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View Full Version : Chicago Art Institute, Alfred Stieglitz and the 19th Century



Randy Moe
16-Nov-2015, 10:41
I saw this yesterday after Chicago LF club meeting.

This is absolutely the best photo exhibit I have ever seen, I even liked the descriptions. The only flaw was the slimy touch screens for a couple untouchable books. Ugh!

I won't bore you with details as ARTIC has a good online description.

But you must see and compare in person, this is rare original prints, with many side by side treatments of the same image. Silver gelatin next to Gum/PT and more.

Really old salt prints, looking great!

A must see, as online is worthless.

http://www.artic.edu/exhibition/alfred-stieglitz-and-19th-century

John Jarosz
16-Nov-2015, 14:39
How dark was it? Do I need to bring a flashlight?

Wayne
16-Nov-2015, 15:20
How dark was it? Do I need to bring a flashlight?

:cool:
Last time I was there was with a legally blind photographer friend (RIP) who could see the exhibit as well as I.

Randy Moe
16-Nov-2015, 15:25
How dark was it? Do I need to bring a flashlight?

Not dark at all, now that you mention it. ARTIC does hang black cloth over some prints elsewhere, but not this exhibit. It's all under glass, which I don't like, but it's reality.

I could see everything easily and I am another half blind photographer. Next visit I am shooting all of it with my iPod 6 which works really well under these conditions.

Richard Wasserman
16-Nov-2015, 15:36
Next visit I am shooting all of it with my iPod 6 which works really well under these conditions.

Except that the Art Institute does not allow photography to take place in photography galleries. You can photograph just about anywhere else in the building, but photographing photographs is verboten.

Randy Moe
16-Nov-2015, 16:42
Except that the Art Institute does not allow photography to take place in photography galleries. You can photograph just about anywhere else in the building, but photographing photographs is verboten.

OK, but I saw no signs.

I'll memorize them!

John Jarosz
16-Nov-2015, 16:44
I wonder if you ask why, they'll say so no one uses flash (which disturbs other viewers) because it's too dark for photos without flash?

Richard Wasserman
16-Nov-2015, 16:51
I wonder if you ask why, they'll say so no one uses flash (which disturbs other viewers) because it's too dark for photos without flash?

I have asked why and was told that it was the rule. BTW, there are no signs, just humans saying that photos are not allowed. It's the same at The Museum of Contemporary Photography down the street. I got in trouble there by photographing at an opening for a Lee Friedlander exhibit. Mr Friedlander was there with a camera around his neck and no one yelled at him...

Jac@stafford.net
16-Nov-2015, 18:01
I would seriously consider attending, but I would like to know how close to the exhibit I can park my car, and sleep in it. I am mobility disadvantaged.
.

Randy Moe
16-Nov-2015, 18:29
With carefull instructions you can park right next to the handicapped entrance 4 stories underground and use a very close elevator. Then cross one street and west 1/2 block. I would sleep in that garage, but I know how to stealth camp anywhere. A van with curtains is best.


I would seriously consider attending, but I would like to know how close to the exhibit I can park my car, and sleep in it. I am mobility disadvantaged.
.

Richard Wasserman
16-Nov-2015, 18:52
The Art Institute has valet parking at the entrance to the Modern Wing on Monroe Street.

If you decide to come Jac please let me know.

koh303
16-Nov-2015, 19:01
Too bad that place is for the rich only.
Add to that some of the "best in its class" public transit Chicago has to offer and you have a winner all around (though its true, with some finagling you can find a meter spot in the general area, or pay out the nose for a lot spot.
I think they have one free afternoon for chicago residents, though they still haggle with each and every person about the "suggested donation", and make a real crossed face when you say zero.

Wayne
16-Nov-2015, 19:48
I would seriously consider attending, but I would like to know how close to the exhibit I can park my car, and sleep in it. I am mobility disadvantaged.
.

Probably Wisconsin...When I left Illinois 30 years ago just about everything fun that you could do in a car was illegal.

Randy Moe
16-Nov-2015, 21:12
I was asked to describe my parking suggestion in a PM. I may as well post it here also.


The area immediately North of the Art Institute under the entire Millennium Park is parking lot. You enter from S Columbus drive just north of Monroe from either side into a down ramp and the trick is keep your bearing and head for the south east corner of the garage, lowest level, which can just take a standard E150 Ford Van at the tallest. There is an elevator there that will bring you up at Columbus and Monroe at the closest access to the handicapped entrance into the Modern Wing. Directly inside are free wheelchairs. The Stieglitz exhibit is on the lower level of the old main building, there are elevators everywhere, some hidden.

https://www.google.com/maps/@41.8809185,-87.6215783,17z

I find it is best to come from Lake Shore Drive to Monroe and avoid cross town traffic through the Loop from the west. I generally came from the west on Grand or Chicago and then straight south on S Columbus to Artic, when I used to drive a Ford Van.



Now I take the Blue Line subway train during off hours and get off at Monroe. It's a short walk for me, both from my home and once downtown.


https://www.google.com/maps/@41.8944088,-87.6307085,15z

I believe the museum offers valet parking at the Modern Wing entrance. The museum is big, you will need a full day. Try Remington's on Michigan ave for a very good $16 hamburger. I recently had one. The steaks are beyond my budget and appetite. Don't eat at the museum, especially the hamburger...

http://centralcamera.com/ is nearby and worth a look.



