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neil poulsen
24-Jan-2015, 13:14
Over the years, I've collected and sold a lot of gear. I'm left with a number of outfits and formats that I like having, and from which, I would not want to part. This includes many lenses, a few camera bodies, a good darkroom, etc.

But this prompted me to think, what are the absolute essentials in all of this? If I had to trim down to just the minimum, what must I retain to keep photography worthwhile? Otherwise, I might just as well not bother?

So, here are a few things that come to mind.

This might sound silly to some, but I would have to have a densitometer. Without this, I wouldn't know what I could expect from film, the actual film speed, and the development times for this or that situation. In trimming down, I would have to do B&W photography, and I would have to have a densitometer to get the results I wanted.

As for a camera, I think a 4x5 with bag bellows capability. For lenses, I would want the two focal lengths with which I began, which are 120mm wide field and a 180mm Plasmat. It would be be nice if this camera could have medium format capability. But, this would probably not be essential.

In the darkroom, I would want to keep my Zone VI developing and enlarging compensating timers. Fill in with anything else, but keep these two timers.

These would be included on my list, what would be included on yours? And, why? I think that hearing the different perspectives would be really instructive.

Heroique
24-Jan-2015, 13:26
These would be included on my list, what would be included on yours?

For landscape shooters who enjoy cross-country exploration, a sturdy and comfortable pair of hiking boots!

Also a dependable walking stick.

In my book, both are essential, esp. if you have creeks and slippery rocks to cross.

Old-N-Feeble
24-Jan-2015, 13:50
You seem to mean "absolute" essentials. I suppose for me that would be a lightweight 4x5 field camera, 90mm + 135-150mm + 203-210mm lenses, lightweight tripod, decent spot meter, dark cloth (anything to shade the GG), decent focusing loop, at least 2 DDS film holders, film, a way to process/print... or have processed/printed. I guess that's my minimum although, if I were to really push it I could do with one lens, one DDS and no meter.

IanG
24-Jan-2015, 14:04
The least important thing would be a densitometer. A 5x4 camera that can take 65mm to 300mm lenses with out needing to change bellows, that folds to a compact size, maybe can be used hand held. Good walking boots etc.

It's a US obsession needing a densitometer, practical Zone system test are far more valuable.

Ian

John Kasaian
24-Jan-2015, 14:58
I find this an interesting topic because I haven't shot 4x5 in years and I've been vetting through my 4x5 "stuff" as I thought I'd keep just the "essentials."

Ed Richards
24-Jan-2015, 15:17
I would add film holders to the list.:-)

Kirk Gittings
24-Jan-2015, 15:30
I have used on rare occasions, but never "absolutely needed" a densitometer*, but do need a light sturdy folding camera, a few filters to taste, a real light meter (not an iPhone or DSLR), dark cloth, lightest tripod that will do the job, wind break (a light disk), lens cloth and brush, changing tent, cable releases (with extra), loupe, "enough" lenses (5), "enough" film holders loaded (30 in the car every morning-8 in my bag), post it notes and pencil to mark dev/times on the film holders. This is not just my stripped down kit for hiking-it is my only kit.

*Picker's method of a proper proof works fine actually.

IanG
24-Jan-2015, 15:40
Essentials are a camera (5x4) with sufficient movements, Super Graphic is OK, a good 90mm and 135 or 150mm lens, luxury is a 203/210,and/ or wider 75mm/65mm, the camera must have a good bright screen. A dozen good DDS goes without saying.

Actually that's what I keep in Turkey, along with a Jobo 2000 dev tank and basic chemistry for film processing.

Ian

Taija71A
24-Jan-2015, 15:44
... *Picker's method of a proper proof works fine.

___

Speaking of the 'late' Fred Picker... I just spotted this:

http://www.parkersmithphoto.com/clientftp/docs/Printing%20with%20FredPicker.pdf

The old VHS Tape... Was of course much better.
But perhaps, some can still benefit from this information.
--
Best regards,

-Tim.
__________

Kirk Gittings
24-Jan-2015, 16:19
cool.I remember that.

Oren Grad
24-Jan-2015, 17:06
A lightweight, folding field camera with decent front rise, in a format large enough for reasonable contact printing. One lens, with a focal length about 7/8 of the format diagonal. A cable release. A bunch of holders. Anti-static brush for dusting film holders. A BTZS-style focusing hood. A small, featherweight incident meter. A not-too-heavy pack to carry the above. A sturdy tripod with a three-way pan/tilt head with a decently large platform, with enough weight that the setup with camera/lens/holder is not too top-heavy.

