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Wsufans
22-Oct-2015, 10:35
I posted this link to the FB group but thought I would post it here in case others might be interested. I recently sent inquires to Smithsonian and NASA asking about the cameras et al that the astronauts used in manned space flight. Got a reply back from folks at Smithsonian. They suggested I read Earthrise by Robert Poole. One of the people this author talks about is Richard W. Underwood you can read about him here http://apps.trb.org/cmsfeed/TRBNetProjectDisplay.asp?ProjectID=3966

I suspect that many of you grew up during the 60s as I did. The space program was a big part of that time period.

Some of the questions I was asking was about equipment, training, and why did they do what they did, how did they decide what photos to take, how did they set the exposures, what film did they use.

We all have seen the images but few have given much thought or discussion on what happened behind the scenes to produce them.

**PRO**

Richard Wasserman
22-Oct-2015, 11:19
I can't help very much. I know they used a bunch of Hasselblads, which I suppose means this thread should be moved—no large format content here.

NASA recently put all 8400 0f the Apollo Mission photos on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/projectapolloarchive/albums

Drew Wiley
22-Oct-2015, 11:35
Handles and cranks all had to be specially modified for use with space gloves. Same with tools. One of my clients viewed in person a battery drill last week specially modified for space. I told him where to find it. The basic unit goes for around 8K (has to be totally spark-proof with a nonflammable battery too), plus
the custom moulded handle. So 16K to 20K wouldn't surprise me. Probably way more if it was a batch order and a custom die was involved for the housing. But
that might get offset if the unit has been marketed for analogous applications, such as thick Kevlar gloves or especially thick electrical gloves. In this case it was
one of Elon Musk's high tech ventures (or misadventures?) involved.

Wsufans
22-Oct-2015, 11:51
Hasselblad has posted this too http://www.hasselblad.com/inspiration/our-story/hasselblad-in-space

But I was thinking that others on this forum might be interested. The lady that put me onto the Earthrise book is supposedly writing a book for Air & Space on the topic.

All those photos on Flickr are one of the reasons I have asked the questions to Air & Space and NASA. The story behind the photos has yet to be fully told. I don't know about you but I would like to read it.

**PRO**

Wsufans
22-Oct-2015, 12:25
Here is John Glenn's camera

http://airandspace.si.edu/collections/artifact.cfm?object=nasm_A19670198000

Wsufans
22-Oct-2015, 12:46
http://airandspace.si.edu/collections/artifact.cfm?object=nasm_A19770554000

Scott Carpenter's camera.

Mark Sampson
22-Oct-2015, 15:54
Bob Salomon would know for sure, but I believe that on some shuttle missions they used a Linhof Aero Technika with a 5" roll back.

Jac@stafford.net
22-Oct-2015, 15:57
Bob Salomon would know for sure, but I believe that on some shuttle missions they used a Linhof Aero Technika with a 5" roll back.

Why would Bob Salomon know for sure?
I look forward to some authoritative info.
.

Mark Sampson
22-Oct-2015, 16:34
Mr. Salomon was the Linhof rep for the USA (HP Marketing) for many years, and knows more about Linhof cameras than anyone else who posts here. My own memory of these things is pretty sketchy... I do recall the story that Wally Schirra bought a Hasselblad in a Houston camera store for his Mercury mission; but that may have come from a 'Blad magazine ad.

Wsufans
22-Oct-2015, 17:48
Rats wrong first link. That is what I get for multitasking.

Read this link about Mr. Richard W Underwood. http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/history/oral_histories/UnderwoodRW/UnderwoodRW_10-17-00.htm Yes Wally did by a Blad and just about didn't get to take to the big dance.

LabRat
22-Oct-2015, 18:50
I had heard that in the beginning, engineers did not take space photography seriously, as they thought that film would be hopelessly fogged by radiation in that environment... The Glenn camera was something that he had pressed for just to see if it would work anyway...

I attended a screening of one of the IMAX shuttle/Hubble repair films that was being considered for an Oscar... There was a Q&A after the screening, and I finally had a chance to ask the filmmaker about what happens to that large format long roll (almost a mile long) of film while in the radiation of space!?!! He said that was a VERY good question, and then spent 10 or 15 minutes explaining the big technical problems that they faced with it, and that the first films were hopelessly fogged, as the fast filmstock was prone to fogging, but found the medium speed stocks were just barely OK for shorter missions, but needed a film safe for longer flights... He said manned Mars flights were going to be a digital affair...

Steve K

Jmarmck
22-Oct-2015, 23:09
In the early 1980's there were the SIR-A and SIR-B missions from the space shuttle, SIR being Shuttle Imaging Radar. I have had the honor of personally handling and learning photo interpretation from this imagery. While is was not film based it was proof that ground penetrating radar was feasible.

Jac@stafford.net
23-Oct-2015, 07:46
Bob Salomon would know for sure, but I believe that on some shuttle missions they used a Linhof Aero Technika with a 5" roll back.

Very good. Thanks. Here's a photo of Tom Jones with the camera. (https://skywalking1.files.wordpress.com/2013/09/tom-with-cannon-of-250-linhof-on-fd.jpg) Far easier to muscle it in micro-gravity! Jones mentions that they got 100 exposures per roll.

jp
23-Oct-2015, 12:01
NASA recently put all 8400 0f the Apollo Mission photos on Flickr. https://www.flickr.com/photos/projectapolloarchive/albums

Thats pretty cool!

Bob Salomon
23-Oct-2015, 12:52
Why would Bob Salomon know for sure?
I look forward to some authoritative info.
.

Because I am the one that sold the Linhof Aero Technikas to NASA and I am also the one trained the astronauts on how to use the cameras at NASA.

Drew Wiley
23-Oct-2015, 13:07
Wow. What a great opportunity, Bob!

Jac@stafford.net
23-Oct-2015, 13:18
Because I am the one that sold the Linhof Aero Technikas to NASA and I am also the one trained the astronauts on how to use the cameras at NASA.

I was hoping that was the case. Thank you, Bob.
.

Bob Salomon
23-Oct-2015, 14:07
Because I am the one that sold the Linhof Aero Technikas to NASA and I am also the one trained the astronauts on how to use the cameras at NASA.

It was an interesting experience, especially trying to figure out how to change the film at the end of the roll. They could not, or would not, turn off the lights inside the Shuttle. They thought about hanging a changing bag on a wall surface but decided against that. To our great pleasure they finally decided to just buy and carry spare vacuum roll backs.
But that was a lot easier then how they decided to change 70mm rolls on the Rollei 6008 cameras that we also sold them. The Rollei used modified Mamiya 70mm backs from the RZ. But to fit the modification the dark slide had to slide into a surface with a slight curve to it. That meant that if not done just right the slide would hang up. Unfortunately the slide was thin enough to be slightly sharp. And when the Astronaught applied some force their hand could slip and the could cut themselves. NASA looked askance at blood particles flooding around the cabin. So they decidided to leave the slides at home and just also bought additional backs for when they had to change film.
If you do a search for Bob Cabana you might be able to see a shot of him juggling the 6008s and lenses during a mission.

Wsufans
23-Oct-2015, 17:37
http://airandspace.si.edu/collections/artifact.cfm?object=nasm_A19700228000

If you go to the air and space web site you can search on Hasselblad and see photos of some of the cameras and accessories in their collection. It is interesting stuff to look at.

Bob there is a lady at Air and Space about to write a book on this topic. PM me and I will put you in touch with her. She might be very interested in listening to your story. Right now this is a story that has largely been untold.

See my link to the interview that NASA did with Richard W. Underwood. It is interesting.