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paulr
27-Apr-2015, 18:33
Autochromes on the beach ...

http://mashable.com/2015/04/23/autochrome-photos-ogorman/

StoneNYC
27-Apr-2015, 22:01
Wow these are stunning, beautiful, but because they are taken by a father of his daughter, I feel like there's a little too much "male gaze" in the images, maybe it's just me, but I wonder what kind of man he was.

Obviously talented, no doubt.

Ultimately this is a VERY cool share! Thanks Paul!

Jim Noel
27-Apr-2015, 22:42
It's just you!

ImSoNegative
28-Apr-2015, 06:12
excellent!!

goamules
28-Apr-2015, 08:16
These are classic poses of the era, almost any serious amateur or professional from Julia Margaret Cameron 50 years earlier, until the 1930s, posed girls in reflective, introspective ways. This man was very good, and didn't waste the expensive plates on "snapshot" poses. Great to see some more Autochromes too.

Peter De Smidt
28-Apr-2015, 08:20
Great stuff.

Peter Lewin
28-Apr-2015, 08:21
These are classic poses of the era, almost any serious amateur or professional from Julia Margaret Cameron 50 years earlier, until the 1930s, posed girls in reflective, introspective ways. This man was very good, and didn't waste the expensive plates on "snapshot" poses. Great to see some more Autochromes too.
I was wondering why his daughter never looked directly at the camera, the "standard" pose we use today. Interesting how times, or perhaps more accurately, culture, change.

goamules
28-Apr-2015, 08:25
People often ask me why people seldom smiled from the daguerreotye age, through wetplate, and into the early 1900s. It's because photography was seen as being a serious document of you and your life. Often, people felt they should look serious, not smile like a lunatic! Over time that changed. In 100 years, people will wonder why all the girls and young women of our era always pursed their lips out in "duck pout" poses!

Drew Wiley
28-Apr-2015, 08:30
Thanks for sharing these. I've always loved the palette of Autochrome. About the only thing in a modern film I can think of which is vaguely similar was the
very grainy pre-E6 Agfachrome, which was available in sheets which I've printed (mostly my older brother's work, though I shot it in 35mm as a teenager), and then the E6 Agfachrome 1000, up to 120 only, which had a wonderful soft scale. Both had muted greens, quite unlike present chrome films (or what remains of these). The attempt to revive high-speed Scotchchrome is a much harsher look. Another photographer who did some lovely Autochromes when she was young, but bridged her way more into the black and white work of our own era would be Laura Gilpin. A few people are trying to revive the process, but it's proving to be trickier than they anticipated.

appletree
28-Apr-2015, 13:43
Wow, these are neat. Never heard of autochrome. Thanks for sharing.

Randy Moe
28-Apr-2015, 13:58
Garrett has insightful comments on historical posing fashion or style.

Today we have the awkward head tilt of the selfie, that looks real strange to me.

Say cheese! :( Was my era, I always refused.

Struan Gray
28-Apr-2015, 14:49
These poses look very influenced by the (by this stage old-fashioned) Pre-Raphaelites and later symbolists, as well as their UK contemporaries in painting like the Birmingham Group. There were artists and photographers who had their sitters engage directly with the viewer, and they tend to be the ones lauded in histories written since modernism arrived on the scene, but regional art galleries in the UK are stuffed with this kind of whispy role-playing portrait. It is one of the things the modernists were keen to react against.

My Grandparents would all settle their shoulders and gaze off at forty degrees to the camera axis whenever I attempted a semi-formal portrait. It was expected.

Emil Schildt
29-Apr-2015, 08:48
A Danish amateur photographer made some beautiful Autochromes around WWI....

I love the way this treats red.... and the muted greens...

Here's some examples...

(his name was MN Topp)

Emil Schildt
29-Apr-2015, 08:49
and more

Emil Schildt
29-Apr-2015, 08:50
last two..

Drew Wiley
29-Apr-2015, 08:51
Garrett - there are a couple of reasons people didn't smile. The exposures could be pretty damn long, for one thing; and for another, lots of the sitters didn't have
any teeth left!

bob carnie
29-Apr-2015, 08:56
these examples that all of you are showing , look very much like the prints I am making with tri colour over palladium..

the colour gamut is low, there is a matt texture.. I love this style .