In the darkroom, I really, really, really like my Jobo for processing sheet film, though one could certainly say it's a luxury. If budget were tight, I'd go with Expert drums with a manual roller base, or BTZS-style tubes, home-made if necessary. An enlarger with a color head to use as a light source for contact printing on VC paper; a condenser enlarger with VC filters would do if budget were extremely tight. Two pieces of glass, one thin and one thick, to sandwich the negative and paper for printing. Safelight, timer, trays for processing and washing paper, tongs, mixing utensils, the usual basic darkroom incidentals.

I'm probably forgetting something, especially the smaller incidentals, but basically I think that should do it. I like my toys, and I'm fortunate to have a rather more elaborate outfit than this. But I could be very happy with just the above.

Bruce Barlow
24-Jan-2015, 17:20
cool.I remember that.

Me, too...

mdarnton
24-Jan-2015, 17:50
I'm having a lot of fun with 4x5 and 8x10 right now, but if I had to ditch stuff, I'd keep my 5x7 Ansco view, 300/6.3 Paragon, 190/4.5 Raptar, and a 108mm or 115mm, of which I have several to choose from and no strong preference at this time, cable release, holders, projector lens I use for a magnifier, the original Ansco tripod, and a small rolling hardshell suitcase. Some hangers and tanks, a thermometer and my red bulb. That might do it. As it is turning out, that would pretty much mimic my 35mm kit of choice, too.

Ari
24-Jan-2015, 18:03
Bare minimum?
Toyo 8x10 and Cooke XVa, a few holders, my favourite tripod, and a lifetime supply of HP5.
I could ditch the rest, which isn't much; it would all fit in a large suitcase.

Why keep those things?
If I were forced to work in only one discipline, it would be portraiture.
Nothing else really matters, except to say "I was here, and this is who was important to me."

Alan Gales
24-Jan-2015, 18:11
If I were forced to work in only one discipline, it would be portraiture.
Nothing else really matters, except to say "I was here, and this is who was important to me."

Then all most people really need is their iphone for selfies. ;)

Ari
24-Jan-2015, 18:30
Then all most people really need is their iphone for selfies. ;)

We're not most people. :)

Old-N-Feeble
24-Jan-2015, 18:36
We're not most people. :)

Some of us can't get out much anymore and have no one else around anymore.;)

Alan Gales
24-Jan-2015, 18:36
We're not most people. :)

Thank God! :)

Alan Gales
24-Jan-2015, 18:42
Some of us can't get out much anymore and have no one else around anymore.;)

Here you go! http://www.artnet.com/artists/francesca-woodman/

Randy
24-Jan-2015, 18:52
Zombie apocalypse type essentials...my old Nikon F2 and Nikkor 35mm f/2. But as for my large format gear I'll keep my 8X10 and one lens, probably Componon 300mm.

diversey
24-Jan-2015, 19:06
One camera
One lens
One film holder
One reliable film and chemical supply company

mdm
24-Jan-2015, 19:26
It interesting, I have been thinking about this too. I would choose my 5x7 and a 210, but if you expect to make many many photos, say 2000 a year a 4x5 with a 135 seems hard to beat for reasons of economy. Looking at the results achieved by really great photographers with mf and smaller it seems hard to justify larger formats, except I can't get excited about using anything but sheet film, so maybe 4x5 is the sweet spot. And I am very surprised to come to that conclusion.

Alan Gales
24-Jan-2015, 19:54
It interesting, I have been thinking about this too. I would choose my 5x7 and a 210, but if you expect to make many many photos, say 2000 a year a 4x5 with a 135 seems hard to beat for reasons of economy. Looking at the results achieved by really great photographers with mf and smaller it seems hard to justify larger formats, except I can't get excited about using anything but sheet film, so maybe 4x5 is the sweet spot. And I am very surprised to come to that conclusion.

No, 8x10 is the sweet spot. It's the largest negative that will fit an Epson flat bed scanner and 8x10 also makes nice size contact prints. ;)

I suppose everyone has their own sweet spot!

Old-N-Feeble
24-Jan-2015, 20:17
Here you go! http://www.artnet.com/artists/francesca-woodman/

??? Woodman committed suicide.

