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Pfiltz
31-Jan-2015, 09:11
Found it quite pleasant, and refreshing.

http://vimeo.com/91495217

chuckcars
31-Jan-2015, 09:42
Very well done video. Thanks for sharing. Makes food for thought.

h2oman
31-Jan-2015, 21:26
Thanks, I enjoyed that. His commitment is commendable. His website (well, the platinum prints page) is worth a visit, in my opinion:

http://zenne-inc.com/

Pfiltz
1-Feb-2015, 05:46
Moderators.

Please remove the thread.

Bill_1856
1-Feb-2015, 07:06
Moderators.

Please remove the thread.

Don't you DARE!

cikaziva
1-Feb-2015, 07:10
Please DONT remove the tread! its really nice film and thanks for pointing it out!

brucetaylor
1-Feb-2015, 09:57
Fascinating. Beautifully shot documentary of a fellow who makes wonderful art. Inspirational- thanks for sharing.

Bernice Loui
1-Feb-2015, 10:54
Why ???


Bernice



Moderators.

Please remove the thread.

tgtaylor
1-Feb-2015, 11:26
Pfiltz - thanks again for posting this. I thought it was well worth my time to watch.

+1.

Thomas

Pfiltz
1-Feb-2015, 13:59
Hello all. I don't post a lot here, nor do I shoot the volume of LF as most. Never really have read rules/reg's about the forum. If the mod can change the title to what fits best per the rules... I'm cool with that.

I had never seen anyone that dedicated to photography to that extent and had to pass it on.

What I don't understand is why I can't edit my own threads.... or can I?

Sal Santamaura
1-Feb-2015, 14:37
...What I don't understand is why I can't edit my own threads.... or can I?You can, but only for a limited period of time. At this point, contact the moderators if you wish to have the thread title changed.

Will Whitaker
1-Feb-2015, 15:27
A beautifully produced video. You have to admire the videographer's craft! Great diversion for a rainy Sunday afternoon and so much better than football.

On a more mundane level... I was amused by the light stands and umbrellas. And, man, do I envy this guy's darkroom!!

rdenney
1-Feb-2015, 18:31
Moderators.

Please remove the thread.

Only if you insist; there is no need. I changed the title. Please use the report button when you need to contact us.

Rick "and, yes, we do request descriptive thread titles" Denney

Pali K
1-Feb-2015, 19:02
Beautiful and inspiring - thanks for posting!

Sal Santamaura
1-Feb-2015, 19:11
Nice work. However, since he's using a flatbed scanner, making digital negatives and then printing on very coarse-textured paper, I wonder why the need for 8x10. It seems a smaller negative would provide indistinguishable prints and be much easier to work with in the field.

Kirk Gittings
1-Feb-2015, 19:26
Nice work. However, since he's using a flatbed scanner, making digital negatives and then printing on very coarse-textured paper, I wonder why the need for 8x10. It seems a smaller negative would provide indistinguishable prints and be much easier to work with in the field.

its the thought that counts :)

Joe Smigiel
1-Feb-2015, 20:08
Nice. Thanks for posting the link.

Fred L
1-Feb-2015, 21:27
I wondered the same thing Sal as soon as I saw the scanner and the curves being applied. My guess is that while 4x5 would have been fine (esp considering the comments people made about him using such coarse washi paper), I think, and I'm taking a wild guess, is that the burden he undertakes using 8x10 is out of his respect for the places he photographs. He's humble before the gods if you will.

edit- he took copious meter readings and kept very detailed notes of the scene so I'm not following what that was for if he was going to make digital negatives.

FrankS
1-Feb-2015, 21:29
I was totally into the video and impressed with the guy, until he fired up the flatbed scanner. Such dedication for tradition in the other aspects of his process, it seemed out of place. If I were a god, I would not be pleased. ;)

richardman
1-Feb-2015, 22:02
Taking copious amount of notes do go with digital negatives. In fact, by scanning and doing digital neg, he can a) do all the dodging and burning he needs, and b) enlarge his prints beyond the contact size of 8x10, which he does do.

I think if you put down the preconceived notions of digital post processing workflow, you will see the beauty of his approach.

FrankS
1-Feb-2015, 22:12
Yeah, I just have a bias for non-electronic photography.

Will Whitaker
1-Feb-2015, 22:28
Besides, a scanner is not yubi.

macolive
1-Feb-2015, 22:28
Thanks for sharing! Amazing..so meticulous.

