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View Full Version : Did he use a Cook Portrait lens ?



diversey
15-Dec-2015, 13:11
Just read this online, which is so interesting!


http://www.bjp-online.com/2015/11/portraits-of-remembrance-glass-plate-photographs-of-british-service-personnel/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hX_bGqqkzDg&feature=youtu.be

Mark Sawyer
15-Dec-2015, 13:41
Yes, a Cooke Series IIb Portrellic 10.5-inch f/4.5, by the looks.

Jim Galli
16-Dec-2015, 12:58
Yes, a Cooke Series IIb Portrellic 10.5-inch f/4.5, by the looks.

Looks like a IIe to me which neither one would be available in 1915. The IIb was available very late '20's or is it mid '30's and the IIe not until mid 1950's. Of course, not to spoil a good story, no one else on earth would question the veracity.

Just looked at the flicker. Definitely a IIe.

Mark Sawyer
16-Dec-2015, 14:52
Just looked at the flicker. Definitely a IIe.

I'll go along with that! I was going with an earlier version to try to match the time frame given.

Steven Tribe
16-Dec-2015, 16:01
What was more interesting to me was the use of the same studio/backcloth as in WW1. It appears that the studio has existed in the same location in the market town of Lewes (near Brighton in SE England) since 1858 at 158 High Street with the Reeves family still living above the studio! They still has their old stock of over 100,000 glass plates as well as studio equipment.

Jim Galli
16-Dec-2015, 16:31
What was more interesting to me was the use of the same studio/backcloth as in WW1. It appears that the studio has existed in the same location in the market town of Lewes (near Brighton in SE England) since 1858 at 158 High Street with the Reeves family still living above the studio! They still has their old stock of over 100,000 glass plates as well as studio equipment.

What an unbelievable treasure! The whole idea of using same camera, same backdrop as your family had done 100 years and more previous is simply incredible.

Mark Sawyer
16-Dec-2015, 17:37
What an unbelievable treasure! The whole idea of using same camera, same backdrop as your family had done 100 years and more previous is simply incredible.

Indeed! I have an 11x14 studio camera owned by the Schubert Brothers, well-known Wisconsin portrait photographers from 1883 to 1932. Kiel, Chiton, Plymouth, Elkhart Lake, New Holstein, and Brillion, Wisconsin. A few of their negatives were rescued from a landfill and posted on-line for genealogical research:

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~calumet/26a.htm

I'd like to get the camera back to one of the Wisconsin historical societies one day. I wonder how many of us are sitting on treasures like this? I know you have a panorama camera with a wonderful history...

diversey
16-Dec-2015, 18:11
The funny thing in the video is that the images on ground glass are not upside down.