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View Full Version : 31 rolls from WW 2 discoverd and processed.



ShannonG
17-Jan-2015, 09:48
Some really cool stuff here,,I would of liked to develop these.un processed film from 70 ish years ago and still holding strong....enjoy
http://petapixel.com/2015/01/16/31-rolls-undeveloped-film-soldier-wwii-discovered-processed/

rwhb1
18-Jan-2015, 07:26
Some really cool stuff here,,I would of liked to develop these.un processed film from 70 ish years ago and still holding strong....enjoy
http://petapixel.com/2015/01/16/31-rolls-undeveloped-film-soldier-wwii-discovered-processed/

Thanks for this link.

Russ

Jac@stafford.net
18-Jan-2015, 09:35
It is very interesting that he focused upon the troops as large groups as if he were concerned about the collective, and perhaps himself as separate (the later inferred from his letter.) All the photos I did in-service were of a few people at a time, usually under periods of no duress. My peers did the same. The difference of point-of-view is intriguing.

Keith Fleming
18-Jan-2015, 11:37
As a retired military historian, I think Jac is right on target. These photos seem to taken at the end of the war during the mass movement of American troops back to the States for demobilization. Some of the photos are of Europe, then a troop ship loaded with soldiers, and then an installation in the States (Fort Indiantown Gap?) where the soldiers were processed for discharge. The solders came back to the US not as part of their own familiar unit, but as individuals in a large anonymous crowd joined together only for the trip home. The photographer was aware something big was occurring (notice the vessel with the "welcome home" sign alongside the troopship). These photos are by someone part of the process but not surrounded by friends with whom he had served. The lines of soldiers and the all-important telephone centers for calling home remind me of my experience in an early-1960's replacement draft headed for the 3rd Marine Division on Okinawa, and the similar return by troopship 13 months year later.

That collection of images is part of the larger story captured so well in the immediate-post-war film "The Best Years of Our Lives." It's a truly an historically important collection of images. The Army's national museum or historical office would love to have those images in its collections.

Keith

Louis Pacilla
19-Jan-2015, 12:19
Thanks for sharing.

Here is the link to the Rescued Film Projects official site. http://www.rescuedfilm.com/

koh303
21-Jan-2015, 06:47
Its a miracle this guy gets any images at all on his "rescued" films. From the video it seems he really does not know what he is doing, but hey, whats the big deal, something came out of the D76 for 7 minutes....