As I am member, if you come when I can meet you, I can get one person in for free.

I love the place, a very fine museum. I have seen EU museums, which are also amazing, but ARTIC and Chicago bows to no one. :)

Tony Karnezis
5-Jan-2016, 22:32
Except that the Art Institute does not allow photography to take place in photography galleries. You can photograph just about anywhere else in the building, but photographing photographs is verboten.


I have asked why and was told that it was the rule. BTW, there are no signs, just humans saying that photos are not allowed. It's the same at The Museum of Contemporary Photography down the street. I got in trouble there by photographing at an opening for a Lee Friedlander exhibit. Mr Friedlander was there with a camera around his neck and no one yelled at him...

Photography was permitted at the Stieglitz exhibit and at the photography exhibit on the main floor, including the photographs themselves. I asked, so maybe it's not a hard and fast rule. I was one of only a couple people taking pics at the Stieglitz exhibit, but many people were taking photos on the main floor in plain view of the employees.

I also went to the Museum of Contemporary Art over Christmas; photography was allowed in all but the main Pop Art exhibit room. Here, signs were posted, and the employees confirmed it.

Richard Wasserman
6-Jan-2016, 00:01
Hmm, maybe I should take this personally! They don't like me perhaps? Or maybe they've all been inundated with people carrying cellphones putting their live on social media and they've given up? The rules seem to have changed...

diversey
6-Jan-2016, 08:11
Several museums including art museum are free in Chicago for Bank of America customers on first full weekend each month.

Kirk Gittings
6-Jan-2016, 08:16
How long is the show going to be up? This summer I will be in Chicago again teaching at SAIC and would love to see it, but I can't justify a special trip.

diversey
6-Jan-2016, 08:20
Through March 27, 2016.
Can we attend your lectures in Chicago this summer?


How long is the show going to be up? This summer I will be in Chicago again teaching at SAIC and would love to see it, but I can't justify a special trip.

Kirk Gittings
6-Jan-2016, 08:36
Crap. I'm sorry to miss that.

I'm flattered by your interest in my class. Thank you. Sorry but no for a couple of reasons. First-you couldn't get through the security in the building. Two-the class is always very full-simply no room and it becomes an insult to the people who are paying 3K (I think) to take the class.

diversey
6-Jan-2016, 09:02
This is too bad. Thanks!


Crap. I'm sorry to miss that.

I'm flattered by your interest in my class. Thank you. Sorry but no for a couple of reasons. First-you couldn't get through the security in the building. Two-the class is always very full-simply no room and it becomes an insult to the people who are paying 3K (I think) to take the class.

Tony Karnezis
7-Jan-2016, 02:24
Hmm, maybe I should take this personally! They don't like me perhaps? Or maybe they've all been inundated with people carrying cellphones putting their live on social media and they've given up? The rules seem to have changed...

When I asked if I could take photos, I simply said "I'm not Wasserman," and they said ok. ;)

Like you surmised, I'll bet it's like photography at rock concerts - too hard to police everyone. Times have changed.

cowanw
11-Jan-2016, 10:39
We just got back from a weekend visit to this and a South Shore gallery visit in Munster with Adam's museum prints from his daughter's collection.
Quite a point and counter point to see the two back to back. High contrast and sharp on the one hand and lower contrast and textured papers on the other.
I also have seen an original Lodge Pole Pines printed as a platinum print, previously; this was a silver gelatin print with high contrast but soft focus. I preferred the platinum treatment. I spent a long time trying to see signs of burning and dodging and I have always wondered whether the shaft of light is more dodge than not in Winter Sunrise, Sierra Nevada, Lone Pine.
The Art institute collection is superb. A very nice exhibit of several practitioners of the time. Nice to see Day and Coburn and Evans. I thought the prints of white were not very representative, excepting the superb portrait of Stieglitz.
What is particularily interesting is the original enlargement prints of a few prints compared with the silver gelatin contact prints of later years.
One of these is the The Steerage, with a very nice print of the bight hat and walkway, compared to the silver print which has the figures in steerage of similar bright tones as the hat and walkway. To me the recognition of this print as a signpost of modernism is more apparent in the printing than the image.
I should have taken a monopod. as the lighting yielded speeds of 1/30 sec for me.

Tony Karnezis
13-Jan-2016, 18:52
What is particularily interesting is the original enlargement prints of a few prints compared with the silver gelatin contact prints of later years.
One of these is the The Steerage, with a very nice print of the bight hat and walkway, compared to the silver print which has the figures in steerage of similar bright tones as the hat and walkway. To me the recognition of this print as a signpost of modernism is more apparent in the printing than the image. I should have taken a monopod. as the lighting yielded speeds of 1/30 sec for me.

That was my favorite part of the exhibit.

r_a_feldman
11-Feb-2016, 19:53
In would also recommend seeing the 40th Anniversary Exhibit at the Columbia College Museum of Contemporary Photography, about a half mile south of the Art Institute, at 600 S Michigan Avenue, through April 10, 2016. It is free. I was there briefly today and intend to go back several times. There are about 150 photos, most 20th Century. Unfortunately, they are almost collaged floor-to ceiling, so there are not optimal viewing conditions. Still, quite a range of photos.

I enjoyed the exhibit at the AIC. I thought the explanatory panels were a little provincial, however, giving too much credit to Stieglitz for making photography ART. Julia Margaret Cameron had promoted her prints as art, which the exhibit overlooks.

Bob