Andrew O'Neill
1-Feb-2015, 23:31
Besides, a scanner is not yubi.

Correction. It's yuubi (ゆうび), which means grace.  yubi (ゆび) means finger(s) ;)
There is nothing wrong with a hybrid approach. It presents more options to the artist.

Will Whitaker
1-Feb-2015, 23:53
Thanks for the clarification. It was 'fingers' in the video...

tgtaylor
1-Feb-2015, 23:54
Sometime back I bought Light "Goyu" Kozo paper from B&S but when I went to print it fell apart in the wash and used heavier papers. This excellent video has inspired me to try again. My alternative printing techniques have improved considerable since then and from watching how the paper is handled in the development and wash stages I think that I may now be able to process the paper keeping it in one piece. And the paper has aged a couple of years since I got it. Something in the video, though, about treating the paper with something to strengthen it.

Thomas

richardman
2-Feb-2015, 01:06
He said he used some kind of "resin" but may be Andrew O'Neill can tell us.

When I was in Japan last, I asked my native friend what's the pronunciation difference between sake the fish and sake the drink. He said something-something for one, and then something-something for the others, and then scratched the back of his head and said, "but may be it's the other way" :-)

I tend not to get "religious" about techniques and process. Whatever one does is fine. I will do what I think is best for me, and learn all I can on that path. What others prefer for themselves are their own choices.

h2oman
2-Feb-2015, 08:06
Yeah, I just have a bias for non-electronic photography.

Well, at least you recognize your bias and admit it!

FrankS
2-Feb-2015, 08:36
Well, at least you recognize your bias and admit it!

I'm both very aware and open about it. Everyone is free to choose what floats their boat.

The video shows a brilliant marriage of the old and the new, it just doesn't jive for me. It's like that sesame st song: One of these things just doesn't belong here, One of these things just isn't the same.
For me, after the LF photography and hand made paper, that thing, is the scanner.
But that's just me. YMMV

Joe Smigiel
2-Feb-2015, 08:51
But that's just me.

It's not just you. :)

Andrew O'Neill
2-Feb-2015, 13:05
Thanks for the clarification. It was 'fingers' in the video...

Really? I watched it again and paid attention to the subtitles. They wrote yubi, but with a dash over the u. which differentiates it from yubi (no dash)... it should be written yuubi when using English letters (romaji).
As for the pine resin, he doesn't say why he uses it. It was used however by Japanese and Chinese traditional painters as a thinner, as well as a dispersing agent for ink and paints... kinda like photo flo. It's also a good way to flatten down those pesky fibres in some of the washi papers. He is seen dabbing the edges of the paper, perhaps to prevent fraying and tearing.



I asked my native friend what's the pronunciation difference between sake the fish and sake the drink.

Richard, do you mean salmon? If written in romaji (English letters) it's: shake Very different from the drink, sake. I'd write it in Japanese (hiragana), but I'm on my stupid teacher pc and have no clue how to switch over to write in Japanese...

I haven't taught Japanese in a couple of years... I'm getting rusty!!

By the way, I tried contacting him by phone last night... got his answering machine. He was probably out shooting as it was in the wee hours there!

richardman
2-Feb-2015, 13:45
I see, all I have ever seen for salmon in Romanji is "sake". Thanks.

David R Munson
2-Feb-2015, 18:27
My dictionary gives me:

酒 さけ for the beverage
鮭 さけ、しゃけ for the fish

relatedly:
優美 ゆうび yūbi for the aesthetic term
and because it was mentioned 指 ゆび yubi for "finger" :)

Anyway, I really liked this video. I really appreciate his level of patience and the meticulous nature of his working method. I have no problem whatsoever with his use of the Epson scanner or the rough kozo paper. He uses the tools and methods that get him what he wants. That some of us would do it differently is beside the point entirely. I appreciate what he does and how he does it. I'll be watching this many more times, I think (I always watch any photographer documentary that I like many times over - I learn different things on repeat viewings).

Zndrson
2-Feb-2015, 22:21
I'll +1 the surprise at the digital element. Seems so much care is taken to keep things hand worked and natural. You've got a huge 8x10 negative to work with. If we're talking about a hybrid process it seems like it would make more sense to shoot 4x5 and then scan to print the larger digital negative.

Either way, really enjoyed the video and appreciated the introduction to a true artist. Love his philosophy and attention to detail.

