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View Full Version : Weston Master II light meters came back to life



tom thomas
22-Jul-2015, 10:20
I'm back after suffering terrible hospitalized pneumonia and now on full time oxygen.
I had a pleasant surprise this spring with two heavy metal Weston Master II meters, one Cine Exposure Meter, the other Universal Exposure Meter. Got them with a couple different cameras on Ebongle and only noticed a flicker on the meters when exposed to light. Thought them dead so I just left them on a shelf catching some nice indirect sun while I was away for 3 months. Returned to find them fully responsive and usable now. If I was doing Mack Sennett movies to use the Cine one.

If your have apparently sick ones, try just exposing the cells to good light and leave them alone for awhile. Old Weston's appear to be tough, heavy metal cases too in outer mildewed leather outer in the case of the one I found in the Graflex 34 kit I got it with. Even the flash bulbs are mouldy. Carefui cleaning will ensue so I can use the 25's.

LabRat
22-Jul-2015, 21:29
I had George Milton at QLM service some of my old Weston selenium celled meters some time ago, and he gave me an important tip...

He said ANY selenium celled meter (or camera) that has been in storage for a long time has to be exposed to light from time to time, or the cells become weak... The cells build up a internal resistance, that is "burned" off from exposure to light, but the meter has to be brought up to bright light very slowly... Don't expose it to bright sunlight at first, but leave it in room light for a week or more but not aimed at a window or sunlight spot... Then it can be aimed at lighter and brighter light, step by step... And don't aim them at the sun at all!!!!

You can use another known good meter to do a rough check against this meter with a grey card, even lit wall, etc...

He said this is the first thing he does with these meters before any calibration of service...

Steve K

tom thomas
30-Jul-2015, 15:41
Thanx Steve. Was in moderate indirect light for awhile. Not in bright direct sunlight. Thanks for the info.

Randy Moe
30-Jul-2015, 16:36
Cool and I just put 2 in deep storage.

So I still remember where that is...

Which is unusual for nonessential bits.

Michael E
31-Jul-2015, 10:16
I'm just preparing for a trip to the US (southwest) and checked a few old light meters to bring along as a backup for my spot meter (I once dropped my meter on the second day of a four weeks trip). My old Weston (not used for many years) didn't respond, but a tiny old Gossen Sixtino from ebay seems to be right on the money. So much in fact that I keep asking myself if I should bring the heavy spot meter at all :-) After reading this, I will leave to Weston out in the open and see if it comes back to life. Thanks!

Jim Jones
31-Jul-2015, 10:45
Michael, I've had broken soldered connections in older Weston meters that were completely dead. The repair isn't difficult for someone used to electrical or fine mechanical work. A Master II is held together by two screws hidden under the back cover plate. These screws have fluted edges rather than slots, but usually a brass tube forced down over them grabs well enough to unscrew them. Cutting a slot facilitates reassembly. Any internal work on meters should be done in a quite clean place. A tiny pit of iron can cause trouble if it is attracted to the meter's magnet.

Randy Moe
31-Jul-2015, 11:29
Michael, I've had broken soldered connections in older Weston meters that were completely dead. The repair isn't difficult for someone used to electrical or fine mechanical work. A Master II is held together by two screws hidden under the back cover plate. These screws have fluted edges rather than slots, but usually a brass tube forced down over them grabs well enough to unscrew them. Cutting a slot facilitates reassembly. Any internal work on meters should be done in a quite clean place. A tiny pit of iron can cause trouble if it is attracted to the meter's magnet.

Good advice on those screws I thought were rivets.

tonyowen
8-Aug-2015, 13:27
Does this problem and hence solution apply to Weston Master V meters?
Reason for query - my meter has not been used for about 20 years but responses to light changes without any apparent tardiness. However over the last month or so the negatives exposed to my Weston meter readings are very dense!!
coincidence - chance - or what (if anything)
regards
Tony

Randy Moe
8-Aug-2015, 13:34
I checked my Weston II today against a Sekonic Twinmate and they were one stop off.

Bill Burk
8-Aug-2015, 15:14
I checked my Weston II today against a Sekonic Twinmate and they were one stop off.

Did you convert the Weston to ASA?

160 on the Weston dial = 250 on the ASA dial for the Twinmate.

When I set them that way, the Weston Master II and Twinmate agree.

Note: Some specimens of Weston Master II meter calculator dial indicate exactly 1/3 stop different than mine when set at exactly the same Light and Emulsion Speed settings.

Randy Moe
8-Aug-2015, 15:47
Did you convert the Weston to ASA?

160 on the Weston dial = 250 on the ASA dial for the Twinmate.

When I set them that way, the Weston Master II and Twinmate agree.

Note: Some specimens of Weston Master II meter calculator dial indicate exactly 1/3 stop different than mine when set at exactly the same Light and Emulsion Speed settings.

No, I did not and that makes them about 1/3 stop. I just rechecked on heavy overcast.

I should have realized as I was reading May, 1941 GE Exposure Booklet for use with GE Mazda Photo Flash and Photo Flood Lamps. It has Film Speed data in both Weston and GE ratings for many films. Weston films speeds are about 1/3 slower than GE.

I was looking at the Guide Number info.

Thanks for the help Bill.