Drew Wiley
29-Apr-2015, 09:36
Take your time experimenting with various pigment sets if you can, Bob. There will inevitably be some bellflops; but the end result would be choices, much like
Technicolor had when matching specific dyes to specific themes and sets. Hope I get a chance to experiment with some esoteric pigment options, but I'll be lucky
just to find time to color print at all anytime soon.

bob carnie
29-Apr-2015, 09:54
I am having fun..Right now using the Daniel Smith pigment sets... just finished a 30 print tri colour over palladium show for Contact.. Its a feature show which in this festival a very big deal for me.

Next commission is 40 images for a museum in Kentucky.. this show is a mixture of 20 tri colours over palladium and 20 single pigment for Dmax over pt palladium.

this new show is going to allow me to stretch my wings a bit.. I have been lucky to get these commissions and lots of projects in the future... I am finding good registration and channel blending and channel selection with the
right pigments the key... The base paper is always Arches Platine on aluminum. I may start stretching to other papers , I have a large selection of Crane Platinotype which I may use for my personal work.

I have been turned onto Kramer in NYC that apparently make great pigments..

StoneNYC
29-Apr-2015, 11:02
last two..

Love these last two, but all are truly exceptional! Especially for the time period, such even lighting and exposure, that last one is clever also, and all that's missing is that the painter didn't paint himself and the woman INTO the painting, now THAT would have been clever :)

Drew Wiley
29-Apr-2015, 11:21
Don't get too Photoshoppy, Stone. I did dumb luck bag a deliberate redux pictorialist shot on the beach not long ago, with some amateur plein-air painters and
their little easels propped up on the sand. What made this one work is that it was one of the rare instances I was carrying both fast-operating MF gear and soft
Portra film. The light was very soft and diffused, and one of the painters was a little old lady in exactly the right colors, a bonnet, and pretty much old-fashioned
looking clothes just like an old stereotypical Victorian shot of a painter, but anachronistically of course, with everyone else in the background in bikinis or whatever. A nice fun shot, if I ever get around to printing it.

Alan Gales
29-Apr-2015, 21:45
A Danish amateur photographer made some beautiful Autochromes around WWI....

I love the way this treats red.... and the muted greens...

Here's some examples...

(his name was MN Topp)

Emil, only you could find some autochrome nudes! ;)

Yes, they are beautiful. I recently posted some English autochromes in the lounge section. I wish autochromes were available today but they would probably cost a fortune to shoot.

StoneNYC
30-Apr-2015, 08:51
Emil, only you could find some autochrome nudes! ;)

Yes, they are beautiful. I recently posted some English autochromes in the lounge section. I wish autochromes were available today but they would probably cost a fortune to shoot.

Aren't they the kind of thing that you can easily make yourself? It's just potato starch and a few layers?

Drew Wiley
30-Apr-2015, 10:26
Well, not exactly instant mashed potatoes, Stone. There are a handful of people trying to re-invent the process in their own kitchen, so to speak. It seems they're
having a pretty hard time so far getting decent predictable results. I was after all a screen effect. You could do a search if you're really curious.

Alan Gales
30-Apr-2015, 21:00
Aren't they the kind of thing that you can easily make yourself? It's just potato starch and a few layers?

Stone, from my understanding Autochromes were made in a lab and it took a lot of man hours to make them. The potato starch had to be pressed with a machine using a lot of pressure to get even results. It's really a lost art.

StoneNYC
30-Apr-2015, 22:20
Stone, from my understanding Autochromes were made in a lab and it took a lot of man hours to make them. The potato starch had to be pressed with a machine using a lot of pressure to get even results. It's really a lost art.

Ahh! Ok, ah well...

Bill_1856
1-May-2015, 06:17
Not bad, for pictures made through a bag of potato chips.

fishbulb
1-May-2015, 08:17
last two..

Whoa whoa whoa, please mark as "not safe for work"! You can see that woman's elbow!!!

Seriously though, good stuff. Thanks for sharing!

chad23
3-May-2015, 08:52
Awesome
Thanks for sharing
I have no doubt about authenticity of these pictures but it just looks like vintage photo effect. :D