David R Munson
2-Feb-2015, 22:57
But why would a hybrid process negate the use of an 8x10? And why should it matter to anyone other than him?

Sal Santamaura
2-Feb-2015, 23:37
But why would a hybrid process negate the use of an 8x10?...If he were drum scanning the negatives, outputting on an imagesetter after manipulation, then printing on silver paper, it wouldn't. But he's choking the image chain's "bandwidth" by using a flatbed scanner and printing on very coarsely textured paper. I percieve that as 'wasting' the capability of an 8x10. :)


...And why should it matter to anyone other than him?I only posted about it because it came to mind while viewing the complete video. In other words, as a comment in a forum. :) It clearly doesn't matter to him.

Zndrson
2-Feb-2015, 23:39
But why would a hybrid process negate the use of an 8x10? And why should it matter to anyone other than him?

Never said it should matter to other people. Everyone's giving their opinion about the video.

richardman
2-Feb-2015, 23:46
"If I want your opinions, I would give it to you." ;)

David R Munson
3-Feb-2015, 01:25
I understand the objections. I guess I just read some of the previous comments as crying foul or suggestion that he was doing it wrong. Nobody was rude about it or anything, I just find it curious the way some people react to other peoples' working methods.

For me, 8x10 is as much about the experience of the using an 8x10 camera (which is, to me, a different experience from working with 4x5) as it is about image quality. I don't see why shooting 8x10 has to mean either contact-printing or making huge prints. Or why scanning an 8x10 negative on an Epson is necessarily a waste, regardless of of the output.

But this is clearly a matter of philosophy. We care about different things. I didn't mean to ruffle any feathers, I'm just trying to better understand the basis for the nitpicking of his technique.

Also, for what it's worth, I've seen some excellent Pt/Pd prints on kozo from digital negatives and the image quality is still very good. It's not as if the combination of materials entirely obliterates detail.

Doug Howk
3-Feb-2015, 03:35
Very enjoyable video.
I personally do have a sense of discordance in his workflow. Its like a tea ceremony wherein the tea master uses a Lipton tea bag, or a Zen garden created with artificial rocks. Its discordant with the purity of the process and materials. But that's just me.

Rayt
3-Feb-2015, 03:40
Maybe he saves his 8x10 negs for other processes in the future not necessarily platinum? Maybe he prefers the narrow dof he gets with his lenses in that format? I have a feeling he knew what he was shooting for.

djdister
3-Feb-2015, 05:46
I would guess, just guess, that the contrast range and tonalities needed for his chosen output media could not have been achieved with a contact print from the original negative. It's that simple...

Bill_1856
3-Feb-2015, 08:05
Maybe he just likes the plate size and the focal length.
8x10 is probably the smallest (current) film size to be able to stand back and see both the overall composition and the details of the composition.

lecarp
3-Feb-2015, 08:49
He explains his camera choice in the video.

Thank you to the original poster for this video, it was very pleasant.

FrankS
3-Feb-2015, 10:26
I understand the objections. I guess I just read some of the previous comments as crying foul or suggestion that he was doing it wrong. Nobody was rude about it or anything, I just find it curious the way some people react to other peoples' working methods.

For me, 8x10 is as much about the experience of the using an 8x10 camera (which is, to me, a different experience from working with 4x5) as it is about image quality. I don't see why shooting 8x10 has to mean either contact-printing or making huge prints. Or why scanning an 8x10 negative on an Epson is necessarily a waste, regardless of of the output.

But this is clearly a matter of philosophy. We care about different things. I didn't mean to ruffle any feathers, I'm just trying to better understand the basis for the nitpicking of his technique.

Also, for what it's worth, I've seen some excellent Pt/Pd prints on kozo from digital negatives and the image quality is still very good. It's not as if the combination of materials entirely obliterates detail.

Crying foul, doing it wrong, nitpicking of his technique

My post was none of these. It does not matter to me how he chooses to do what he does, and I really enjoyed watching the video.

My post was only about my surprise.

I was simply making an observation that his philosophy as expressed in his working method, seemed inconsistent to me. It was a genuine surprise to me to see the scanner being used after all the emphasis on the previous traditional steps, and in his whole approach and explanation of his thoughts on his photography. To me, there is a discordance there.

Other than that, I admire his dedication.

