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jernejk
22-Dec-2015, 03:55
My first steps in LF have been trying to do some closeups. Learning point: 5x7 camera has a really, really thin DoF! I have a 300mm lens and was shooting with bellows extended to about 380mm at effective f20. According to PhotoBuddy I have only about 2cm of DoF!

Seems like closeups are very challenging with LF, or it leads to a specific minimalistic style?

Drew Bedo
22-Dec-2015, 06:50
Well—shooting at 1:1 is challenging in any format. With a DSLR it can be a bit less so because so much is automatic and the cost of bad images is just a few clicks do delete them.

Consider the following techniques: Do not shoot wide open—stop down, Strong lighting or multiple "pops" of the strobes, long exposures (check reprocity). Use the movements available on your camera to place the zone of focus where it willdo the most good.

Whole books have been written on this.

jernejk
22-Dec-2015, 07:45
The difference between 35mm and LF here is that, for example taking a picture of a small butterfly at 1:1 would fill the frame on 35mm, while it would leave plenty of room on LF, and filling the LF frame would be quite a magnification. I understand the techniques, but even stopping down to f64 would give me a few centimeters at best.

Peter Lewin
22-Dec-2015, 08:51
I believe what the OP is saying is that macro photography is easier with a DSLR, and I believe that is a true statement. The only advantage I can see for LF in macro work is the ability to shift the focus plane, which may or may not be needed. As in many threads comparing LF with a DSLR or 35mm camera, frequently it comes down to which camera and process we, as users, enjoy more, rather than the technical advantage of one format over the other.

Ken Lee
22-Dec-2015, 09:13
As others have suggested, if you're shooting LF film, a subject of moderate size can be appropriate. When enlarged, the results can be impressive.

See http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/showthread.php?120079-Post-Your-Photos-Made-At-Close-Distance for a few examples.

Stephen Thomason
22-Dec-2015, 12:36
If you are using studio strobes, place them as close as you can get to the subject and not see them on the ground glass. Fire the main at full power and use your incident flash reading. Be sure to allow for bellows extension. Fire the others separately and set them to your liking. Then fire away.

Welcome to large format - get ready to have a ton of fun.

Jim Galli
22-Dec-2015, 15:59
My first steps in LF have been trying to do some closeups. Learning point: 5x7 camera has a really, really thin DoF! I have a 300mm lens and was shooting with bellows extended to about 380mm at effective f20. According to PhotoBuddy I have only about 2cm of DoF!

Seems like closeups are very challenging with LF, or it leads to a specific minimalistic style?

There are many on my pages, but yes to minimalism. I love the look wide open with a selective sharp plane and the rest out of focus. An acquired taste I suppose and not for everyone, but honestly, if you just want a sharp close up with everything in focus, the I-phone works fine.

Leszek Vogt
22-Dec-2015, 16:15
Ha, 2cm is better than 1/8" (or less) in focus....when I shoot in digital 35mm and at F16 or higher. Just find a point that that you wish to focus on and shoot away.

Les

rbultman
23-Dec-2015, 05:10
Ha, 2cm is better than 1/8" (or less) in focus....when I shoot in digital 35mm and at F16 or higher. Just find a point that that you wish to focus on and shoot away.

Les

2cm is better than 3/4", not 1/8". That's more like chisel thin instead of razor thin. ;)

Drew Bedo
23-Dec-2015, 05:12
Another strategy is to use oversized props. This can give the look of true macro while letting you shoot at smaller extensions at a larger working distance.

These "cut stones" are actually each ~ 1.5" across. The shot is still "Macro" because it was done in 8x10 and the working distance was under a foot.