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Dan Quan
1-Jan-2015, 10:44
I will be exploring new papers over the next few months and I am looking for exciting recommendations. Currently I am printing on an Epson 3880 and using Epson Exhibition Fibre and Epson Ultra Premium Luster, and I like each for different reasons. But the time has come to explore new papers so I am buying 2 sample packs; a Hahnemuhle Matte Fine Art Smooth and a Hahnemuhle Matte FineArt Textured.

This takes me back to the thread title and original question; what's your favourite B&W inkjet paper and why?

Thanks for your time.

:)

Jess C
12-Mar-2015, 18:19
I have done a lot of printing on my 3880 and I prefer Canson's Baryta paper for my black and white. It's as close to silver gelatin photographic paper as I have had the pleasure of using. Epson Exhibition is good and some of Hahnemuhle offerings are excellent but for me the Canson's does me good.

Paul Cunningham
12-Mar-2015, 18:26
Canson Baryta is impressive stuff, and hefty as well. At the moment I prefer matte papers such as Epson Velvet Fine Art and Red River Aurora Natural.

Peter De Smidt
12-Mar-2015, 18:30
I like a carbon pigment ink set on Epson Hot Press Natural, a cotton paper without brighteners. With an Eboni ink based inkset, it gives a slightly warm tone, and the dmax is fine for a matte paper.

angusparker
12-Mar-2015, 18:42
I will be exploring new papers over the next few months and I am looking for exciting recommendations. Currently I am printing on an Epson 3880 and using Epson Exhibition Fibre and Epson Ultra Premium Luster, and I like each for different reasons. But the time has come to explore new papers so I am buying 2 sample packs; a Hahnemuhle Matte Fine Art Smooth and a Hahnemuhle Matte FineArt Textured.

This takes me back to the thread title and original question; what's your favourite B&W inkjet paper and why?

Thanks for your time.

:)

I have only used about five different papers on my Epson 3880 but really like the Hahnemuhle Matte Fine Art Smooth - see how you like it.

paulr
12-Mar-2015, 18:53
I got 3:

Hahnemuhle Photo Rag for matte,

Harman/Hahnemuhle Baryta and Canson Baryta for gloss.

Of the last two, I print on the Harman/hahnemuhle on my own printer (17" max), and when I have big prints made for me, I have my printmaker use the Canson.
I find the papers equally good. I like the look of the harman/hahnemuhle surface more; but the surface is fragile, the paper tends to curl, and it's generally more of a pain in the ass.

People who make big prints professionally generally won't put up with the kind of problems the Harman/Hahnemuhle offers, so the Canson's an easy choice for them.

One thing I like about the Harman/Hahnemuhle is that it's available in 17x25." This is a great size for anyone working with a 1.5:1 aspect ratio. I'm surprised it's not more popular.

Darin Boville
12-Mar-2015, 19:45
For what it is worth, I use Canson Edition Etching for color and B&W (with Piezography inks).

--Darin

mdarnton
12-Mar-2015, 20:40
Hahnemuhle Photo Rag Pearl. It's the closest I've found to the old Kodak J-surface, or glossy-dried-matte. It has more texture than either of those, but to me the texture looks "real", where other inkjet textures look like they've been stamped into plastic. It looks like leather; the others look like pleather. Also, it's like a triple-weight silver paper, thick and like museum board, rather than like hard plastic, and the surface feels like a real gelatin surface, not, again, like plastic. Most of the popular premium papers feel and look like cheap plastic to me, front and back.

paulr mentions the fragile Hanemuhle surface. What I realized about that was that the surface itself is very durable, but in printing it picks up a skin of ink overspray that is very tender. Consequently, the stuff starts looking like it's got greasy fingerprint smudges all over it very soon. What I discovered was that you can use odorless paint thinner and a paper towel to wipe off this scum, and then you get a really durable surface. When you try it the first time do an experiment and scrub harder than you dare on a good print, with thinner and cheap paper towels--you'll see that the surface really does not scratch easily at all and is very tough. . . once the scum is gone. From there on, the prints look great and stay great.

The other thing about it is that on my printer I need to put a bit of a reverse curl on just the ends over the edge of my desk, on the leading and trailing edges, or it won't feed right and can pick up ink blots from something inside the printer. But that's relatively painless for the reward.

All of this is probably too much bother for production printing, but I'm not doing production printing.

bob carnie
13-Mar-2015, 06:06
Lately I have been using Hahnemuhle Museum Etching... lovely paper looks for colour and BW.

paulr
13-Mar-2015, 10:10
paulr mentions the fragile Hanemuhle surface.