Alan Gales
24-Jan-2015, 20:32
??? Woodman committed suicide.

Yes, she committed suicide. She was alone a lot due to her depression so she took photographs of herself.


The point I'm trying to make is that if you can't get out, there are still things you can photograph like self portraits, still lifes and maybe pixies. :)

Old-N-Feeble
24-Jan-2015, 21:01
Yes, she committed suicide. She was alone a lot due to her depression so she took photographs of herself.


The point I'm trying to make is that if you can't get out, there are still things you can photograph like self portraits, still lifes and maybe pixies. :)

I can promise you with no hesitations that no one will want to see portraits of me.;) Sometime this coming week I'll be taking at least one photo.:D

John Kasaian
24-Jan-2015, 21:23
Hmmmm.....for several years I did nicely with just my 8x10, a 14" Commercial Ektar, tripod, three film holders, an Agfa 9x loupe, an Adams light meter that, IIRC didn't work very well, a small but heavy glass end-table top from a Pier 1, a cable release that was iffy about tripping the big No.5 Universal until I replaced it with a Gepe Pro, dark cloth my bride sewed for me, a couple of GE Guide Lamps(amber plug in nite lights) some cheap trays, a Kodak Exposure guide, four empty Robitussin glass jugs, a graduate, a plastic funnel, a Kodak stirring paddle, some clothes line and wooden clothes pins, a blotter book, a package of glassines, and a Mark Time timer (the trays, GE Guide Lamps, Agfa loupe and Mark Time were left over from college.)
I could go back to that if I had to, but light box, dry mount press, Versa lab print washer, and Gralab timer, a decent light meter, a short string of red led Christmas lights(replacing the GE Guide Lamps) and a Printfile contact proofer(which replaced the glass table top) eventually joined the circus as part of my annual "kit up grades" and have proved their usefulness.

Alan Gales
24-Jan-2015, 22:20
I can promise you with no hesitations that no one will want to see portraits of me.;) Sometime this coming week I'll be taking at least one photo.:D

I know what you mean. Every time I look in the mirror I have less gray hair. The problem is that all my hair is gray. I was always short (5'-8") but now I'm a short, fat, balding fellow.

A friend of mine complains that he has hair growing everywhere except the top of his head. ;)

Old-N-Feeble
24-Jan-2015, 22:24
^^^ Ha ha... I know exactly what you mean.:)

When I go out to take a photo in the next few days I'll be carrying a whole slew of lenses. But FWIW, I'll only use one... the "essential" one.:D

Alan Gales
24-Jan-2015, 22:26
Hmmmm.....for several years I did nicely with just my 8x10, a 14" Commercial Ektar, tripod, three film holders, an Agfa 9x loupe, an Adams light meter that, IIRC didn't work very well, a small but heavy glass end-table top from a Pier 1, a cable release that was iffy about tripping the big No.5 Universal until I replaced it with a Gepe Pro, dark cloth my bride sewed for me, a couple of GE Guide Lamps(amber plug in nite lights) some cheap trays, a Kodak Exposure guide, four empty Robitussin glass jugs, a graduate, a plastic funnel, a Kodak stirring paddle, some clothes line and wooden clothes pins, a blotter book, a package of glassines, and a Mark Time timer (the trays, GE Guide Lamps, Agfa loupe and Mark Time were left over from college.)
I could go back to that if I had to, but light box, dry mount press, Versa lab print washer, and Gralab timer, a decent light meter, a short string of red led Christmas lights(replacing the GE Guide Lamps) and a Printfile contact proofer(which replaced the glass table top) eventually joined the circus as part of my annual "kit up grades" and have proved their usefulness.

If I had to, I could probably get by with just my 14" Commercial Ektar. My other lenses are nice though.

Doremus Scudder
25-Jan-2015, 05:54
Lightweight 4x5 folding field camera with at least 300mm of bellows and shift.
Small 90mm 135mm 200-ish lenses (maybe a longer one too, like a 300mm on a top-hat board)
Lightweight tripod and head
Spot meter, filters, cable releases and a loupe
Holders with one B&W film (I like Tri-X)
Trays, chemicals and a ticking clock to develop with.
A 4x5 enlarger, trays and washer to print with.
Dry-mount press and board to mount with.
Misc. small stuff to go with the above.
Darkroom of some kind that allows me to make at least 16x20 prints.

