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Gary Tarbert
25-Aug-2015, 19:53
Hi i have just spent several hours editing some shots taken on digital , I was amazed how many i converted to black and white , Even dusk shots with lovely pink skies were converted and i preferred the B&W , It has been a gradual change in taste for me over the last few years , Being a former Velvia shooter (this is an amazing turnaround), i even ordered some from Stone a while back , , I have not shot a sheet yet thank god it was well dated !! I have even converted some old velvia shots to B&W and prefer them .I have a 100 sheets of B&W 8x10 to get through i think on present trend i will finish them before i have used 10 sheets of the Velvia. I was just wondering has anyone else experienced this sort of change in the way they see things so dramatically ?, (oh maybe i should have called the post falling in love with B&W)more positive

Vaughn
25-Aug-2015, 20:33
All too few people use color in their images...they just find a nice color and photograph it. But then too few B&W people use light in their images...they just find a neat atmospheric condition or a neat subject and photograph it.

LabRat
25-Aug-2015, 21:06
Yea, I prefer B/W too...

I find B/W more cerebral, as the tone scale is an abstract of our normal color vision, and by tweaking the process while shooting and in the lab, one can make many different scales of tone that have different moods/feel/vibes... (Like different scales of music...)

Someone once asked me about the practical differences of shooting B/W vs color... I said that color differentiates changes in hue and chroma well, but B/W sees differences in contrast and scale well... (If you shoot a sunset with many subtle shades of color, color film will do well, but B/W not... But if you were say, on a forest floor with dramatic contrasts, color would be at a loss, but B/W would be dramatic, etc...)

But one uncommon thing I have noticed about B/W is (rarely) some viewers of a print do not have the ability to recognize what is happening on a B/W print... (It makes their head spin!!!) Maybe it's just too abstract for them when viewing a fine art print... But they would "get" a color poster of puppies-in-a-basket with color balloons...

Steve K

StoneNYC
25-Aug-2015, 21:17
It comes and goes.

I've not shot any serious color in a while (but plan to very soon).

Your brain starts seeing in B&W tones.

But you can fall back in love with color once you see those big beautiful 8x10 color Velvia50 transparencies on the light table ;)

Alan Gales
25-Aug-2015, 21:35
I've always been a color guy. When I started shooting 35mm in 1982 I felt that b&w was behind us. Old technology just like b&w television sets. My favorite photographer was Pete Turner. I was in love with Kodachrome 25 and Cibachrome printing. I shot color for color.

Today, I love b&w. Especially b&w portraiture. Why the change? I'm not sure I know. I still enjoy color but there is just something mysterious about the tonality of b&w. It's other worldly.

Gary Tarbert
26-Aug-2015, 01:59
138896138895 One of the ones i converted today

Old-N-Feeble
26-Aug-2015, 03:18
Those are both fabulous, Gary. I do prefer the mood of the monochrome version though. It has more moody impact, IMO.

redshift
26-Aug-2015, 04:29
138896138895 One of the ones i converted today

These illustrate success in both color and b&w because they capture both composition and light.

A photo with brilliant color can be initially compelling without artful composition or light, a B&W of the same fails.

For me, a compelling B&W is more challenging to produce. I prefer the challenge.

h2oman
26-Aug-2015, 06:34
I'm starting to go the other way...

Kirk Gittings
26-Aug-2015, 07:25
All too few people use color in their images...they just find a nice color and photograph it. But then too few B&W people use light in their images...they just find a neat atmospheric condition or a neat subject and photograph it.

:)

Lachlan 717
26-Aug-2015, 14:59
If colour (E6) was as cheap and as easy as B&W to process, I'd use it a whole lot more.

Especially if you could still get it in ULF sizes!!

Paul Metcalf
26-Aug-2015, 15:16
Well, industry impacted my color pursuits. I was very happy shooting 4x5 transparencies and making enlarged prints on Ilfochrome. My entire color process from capture to print was set and functioning. I learned the processes, a bit through trial and error, as well as observing others who did this. I made the investments in the equipment necessary to utilize this. I was happy and could focus on making new images and not on having to learn or adapt to a new process/processes. Then Ilfochrome went away. I still have some paper and some chemicals, but when that's gone I'm done with large format color. I could adapt but I'm not planning on it. My color work is moving to digital capture (small format), not sure what output because I haven't found anything I like yet (mainly the processes). Maybe I'll pursue some new subject material as well like astrophotography. We'll see. I'd like to think my color side of photography has evolved because of my desire to evolve but that's not the case.