I've noticed different issues with the matte and baryta surfaces. The trouble I've had with the matte are that little bits of it flake off, and if you don't thoroughly brush it before printing, you get white spots. The surface also tends to transfer ink to anything it brushes agains, and it scuffs very easily, giving a slight sheen to the scuffed areas. My only experience is with the original PhotoRag surface.

With the Baryta paper, the issue is that it scratches extremely easily. The scratches are extremely fine, and only visible on close inspection with light coming from the right angle. But they're there, and can be caused by almost anything. Woking with moderate sized prints at home I can deal with this issue, but it's murder for people dealing with roll paper in a professional environment. The Canson surface is a lot harder to scratch. Although I don't like the way it looks quite as much.

djdister
13-Mar-2015, 10:25
I got 3:

Hahnemuhle Photo Rag for matte,

Harman/Hahnemuhle Baryta and Canson Baryta for gloss.

Of the last two, I print on the Harman/hahnemuhle on my own printer (17" max), and when I have big prints made for me, I have my printmaker use the Canson.
I find the papers equally good. I like the look of the harman/hahnemuhle surface more; but the surface is fragile, the paper tends to curl, and it's generally more of a pain in the ass.

People who make big prints professionally generally won't put up with the kind of problems the Harman/Hahnemuhle offers, so the Canson's an easy choice for them.

One thing I like about the Harman/Hahnemuhle is that it's available in 17x25." This is a great size for anyone working with a 1.5:1 aspect ratio. I'm surprised it's not more popular.

I've noted this elsewhere, but as much as I love the surface of the Harman by Hahnemuhle gloss baryta paper, it has too much curl (and not just at the edges) to work well in my Epson 3880. I've tried messing with the platen gap and all that, but still too problematic. All those head strikes are going to shorten the lifespan of the printhead, and since there are other papers that are flatter out there, I won't use it anymore.

Lenny Eiger
13-Mar-2015, 10:45
OP, you haven't given us enough info. What kind of prints do you want to make?

For me, I would never consider printing on a luster paper. I don't like it at all. Other people absolutely love it and wouldn't print on anything else.

I like a "clean" look, where everything is sharp, but others like a warmer, more natural look. They don't mind some texture. A lot of it has to do with the aesthetics you have in mind.

That said, I have two papers I like are Hahnemuhle Photo Rag 308 and Kozo. The Kozo is a Japanese paper made from mulberry bushes, washed thoroughly in a process that's thousands of years old. The right weight of this is translucent and prints can be luminescent, when you get it just right... It's my latest passion...

Lenny

Michael Rosenberg
13-Mar-2015, 12:12
I prefer Canson Baytra. It has a warmer/neutral base than the Harmon. There is a gloss differential on the paper, most noticeable on high key prints. But once in a frame you don't see it.

To remove paper curl I heat it up in my dry mount press and then let it cool under a weight - perfectly flat.

Mike

John Bowen
13-Mar-2015, 14:09
My darkroom work leans heavily toward Azo/Amidol. For inkjet I like Cone Type 2 (matte) with Cone Warm Neutral inks

Gary Tarbert
14-Mar-2015, 04:13
Canson Platine works well for B&W prints IMHO .

Jim Andrada
15-Mar-2015, 18:43
Museo Silver Rag - I used to use the Epson Exhibition glossy papers but I think the Museo has a "richer" appearance.

Eric Biggerstaff
15-Mar-2015, 18:53
I love Canson Platine Fiber Rag, get a few sample packs from different companies and play around.

Colin Graham
15-Mar-2015, 19:59
I like Moab Entrada Natural 190GSM for matte. Nice smooth texture and a durable surface that holds detail well. Paper color isn't too warm, looks nice with both neutral and warmish inks but probably wouldn't want to go too far one way or the other. The surface and color reminds me a lot of Bergger COT320, which is a great alt process paper, but the color of the Entrada is maybe a little warmer. It portrays blacks well, deep shadows hold separation without a lot of profile heroics, curve tweaking, or it going all sooty. These are all very subjective impressions, but it's also reasonably priced and 2-sided, so there's less waste in getting a print right. I haven't tried printing color on it though.

I still haven't found a glossy paper I like, sounds like I need to try the Canson Baryta.

axs810
15-Mar-2015, 23:56
Canson Platine works well for B&W prints IMHO .




I love Canson Platine Fiber Rag, get a few sample packs from different companies and play around.