Andrew O'Neill
3-Feb-2015, 11:27
I have to admit I was a bit surprised as well, as I was not expecting to see him in a lightroom... but I'm okay with it. Ten years ago I wouldn't have been. But over the past few years, I've opened my mind and can see the possibilites of a hybrid approach to making alt prints.
On another note, he hasn't returned my call... the nerve!!

tgtaylor
3-Feb-2015, 11:46
I can't be sure but I don't think that he is developing his negatives for the required contrast but relying on achieving that contrast in the digital negative. If that is indeed the case then he may also be using those negatives for silver gelatin printing. Note that the lens is mounted on a 4x5 lensboard and mounted on the camera using an adapter board. So my guess is that he has 4x5 cameras as well as the 810 GII.

Thomas

Doug Howk
3-Feb-2015, 12:18
Btw, the pine resin or rosin soak is I believe for sizing the paper. Side effect is that it lowers the ph.

Carl J
3-Feb-2015, 14:37
I can't be sure but I don't think that he is developing his negatives for the required contrast but relying on achieving that contrast in the digital negative. If that is indeed the case then he may also be using those negatives for silver gelatin printing. Note that the lens is mounted on a 4x5 lensboard and mounted on the camera using an adapter board. So my guess is that he has 4x5 cameras as well as the 810 GII.

Thomas

That GII over the shoulder must weigh a ton, not to mention along with his other gear. ;) Interesting choice of the monorail, though.

David R Munson
3-Feb-2015, 18:49
My post was none of these.

Never said it was. I'm glad you enjoyed the video - I did as well.

Andrew O'Neill
3-Feb-2015, 19:08
Btw, the pine resin or rosin soak is I believe for sizing the paper. Side effect is that it lowers the ph.

Really? The pine resin I used back in my lithography days was anywhere from ph 5 to 7… But even if it lowers the ph, isn't that a good thing? Platinum Palladium likes an acidic surface.

richardman
3-Feb-2015, 19:27
I am thinking Kobayashi-san knows that a wooden camera is less heavy, ditto with using 4x5" vs. 8x10, and I bet he has done contact printing with his 8x10. Heck, I would not be surprised if he has a 11x14 or other ULF in his studio... My point is that he is making very deliberate decisions on what he photographs, where, and how, and when. He must have a reason for every choices he makes.

tgtaylor
3-Feb-2015, 21:26
That GII over the shoulder must weigh a ton, not to mention along with his other gear. ;) Interesting choice of the monorail, though.

The GII is the heaviest Toyo of all (except for the Toyo 20x24 which I understand weighs in at a hefty 176 lbs.) thanks to the fancy control knobs. It’s about 2 lbs. heavier than the predecessor G model which I have. But you use what you have and he specifically mentions the importance of movements and the Toyo studio camera is capable of all the movements that your lenses are capable of delivering.

But I would suggest that instead of carrying the camera and tripod in one hand and the film holders in the other that he consider a backpack like the LowePro 650 AW which will carry the camera, lens, spot meter, etc., and 5 or 6 film holders along with the tripod. This would leave both hands free for hiking poles which I consider to be indispensable for maintaining balance in the tricky terrain as pictured in the video. From past experience I have found that it takes about 30 days for the body to full adjust to carrying heavy loads over rough terrain. Just a 1 millimeter “mistake” in the rise of the foot in stepping over an object is enough to cause you to stumble and loose balance and, without the hiking poles to arrest that stumble, you are in trouble.

Thomas

Greg Miller
5-Feb-2015, 09:08
I enjoyed to film. That said, and tastes will vary, I don't find the results all that special. I also find it interesting that only 24 platinum prints are shown on the web site - The film obviously took a large amount of effort to produce. Hopefully there are more than 24 prints to warrant such an effort. But, again, I don't find the results very special. I'm not really impressed with someone who works very hard but doesn't have the end result to justify that. I admire hard work, but that in itself if not enough to call them masterful photographs. And the film also seems to focus on the process and very little on the end results. After all that time spent showing the process, I really wanted to be blown away with the end result. And I did not get that.

Pfiltz
5-Feb-2015, 09:55
I don't find the results all that special.

I tend to agree somewhat. Having said that, maybe all the trouble he goes through is rewarding to him in a "spiritual" way, -vs- what a print may look like on the wall.

I shoot LF and MF for the pleasure of it. Not so much because I'm trying to create gallery prints, and trying to sell them for $$$$$$$.00.

Glad everyone has enjoyed the vid as well.