This is my list of essentials. I can do all the Zone System tests without a densitometer, I can shuffle well enough not to need a Jobo, and I can use/repurpose other things for darkcloth, graduates, etc.

For me, 4x5 is really the sweet spot between portability, negative size and movement capability.

I have more cameras, enlargers and other stuff than I've listed, of course, but 95% of my work (maybe even more) could be done with only these items. I do like my Zone VI compensating timer, but do without one in Europe just fine (where I do indeed use a ticking clock or metronome plus an oven timer to develop film with). And, I really like my Zone VI viewing filter, but can do equally well with a rectangular hole in a card if need be.

Strangely, many of the things that I deem real time savers or extremely useful are very small: my viewing filter, a great pair of 4x reading glasses, a lipstick brush, a yellow LED flashlight for the darkroom, etc. These things take up little space. The big item on my list is a darkroom to work in. I am fortunate to have one now, but worked in reconfigured bathrooms and rented darkrooms for years and could again.

I could pare down the list a bit more if needed, to just the camera, a 135mm lens, tripod, meter, a few filters, etc. for the taking end of things and still pretty much feel gratified.

Best,

Doremus

Jim Jones
25-Jan-2015, 07:55
A 1957 video showed Ansel Adams loading this kit into an ancient 8-passenger Cadillac limousine with a 5x9 platform on the top:

1 8x10 view camera with 20 holders and 4 lenses: Cooke convertable, 10" Wide Field Ektar, 9" Dagor, 6.75 wide angle Wollansak

7x17 special panoramic camera with five holders & 13.5" Protar lens

4x5 view camera (Calumet?) with six lenses: 12" Voigtlander Collinear in Compound shutter, 8.5" Apo-Lanthar, 9.5" f/9 C. P. Goertz Am. Opt. Co. Apo-Artar in Ilex Synchro shutter, 9.25" Apo Tessar, 4" Wide Field Ektar, Dallmeyer 8-on telephoto

Hassleblad camera with 38, 60, 80, 135, and 200mm lenses

Contaflex 35mm camera outfit

Two Polaroid cameras

Filters for each camera: K1, K2, Minus Blue, G, X1, A, C5, B, F, 85B, 85C and light balancing series 81 & series 82

SEI exposure meter and two Weston meters

Two tripods; one light (Tiltall?), one heavy

Lens brush, Stop watch, level, thermometer, focusing magnifier, & focusing cloth

Heicolight strobe portrait outfit with 200' cable

Special storage box for film

Ancient Cadillac Eight passenger limousine with 5x9 platform on top

Michael R
25-Jan-2015, 08:24
Tough question, but the original premise is an interesting one in that I'd have to ask myself what really makes it "worthwhile" (OP's word) to me. In the end it is about art for me, and a lot of the gear is about putting as much technical quality as possible into the art. If I dispensed with that, I could surely get rid of some things. I'd use one wide angle lens and crop everything as required in the darkroom, forget about the compendium shade, filters etc. Actually the more I think about it, I could simply dispense with large format altogether, use my 35mm camera and be quite happy. If you work carefully there is a lot of quality to be had out of 35mm.

Most of the stuff I've accumulated has more to do with the darkroom than the camera, so I suppose another approach could be to get a bigger camera and only make contact prints. Something like that. Regarding the densitometer, as someone who loves his and uses it a lot for scientific-type work, it would probably be the first thing to go. It is one of the least useful things for practical work. Densitometer or not, virtually nobody ends up with the negatives they think they are making. Studying sensitometry, tone reproduction and exposure theory is fascinating on its own, but among other things it shows you that the transition from subject to print is complex, that the control you think you have over the negative is actually relatively limited, that most current films produce virtually the same tonality, etc. Printing (for us darkroom workers) is where most of the power is anyway.

