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RSalles
4-Jan-2016, 22:15
Hi,

Yesterday I have uploaded some content showing a medium-level difficulty video of Post-processing a digital shot using Linux + Gimp.
It comes actually very handy, as we usually don't need the superlative power of all the Photoshop tools, but what we need, we can find at one click distance in Gimp.
Usually I edit a "exported from raw" file as TIF 16 bit: in the video I'll show a 8 bit jpeg, as it's faster and less boring to watch :D

Edited pic:

https://farm2.staticflickr.com/1452/24101516991_648808c45d_b.jpg (https://flic.kr/p/CHLzjp)_MG_8356Pes-2015 (https://flic.kr/p/CHLzjp) by Renato Salles (https://www.flickr.com/photos/sallesrenato/), no Flickr

Link: for the video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uLl_lwtrrKE

Enjoy,,

Renato

BetterSense
5-Jan-2016, 05:57
Thank you. It is always tough that how-to resources are typically only for Adobe products. Foe the odd times I sometimes need to edit things it's not worth installing Windows.

IanG
5-Jan-2016, 08:34
I've been using GIMP for a few years now it's a very capable piece of software, I don't own Photoshop although I have the cut back version that came with my scanner but never installed it. I'm still using a 2004 version of Paintshop Pro.

Ian

dpn
5-Jan-2016, 09:05
How is color management on Linux now? The last time I tried an open source process, color management was the stumbling block. How about Epson printer drivers?

rbultman
5-Jan-2016, 10:13
Interesting video. How can I get started answering the question, why did you do what you did?

djdister
5-Jan-2016, 11:02
How is color management on Linux now? The last time I tried an open source process, color management was the stumbling block. How about Epson printer drivers?

This has been the problem - there's no question that GIMP is a versatile and capable program, but just try sending that image to an Epson photo printer and see if you get the same results as using a Windows or Apple computer with native Windows/Mac Epson drivers... anyone?

RSalles
5-Jan-2016, 17:29
Interesting video. How can I get started answering the question, why did you do what you did?
Easy, because I can, and if I could, you can too,

Cheers,

Renato (who is not 100% sure if he understood your question)

RSalles
5-Jan-2016, 17:54
How is color management on Linux now? The last time I tried an open source process, color management was the stumbling block. How about Epson printer drivers?
It's not that difficult these days, as you can work in a given color space and color profile and print using that same color profile latter. Linux have some robusts color management systems, I have LittleCMS in this workstation. ArgillCMS is generally used for Display color profiling, as its compatible with a lot of color profiler devices.
For printing, I can't give you the best answer, as I do all my photo work in B&W on the wet, and the colour work is printed at a professional bureau - for the low volume of color it doesn't worth to have a high end color printer, at least for me,

Cheers,

Renato

RSalles
5-Jan-2016, 18:05
Some links for colour management with linux, for those interested in a first approach:

http://www.russellcottrell.com/photo/LinuxWorkflow.htm

http://www.argyllcms.com/

Renato

rbultman
5-Jan-2016, 19:17
Easy, because I can, and if I could, you can too,

Cheers,

Renato (who is not 100% sure if he understood your question)

I use Lightroom for PP. It is simple for me to use, but I do very little in the way of adjustments. I suppose I need to do a little Googling, look at some how-to's, etc, to learn how to use Gimp. Just curious if you started learning Gimp with any particular book or internet resource.

RSalles
5-Jan-2016, 21:42
Hi Rob,

I used to work with Adobe LR also when did much more digital work then analog. One thing that I consider better with LR then with Gimp is meta-data categorization and collections. But with film, using a scanner to digitalize some film to upload to the web it simply doesn't make sense any more. Al the data related to the shooting instance - f-number, lens, speed film, ISO, etc, etc have to be filled manually, so, what's the gain of metadata capabilities with LR? I prefer to have files with paper with this data writen by hand, close to the negative sleeves as a dataset.

But if I have a work in studio or outdoors I mainly shot with the digital gear - as I usually do when working with colour - why not?

Well, but what's the point with Gimp, why not Photoshop or similar?

First, because it works with Linux flawlessly, and I use Linux instead Windows for the price - it's free - because the stupid amount of virus in many previous CPU's I had infected and the annoyance to have to update anti-virus all the time, or letting it run in parallel consuming processing power, etc. I find that Linux runs smoother also then Windows, and has less processor consuming rate.

Another issue with LR is the Cloud initiative by Adobe, I don't know if it works well when I have to go disconnected from the web, probably yes, dunno, but living in a small city with internet connection via wi-fi, with many blackouts - sometimes by days, as in the last month due to a heavy thunderstorm, it can be an issue.

I can also run Gimp installed in a USB stick, in any computer available if needed.

You can give it a try - please visit the link of Pat Davis in the video - explore the possibilities of GMIC - a set of filters and tools with nothing close to it in PS, work with 16 bits in the beta version of Gimp or 32 bits if your CPU have enough power, and explore... See if the FX-Foundry and GEGL filters have something interesting to your work. In general, the work with Gimp have to do with sharpening without artifacts in a very controlled way, suppression of digital noise without erasing details in the low portion of the tonal curve, basic dodge-burning, and digital masks with channels - this allows me to work in different areas of the image, lights and darks, applying sharpening or noise reduction in a very controlled way. With conversion using film emulation you can add grain, choose a film-look for your shot between maybe one hundred of different film types - both colour or B&W including instant film or toning. There is a lot to explore,

Have fun,

Renato

rbultman
6-Jan-2016, 03:19
Renato,

Thanks for the detailed response. I will have to give Gimp a try again.

Which version do you run? Are you running stable or the 2.9 development snapshot?

Regards,
Rob

RSalles
6-Jan-2016, 08:01
Hi Rob,

What I run here is the unstable development version 2.9.3

For Linux you can find it here: http://www.ubuntumaniac.com/2014/09/install-gimp-291-in-linux-ubuntu-debian.html

And for Windows, here: https://www.gimp.org/downloads/

Cheers,

Renato