Footnote:... I saw him taking notes on some landscapes. Is this for just informational purposes, since he scanning neg's and creating digital files, -vs- printing from negs... Or maybe the shot where he was taking notes he did print from a neg. I wonder if his backend work varies depending on the shot, mood he's in, etc...

Bill_1856
5-Feb-2015, 10:27
I enjoyed to film. That said, and tastes will vary, I don't find the results all that special. I also find it interesting that only 24 platinum prints are shown on the web site - The film obviously took a large amount of effort to produce. Hopefully there are more than 24 prints to warrant such an effort. But, again, I don't find the results very special. I'm not really impressed with someone who works very hard but doesn't have the end result to justify that. I admire hard work, but that in itself if not enough to call them masterful photographs. And the film also seems to focus on the process and very little on the end results. After all that time spent showing the process, I really wanted to be blown away with the end result. And I did not get that.

+1

Doug Howk
5-Feb-2015, 11:11
Really? The pine resin I used back in my lithography days was anywhere from ph 5 to 7… But even if it lowers the ph, isn't that a good thing? Platinum Palladium likes an acidic surface.

I should have said a "side benefit" of pine resin sizing would be lowering the pH. From the tests I've seen published, Kozo is neutral to slightly alkaline.

h2oman
5-Feb-2015, 12:12
I enjoyed to film. That said, and tastes will vary, I don't find the results all that special. I also find it interesting that only 24 platinum prints are shown on the web site - The film obviously took a large amount of effort to produce. Hopefully there are more than 24 prints to warrant such an effort. But, again, I don't find the results very special. I'm not really impressed with someone who works very hard but doesn't have the end result to justify that. I admire hard work, but that in itself if not enough to call them masterful photographs. And the film also seems to focus on the process and very little on the end results. After all that time spent showing the process, I really wanted to be blown away with the end result. And I did not get that.

Agreed, although I found a few of the images on the website quite compelling. There were some images shown in the video that aren't on the website.

What I appreciate is that he was following his own muse, rather than just plugging tripod holes at various well-known locations. Or, being that he is in Japan, becoming a Michael Kenna of the 8x10 and platinum. :)

brucetaylor
5-Feb-2015, 12:54
I enjoyed to film. That said, and tastes will vary, I don't find the results all that special.

I find that comment a little odd, since we haven't actually seen the prints. I want to see with my own eyes what the object he creates looks like before I venture an opinion on the final work. In my experience there are often very interesting visual things that happen when high resolution images go through a process like printing on rough handmade paper.

Anyway, interesting stuff, I would love to see the work in person.

Greg Miller
5-Feb-2015, 12:58
I find that comment a little odd, since we haven't actually seen the prints. I want to see with my own eyes what the object he creates looks like before I venture an opinion on the final work. In my experience there are often very interesting visual things that happen when high resolution images go through a process like printing on rough handmade paper.

Anyway, interesting stuff, I would love to see the work in person.

I judge prints first by their artistic merit. Only if the print is of artistic merit, does the technical execution come into play (for me). That much I can tell from the film and the web site. The artistic merit just isn't there for me, so I don't need to see the print. There just isn't enough there for me to possibly change my mind if I hand the print in hand.

That's just me. Others, including Kobayashi-san, can have a different opinion and that OK too.

Rayt
6-Feb-2015, 03:05
Yes I understand the criticism. I don't like art that is process driven either unless it is to my taste. HDR is process driven for example and to me it is like glass in my eye balls. What about St. Ansel? I have heard plenty of photographers critique St. Ansel's work as purely technical, more craft than art. I disagree with that but what Ansel did is a process just happens to be a process I enjoy.

h2oman
6-Feb-2015, 07:56
art that is process driven

I don't understand what you mean.

Pete Suttner
6-Feb-2015, 08:46
Just for fun - compare and contrast with the work of Takashi Shikama.

Pete Suttner
6-Feb-2015, 09:00
Correction: Takeshi Shikama

Sal Santamaura
6-Feb-2015, 09:33
Just for fun - compare and contrast with the work of Takashi Shikama.


Correction: Takeshi ShikamaFYI, if you go to your first post, you should be able to edit it for that correction. Also, if you go to your first post and use the edit function, you can delete it, since you've corrected the first one.

:D

Zndrson
6-Feb-2015, 10:04
I don't understand what you mean.

Art that is bound by a chosen process - a Purely analog approach for example. If an "artist" has a concept he or she wants to convey it is their responsibility as an "artist" to communicate that idea in the most effective way possible. This could mean a painting would be the correct medium for a certain concept- even though the artist is more of a photographer.