John Kasaian
25-Jan-2015, 09:10
A 1957 video showed Ansel Adams loading this kit into an ancient 8-passenger Cadillac limousine with a 5x9 platform on the top:

1 8x10 view camera with 20 holders and 4 lenses: Cooke convertable, 10" Wide Field Ektar, 9" Dagor, 6.75 wide angle Wollansak

7x17 special panoramic camera with five holders & 13.5" Protar lens

4x5 view camera (Calumet?) with six lenses: 12" Voigtlander Collinear in Compound shutter, 8.5" Apo-Lanthar, 9.5" f/9 C. P. Goertz Am. Opt. Co. Apo-Artar in Ilex Synchro shutter, 9.25" Apo Tessar, 4" Wide Field Ektar, Dallmeyer 8-on telephoto

Hassleblad camera with 38, 60, 80, 135, and 200mm lenses

Contaflex 35mm camera outfit

Two Polaroid cameras

Filters for each camera: K1, K2, Minus Blue, G, X1, A, C5, B, F, 85B, 85C and light balancing series 81 & series 82

SEI exposure meter and two Weston meters

Two tripods; one light (Tiltall?), one heavy

Lens brush, Stop watch, level, thermometer, focusing magnifier, & focusing cloth

Heicolight strobe portrait outfit with 200' cable

Special storage box for film

Ancient Cadillac Eight passenger limousine with 5x9 platform on top
HEY! I'm as old as that Caddy. Who are you callin' ancient?:mad: :o

John Kasaian
25-Jan-2015, 09:21
If I had to, I could probably get by with just my 14" Commercial Ektar. My other lenses are nice though.
I hear you! Nearly each lens of mine plays a role in the drama. Without the entire cast there are shots that would have likely escape me----I think this would be more evident with landscapes.
According to the Ansel Adam's list he had four lenses with one being a triple convertible---that's six focal lengths!

Ed Richards
25-Jan-2015, 10:12
I cannot remember if it was Picker or Adams who said that you should start with a 4x5 field camera and a 121 (now 120/115/110) and a 210. While I am partial to extreme wides, I shot for a while with just a 120 when all my other lenses were stolen. Except for some interiors, I suspect I could do most everything with these two, and the discipline might be good.

Ari
25-Jan-2015, 11:10
I cannot remember if it was Picker or Adams who said that you should start with a 4x5 field camera and a 121 (now 120/115/110) and a 210. While I am partial to extreme wides, I shot for a while with just a 120 when all my other lenses were stolen. Except for some interiors, I suspect I could do most everything with these two, and the discipline might be good.

I did that for three months, and it was great; and yes, those two FLs cover 95% of situations on 4x5.

Alan Gales
25-Jan-2015, 11:39
I cannot remember if it was Picker or Adams who said that you should start with a 4x5 field camera and a 121 (now 120/115/110) and a 210. While I am partial to extreme wides, I shot for a while with just a 120 when all my other lenses were stolen. Except for some interiors, I suspect I could do most everything with these two, and the discipline might be good.

I shoot 4x5 for color with a reduction back. I recently sold my 90mm because it was sitting. I own the 121mm f/8 Schneider and a 250mm f/6.7 Fujinon. They are a nice combination.

For 8x10 I own the 250 Fujinon again and a 19" Artar (480mm) which is close to the same combination as I use for 4x5.

Then mainly for portraiture I have the 14" Commercial Ektar and a 305mm Kodak Portrait lens that I just picked up.

Lenny Eiger
25-Jan-2015, 13:30
Context.

I bring very little, a normal lens and one extra a little longer if I can't get close enough. A few holders - I don't shoot two of everything, after 50 years I am confident that I can expose and develop properly for each shot.

Back to context. i find that it is most important to know who you are. What do you like to photograph? What is it about what you are looking at that makes you want to point the camera there? Have you understood something? Will you like this shot after you develop it? Will anyone else see it? And most importantly, what genre of photography do you live in? Which one feels like a comfortable old friend?

Equipment is plenty of fun, but understanding what you are doing is the only way to increase the number of images you will keep. It requires study of the history and study of your own work to figure out what makes you tick, and be able to focus more directly on that...


Lenny

Randy
25-Jan-2015, 18:22
Lenny, I have never heard this before. I am going to have to read it several more times and then contemplate...but thank you.


Context.

I bring very little, a normal lens and one extra a little longer if I can't get close enough. A few holders - I don't shoot two of everything, after 50 years I am confident that I can expose and develop properly for each shot.

Back to context. i find that it is most important to know who you are. What do you like to photograph? What is it about what you are looking at that makes you want to point the camera there? Have you understood something? Will you like this shot after you develop it? Will anyone else see it? And most importantly, what genre of photography do you live in? Which one feels like a comfortable old friend?

