paying us much.
The "Composite Dept." was a hangout for photographers not on assignment... the studio had hired a dozen of us that year. I was useful down there because I knew how to load a film holder (unlike most of my colleagues). But one day I coerced the cranky old staffer who ran the department into letting a bunch of us pose for our own group portrait, using the composite setup, and we did. Of course it was goofy, (it was after lunch on Friday) and the lighting was awful, focus wasn't great, exposure was long (so blurred), but it was fun just the same. I'm sure no copies still exist. And that's the sum total of my experience shooting 11x14.
For the record, I must state that I cannot remember the brand of the camera, stand, or lens; the f/stop or the duration of the exposure, or the type of film used (although it was certainly a Kodak product, probably Professional Copy 4125). Nor will I suggest that this story will be of any use to anyone wishing to shoot 11x14; but I had fun doing it, and remembering it all.

Robert Brazile
26-Aug-2017, 03:51
I came across some 11x14 plate holders locally, so I picked up a couple lenses that would cover, and fashioned a very silly sliding-box camera out of scrap wood and cardboard. Managed to grind a decent ground glass, pour two plates (man, those big ones take a long time to dry), and shoot a couple of shots in my shop -- the thing took up the entirety of my not-so-big workbench -- and managed to get results. The shots weren't very good; in particular, focusing was difficult with various parts of the camera attempting to dissociate themselves from each other every time I tried to slide the back forward or backward to get focus but it was enough fun that I'll certainly repeat the experiment once I improve the middle part of the camera, either by building a simple (probably German-style) bellows, or at the very least, by making a slightly better pair of sliding boxes out of thin plywood.

Not expecting to take this thing on the road ever, but perhaps I'll build one someday that will allow it.

Robert

Duolab123
27-Aug-2017, 10:32
I just realized that I do,indeed, have some experience with 11x14. In 1979 I was hired by a chain of portrait studios (headquartered in Rochester) as a high-school senior portrait shooter. One of the services this old-line studio offered was the composite portrait- all the members of the graduating class, row upon row of faces. The method was to take a contact print of each submitted yearbook portrait, paste them up on a board, and hand-letter each name beneath. Add the name and logo of the school ("South Seneca High School, Class of 1980" or whatever). The finished poster was then copied, using an 11x14 studio camera (on an iron-wheeled stand) and hot lights; the resulting negative was contact-printed for sale to students. The original composite was, I believe, delivered to the client school to hang in the hallway. An enormous amount of hand work in that pre-digital age... but then the studio wasn't paying us much.
The "Composite Dept." was a hangout for photographers not on assignment... the studio had hired a dozen of us that year. I was useful down there because I knew how to load a film holder (unlike most of my colleagues). But one day I coerced the cranky old staffer who ran the department into letting a bunch of us pose for our own group portrait, using the composite setup, and we did. Of course it was goofy, (it was after lunch on Friday) and the lighting was awful, focus wasn't great, exposure was long (so blurred), but it was fun just the same. I'm sure no copies still exist. And that's the sum total of my experience shooting 11x14.
For the record, I must state that I cannot remember the brand of the camera, stand, or lens; the f/stop or the duration of the exposure, or the type of film used (although it was certainly a Kodak product, probably Professional Copy 4125). Nor will I suggest that this story will be of any use to anyone wishing to shoot 11x14; but I had fun doing it, and remembering it all.

That's a great story. Most people don't remember what "Cut and Paste" really was and how it worked. I remember in the 80's photo typesetters. It would print in different fonts black letters on thin photo paper. This output was then "cut and Pasted into a composite for the process camera.

Today it's how fast you are with a mouse. I think the old ways were a lot more fun!
Best Regards, Mike

dodphotography
7-Sep-2017, 07:28
Great resource here.

I've contemplated the jump, numerous times. I spent a few years with 810 almost exclusively and recently downgraded to 45. Its now the third time I've come to 45 but it's taken me some time to realize I just love contact printing. A friend recently offered me an 1114 at a great value so the time may be right for me.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

angusparker
8-Sep-2017, 01:58
I came across some 11x14 plate holders locally, so I picked up a couple lenses that would cover, and fashioned a very silly sliding-box camera out of scrap wood and cardboard. Managed to grind a decent ground glass, pour two plates (man, those big ones take a long time to dry), and shoot a couple of shots in my shop -- the thing took up the entirety of my not-so-big workbench -- and managed to get results. The shots weren't very good; in particular, focusing was difficult with various parts of the camera attempting to dissociate themselves from each other every time I tried to slide the back forward or backward to get focus but it was enough fun that I'll certainly repeat the experiment once I improve the middle part of the camera, either by building a simple (probably German-style) bellows, or at the very least, by making a slightly better pair of sliding boxes out of thin plywood.

Not expecting to take this thing on the road ever, but perhaps I'll build one someday that will allow it.

Robert

Just make sure to get holders that fit at the same time you get the camera. 11x14 isn't always standard, especially with the older cameras.


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