If the the "Artist" chooses photography over painting even though the concept would be more effectively communicated in a different medium, then one could say that the art is "process driven" and is therefore has a ceiling limited by that medium. That's an extreme example, but valid.

Process driven could also refer to the art of many of us here - myself included. I, and I assume many others, love photography. Specifically, large format photography. Because of that passion for the medium and the technical experience it involves, we may produce a technically correct and impressive image, but in terms of "art", whatever that means, the images may be lacking.

Andrew O'Neill
6-Feb-2015, 10:13
I received an email from Mr. Kobayashi. Tonight I'll read through it...

Doug Howk
6-Feb-2015, 14:57
Just for fun - compare and contrast with the work of Takashi Shikama.

I looked at Takeshi's images on the web, and they seem to suffer from veiling soft grey. Are the images in his book "Silent Respiration of Trees" better? I realize Gampi is hard to digitize while retaining its unique characteristics; and wonder if book reproduction is any better.

h2oman
6-Feb-2015, 16:39
Art that is bound by a chosen process - a Purely analog approach for example. If an "artist" has a concept he or she wants to convey it is their responsibility as an "artist" to communicate that idea in the most effective way possible. This could mean a painting would be the correct medium for a certain concept- even though the artist is more of a photographer.

If the the "Artist" chooses photography over painting even though the concept would be more effectively communicated in a different medium, then one could say that the art is "process driven" and is therefore has a ceiling limited by that medium. That's an extreme example, but valid.

Process driven could also refer to the art of many of us here - myself included. I, and I assume many others, love photography. Specifically, large format photography. Because of that passion for the medium and the technical experience it involves, we may produce a technically correct and impressive image, but in terms of "art", whatever that means, the images may be lacking.

I still don't get it. Say I'm a sculptor who works in stone. I have a certain process I follow to make sculptures (which I suspect would be pretty much the same process that is followed by other stone sculptors). Is my art then process driven? It seems like any painter, sculptor, photographer, etc. would have some sort of process that they use to create their art (or non-art).

Moreover, it seems most folks choose a process, and then their art follows the process. They choose to pick up a saxophone, or a set of paintbrushes, or duck under a darkcloth. Some might change their medium/process after a point if they feel they are having trouble expressing themselves, but I doubt many change every time they want to express something.

I'm just thinking almost all art, and all photography (art or not), is "process driven."

I'd be curious to hear what the original poster of the phrase can tell us. I don't mean this in an argumentative manner. I understand the incongruence seen in the video, and understand why it is bothersome to some.

Pete Suttner
6-Feb-2015, 17:28
Maybe fidelity isn't the point. Different aesthetic. if you were to represent an animistic spiritual connection with nature and communicate it on paper what better way than with platinum palladium. I have heard that a good platinum print emanates it's own light. True on hard smooth papers. On translucent paper the light comes from all directions, behind, inside, and from the front. If a connection with the "gods" has been made and carried out through all the processes, capture to print, then maybe the medium is the message? Just guessing.

Zndrson
6-Feb-2015, 20:20
I don't really think anyone is saying that Plat/Pallad isn't the correct way to convey his message, but the digital element introduces a different look/more options than a "process driven" piece that is analog all the way.

bomzi
10-Feb-2015, 05:23
Lovely video and a great dedicated photographer.

Sal Santamaura
10-Feb-2015, 09:51
I received an email from Mr. Kobayashi. Tonight I'll read through it...So? What did he say? :D

Andrew O'Neill
17-Feb-2015, 11:04
We had a good chat. He's a very down to earth guy. His main film is TriX and he is concerned about its future availability. He uses pine resen to smooth out the paper's surface, and prevent chemicals from going right through. He feels it helps make the image more stable. He got the idea from traditional Japanese painters. The inks won't pass through the paper.
He has been working on a Portrait Project about the survivors of the 2011 Tsunami. All digital, mind you. Here is a video by NHK:


https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=an0QVIhlqPM

I'm planning on meeting him in summer 2017. Hopefully I'll get to see him at work in his studio, go out shooting, and trade prints.

Carl J
17-Feb-2015, 15:09
Nice update, Andrew. Thanks.

Andrew O'Neill
17-Feb-2015, 18:57
Asking him to become a member here...

Pfiltz
18-Feb-2015, 18:33
Asking him to become a member here...

That would be cool. ;)