Equipment is plenty of fun, but understanding what you are doing is the only way to increase the number of images you will keep. It requires study of the history and study of your own work to figure out what makes you tick, and be able to focus more directly on that...


Lenny

Ironage
26-Jan-2015, 07:26
I have been contemplating this for over a decade, and been playing around with equipment and processes and having fun ever since, but eventually desire to pare down to absolute minimum for use while traveling the continent in a RV. This is my retirement plan for a few years!

My absolute necessity is to do my own lab work. I hate sending anything out.

1 lightweight 5x7 camera.
240mm lens (still working on which one, but small and light and fast for shallow depth of field in portraits)
2 film holders.
focusing cloth.
Berlibach Reporter Tripod with no head.
1 box of 5x7 Tri-X
2 5x7 trays.
1 Paterson orbital processor
1 kodak tray thermometer.
1 250ml graduate
2 film clips
Bottle of Rodinal
1 liter bottle of TF-4 fixer
1 5x7 contact printing frame
Chemicals for Platinotypes
5x7 water color paper
A little storage bin to put it all.

I'm not there yet because I got sidetracked with a super deal on a nice medium format color enlarger and having a great time playing around in the darkroom, and trying out medium format cameras. eBay doesn't help me!

John Kasaian
26-Jan-2015, 10:07
I have been contemplating this for over a decade, and been playing around with equipment and processes and having fun ever since, but eventually desire to pare down to absolute minimum for use while traveling the continent in a RV. This is my retirement plan for a few years!

My absolute necessity is to do my own lab work. I hate sending anything out.

1 lightweight 5x7 camera.
240mm lens (still working on which one, but small and light and fast for shallow depth of field in portraits)
2 film holders.
focusing cloth.
Berlibach Reporter Tripod with no head.
1 box of 5x7 Tri-X
2 5x7 trays.
1 Paterson orbital processor
1 kodak tray thermometer.
1 250ml graduate
2 film clips
Bottle of Rodinal
1 liter bottle of TF-4 fixer
1 5x7 contact printing frame
Chemicals for Platinotypes
5x7 water color paper
A little storage bin to put it all.

I'm not there yet because I got sidetracked with a super deal on a nice medium format color enlarger and having a great time playing around in the darkroom, and trying out medium format cameras. eBay doesn't help me!
Wouldn't you want 8x10 trays for 5x7 format?

bob carnie
26-Jan-2015, 10:11
I would not get rid of any of my darkroom gear.....Essential for my well being.

Sound system and lots of thomas safelights to bath me in the golden glow, while I print and listen to Blues, Rock and Motown

No jazz or classical for this Boy

Bruce Barlow
26-Jan-2015, 11:38
I cannot remember if it was Picker or Adams who said that you should start with a 4x5 field camera and a 121 (now 120/115/110) and a 210. While I am partial to extreme wides, I shot for a while with just a 120 when all my other lenses were stolen. Except for some interiors, I suspect I could do most everything with these two, and the discipline might be good.

Picker.

StoneNYC
26-Jan-2015, 12:15
Here you go! http://www.artnet.com/artists/francesca-woodman/

Oh she's cool! I've never heard of her but I'm glad you have this is some neat work.

Alan Gales
27-Jan-2015, 10:59
Oh she's cool! I've never heard of her but I'm glad you have this is some neat work.

I have heard that many young aspiring photographers today ask their instructors about her at photography school.

Francesca Woodman was definitely ahead of her time.

Jmarmck
27-Jan-2015, 11:25
camera of choice
film of choice
dark room or changing bag
developer of choice and fixer of choice with lotsa water
daylight developing tank and reels
lenses, hmmm probably a slight wide and a mid tele though I like playing with the medium wides.
film holders, at least 2 the fewer holder the more important is a changing bag or a dark room.
dark cloth
cable release
tripod, lightweight
loupe, though not necessary
spot light meter
one red, one yellow, one green, one orange filters
a vehicle
marker, pencil, scissors, string, cloths pins, tape (maybe more that one kind)
someway to clean, store, and carry all this stuff

from there decide on either scanning or silver printing

When I was traveling I had two tripods in the bathroom holding up the string and cloths pins.

mdm
27-Jan-2015, 12:40
Camera lens tripod film holders Harrison changing tent btzs tubes contact printing frame tray clothes pins and string film water chems thermometer incident light meter cable release. Digital is much less trouble, camera, lens, memory card, much more boring.