So far, industry hasn't messed with my B&W processes, although the contact printing on silver chloride paper has been "challenged" (mostly getting terribly expensive). The other types of printing I do are still pursuable. Fingers crossed.

Drew Wiley
26-Aug-2015, 15:24
Since I shoot and print both, it's largely a matter of scheduling. Color printing is a little more intensive, so doubt I'll be doing much in the coming year. I'm geared
up to resume it later. I miss Cibachrome but have found a worthy substitute in Fuji Supergloss printed from color negs. I also limit my color printing due to health
concerns. Don't want to get oversensitized to nasty RA4 chem, even though I have the fumes etc far better under control than most labs and dkrms. Have zero interest in digital or inkjet. Different look.

tgtaylor
26-Aug-2015, 15:57
I'd give the C-41 and RA-4 process a close look before giving-up on color film. These two prints were both shot on color negative and printed on Fuji CA at home:

http://spiritsofsilver.com/galleries/chromogenic_c-prints

Both are digital P&S shots of the prints. The print on the left is an un-mounted 16x20 while the one on the right is a mounted 8x10. Both were shot with a Pentax 67II camera in available light.

Thomas

Paul Metcalf
26-Aug-2015, 16:54
Thomas - you have some really great salt prints. I really like that process, so basic, or perhaps elegant is the better term. I use the sun to expose my prints so I get the vagaries around that, which I just love. We'll see about the other color processes, maybe someday I'll get interested. One of the last "color" things I did was to water color paint one of my B&W prints. I've never painted anything (except the house and an old car once). Anything but sitting at a computer (except to post on LFP forum LOL!).

Darin Boville
26-Aug-2015, 17:04
Sort of on topic....in my head I think of myself as primarily a black and white photographer but yet looking back on my work of, say, the last ten years, an awful lot of it, maybe the majority of it, is color.

On the other hand very little of it it is "realistic" color. I have a project ("Waves" : http://www.darinboville.com/waves-color-and-bw/ ) where I have color and black and white images of the same shot. I point out to people that black and white is sort of once removed, sort of abstracted from realistic color, which is part of what gives it its power. Going the other way (turning the color way up instead of way down) is sort of the same move just in the opposite direction--equally abstracted from realistic color.

So maybe you are growing more interested the "abstractedness thing"--you might still find color interesting, just not regular color.

--Darin

Gary Tarbert
26-Aug-2015, 17:17
Sort of on topic....in my head I think of myself as primarily a black and white photographer but yet looking back on my work of, say, the last ten years, an awful lot of it, maybe the majority of it, is color.

On the other hand very little of it it is "realistic" color. I have a project ("Waves" : http://www.darinboville.com/waves-color-and-bw/ ) where I have color and black and white images of the same shot. I point out to people that black and white is sort of once removed, sort of abstracted from realistic color, which is part of what gives it its power. Going the other way (turning the color way up instead of way down) is sort of the same move just in the opposite direction--equally abstracted from realistic color.

So maybe you are growing more interested the "abstractedness thing"--you might still find color interesting, just not regular color.

--Darin You may be right , i am entering a competition next month entitled photography as art , my entry is a colour image but a very strong colour not at all natural colour tones , maybe i have always been a little in favour of stronger colour when shooting in this medium as velvia was the only film i used .I see my workflow moving forward as majority B&W but when i shoot colour it will be images where the colour creates the mood as much as anything else

Jac@stafford.net
26-Aug-2015, 17:23
B&W is color without hue.
.

sun of sand
26-Aug-2015, 17:26
I prefer the color photo posted. B&w a little too pale and the clear horizon far left sticks out
Both are nice

If I could afford or would afford myself color film and developing and printing I'd do much more color
B&w is quite simple and very affordable as well as being equally beautiful
Digital remains 70% or better color for me

StoneNYC
26-Aug-2015, 21:22
If colour (E6) was as cheap and as easy as B&W to process, I'd use it a whole lot more.

Especially if you could still get it in ULF sizes!!

You can (11x14 from kodak at least in C-41 and other sizes if you order enough through Keith Canham) and Fuji, if you talk to the right people (and again buy enough) will probably cut E-6 in ULF sizes for you, but you would have to buy a lot... If you have the cash I would talk to Kenro Izu, he gets Acros100 cut for him in 14x20 by Fuji.

sun of sand
26-Aug-2015, 21:50
What does your signature mean, man
Spit on a rose

Why is that your signature

Randy Moe
26-Aug-2015, 22:47
Look what this catalog did to color and B&W. I really dislike it.

http://viewer.zmags.com/publication/fc44fa3c#/fc44fa3c/1

StoneNYC
27-Aug-2015, 00:19
What does your signature mean, man
Spit on a rose

Why is that your signature

It is an idiom.

It means that even if you wish to put down something beautiful, the thing itself will still be beautiful no matter how hard you try to put it down.

Old-N-Feeble
27-Aug-2015, 07:38
The color version is extremely nice. The soft hues are very pretty but, IMO, take away from the stark mood of the monochrome version.

Gary Tarbert
27-Aug-2015, 16:21
It is an idiom.

It means that even if you wish to put down something beautiful, the thing itself will still be beautiful no matter how hard you try to put it down. I get it:)

Old-N-Feeble
27-Aug-2015, 17:11
Yes, some things are so wonderful and beautiful and perfect that any criticism of that thing should be harshly dealt with from the loving masses.

Alan Gales
27-Aug-2015, 18:54
Yes, some things are so wonderful and beautiful and perfect that any criticism of that thing should be harshly dealt with from the loving masses.

Yeah, I just can't help it that I'm so wonderful, beautiful and perfect. It a gift I have. Don't even think about criticizing me! :cool:

Old-N-Feeble
28-Aug-2015, 03:29
:) :)

Drew Wiley
28-Aug-2015, 08:54
I'm amazed at the special skills some pro photographers have acquired to make even the most beautiful scenes corny and ugly. I was recently backpacking and
road traveling with a beginner photographer who was having a ball taking weather and nite shot with his little digital camera up in high country, along with a few documentary shots of a particular old grump poking his grizzled chin out from under a dark cloth from time to time. But on the way home we stopped somewhere for breakfast where the walls were decorated with color inkjet prints by a well-known second-generation mtn photographer. I just ignored the prints. Looks utterly amateurish to me. Be then my friend volunteers the remark how utterly fake and cheesy they look. Since I knew the real scene involved, having been there numerous times, which is an incredibly stunning location without any doctoring, the only thing artificial PS coloring could do was take it downhill.

Dan O'Farrell
1-Sep-2015, 09:41
Yeah, I just can't help it that I'm so wonderful, beautiful and perfect. It a gift I have. Don't even think about criticizing me! :cool:

Oh, Lord, it's hard to be humble
When you're perfect in every way.....(Mac Davis)

Two23
2-Sep-2015, 16:59
From 1985 to 2005, I shot a lot of film in different formats but very rarely b&w. With digital from 2005 to present I very rarely did anything with b&w. However, about five years ago I began buying old cameras (1900 to 1955) and rarely shoot color in any of them. B&W just seems more accurate to the period. Just the past couple of weeks I began shooting some Gold 400 and Ektar in my Nikon F3/T. I kind of like it now.


Kent in SD

john borrelli
5-Sep-2015, 17:43
Unfortunately, when I shoot black and white i become absolutely mesmerized by the following few details.

I like my photos with a variety of shades of grey (I sometimes think I have discovered a new one), I like my photos with beautiful (to my eyes) detail in the shadows and, (sorry Outdoor Photographer magazine) I like my photos that are creamy and not all-out sharp and contrasty.

Others would probably look at one of these photos and not be at all interested but I can look at them all day.

bob carnie
6-Sep-2015, 06:46
I have to say that I have fallen back in love with colour, The tri colour over palladium prints are exactly what the doctor ordered for me and my solarization project.

Now I must admit that my colour will never match the realism of inkjet, but for me the subtle tones and layering of colour on top of palladium is exquisite. I can now quad tone with Black and White and produce a colour image, as well I can go back to my medium format colour negatives and bring them to print.

David Beal
9-Sep-2015, 11:30
Now that I have 2 plastic inside-the-eye lenses (rather than the 2 natural ones I was born with) I should be able to appreciate color more. I do, but I don't shoot color.

When I was between operations I was amazed that the world through the un-operated eye looked as yellow as a #2 filter. After the second surgery everything was bright and clear. More than before, I stand in awe at the color work people on this forum produce, and I think they have a special talent. Bravo!

But when I get a chance to go out -- not as often as I'd like, as I approach 70 with a bum leg and a bad back -- I view the colorful wonders of nature and look for the shadows between the light. Like a musician friend said, it's the pause between the notes.

Maybe it's something in the brain.

May the Light be Right for all of us.

David Beal
Memories Preserved Photography