+1 Canson Platine

Dan Quan
19-Mar-2015, 13:35
Hi everyone. I apologize for not getting back to you all. This thread got old with no replies after February and I stopped checking up on it. I will read through and respond as needed. Again, I do apologize for this.

Dan Quan
19-Mar-2015, 13:56
OP, you haven't given us enough info. What kind of prints do you want to make?

For me, I would never consider printing on a luster paper. I don't like it at all. Other people absolutely love it and wouldn't print on anything else.

I like a "clean" look, where everything is sharp, but others like a warmer, more natural look. They don't mind some texture. A lot of it has to do with the aesthetics you have in mind.

That said, I have two papers I like are Hahnemuhle Photo Rag 308 and Kozo. The Kozo is a Japanese paper made from mulberry bushes, washed thoroughly in a process that's thousands of years old. The right weight of this is translucent and prints can be luminescent, when you get it just right... It's my latest passion...

Lenny
Hi Lenny, I am truly sorry I did not get back to you and y'all earlier, I do apologize.

I have a sheet of Epson Velvet Fine Art sitting on my coffee table and I really like that I can walk around the room and still see the printed image clearly. It seems to maintain it's depth independent of environment and incidental lighting that obfuscates my luster prints.

I LIKE THAT!

I am working to start using a P67 and Ilford Pan F + with Tessars, Ronars and Heliars (oh my!) as well as old bino optics and whatever else sparks my fancy. This will be used in beauty and still life images primarily. I am intrigued by the idea of "translucent". Are you are referring to the "Kozo White Thin" or perhaps something else? Also, how do you encourage or amplify this translucent appearance?

I am looking for a paper which couples well with anti or non reflective glass and has depth and clarity. Perhaps more than one paper depending on subject matter.

Lenny Eiger
20-Mar-2015, 11:16
I am working to start using a P67 and Ilford Pan F + with Tessars, Ronars and Heliars (oh my!) as well as old bino optics and whatever else sparks my fancy. This will be used in beauty and still life images primarily. I am intrigued by the idea of "translucent". Are you are referring to the "Kozo White Thin" or perhaps something else? Also, how do you encourage or amplify this translucent appearance?

I am looking for a paper which couples well with anti or non reflective glass and has depth and clarity. Perhaps more than one paper depending on subject matter.

I succeeded by choosing the best paper I could find and sticking with it. The approach allowed me to learn how the paper worked, and its nuances, a lot quicker. It costs more than the approach of using a cheap paper and then switching, but you might never get to the goal of being able to print really well, or learning what controls the luminescent quality.

Yes, that paper I spoke about is the Kozo white thin, 70 gm. I think I know what creates luminance, but I'm not sure I can verbalize it just yet. It's sort of how the dark and light tones match up against each other...

Have fun,

Lenny

Darin Boville
20-Mar-2015, 11:28
Speaking of...Is it me or do inkjet prints vary enormously in apparent luminance and contrast not just in amount of light but in direction and diffusion and color. When I print an image I look at it in my office and even there there is dramatic variation just if I hold it a little bit left or right, or tilted. Move it around even more variation. Walk around the house and it looks like completely different prints.

I don't remember silver prints being quite as touchy in this regard.

Makes you wonder how these could ever be displayed correctly.

Or does this vary by inkjet paper? (Edit: Or is this a Piezography thing?)

--Darin

djdister
20-Mar-2015, 14:40
Darin,
I think it's an inkjet paper thing. For example, I've tried out many more brands and surfaces of inkjet paper than I ever did with conventional silver photo paper. With all of the varieties of inkjet paper out there, I think there is more variability in optimum viewing angles (and don't forget adding differing inksets and printers into the equation).

Lenny Eiger
20-Mar-2015, 16:55
Speaking of...Is it me or do inkjet prints vary enormously in apparent luminance and contrast not just in amount of light but in direction and diffusion and color. When I print an image I look at it in my office and even there there is dramatic variation just if I hold it a little bit left or right, or tilted. Move it around even more variation. Walk around the house and it looks like completely different prints.

I don't remember silver prints being quite as touchy in this regard.

Makes you wonder how these could ever be displayed correctly.

Or does this vary by inkjet paper? (Edit: Or is this a Piezography thing?)

--Darin

This is a photography thing. It has nothing to do with inkjet. Point a darkroom print at the right angle and you get all sorts of glare in your eyes, you can't see the print at all.

Every type of print whether it be on gloppy darkroom stuff or alt process or inkjet has different characteristics. If it doesn't change a bit based on the light, the color temperature the angle of incidence/reflectance, then you aren't looking closely enough...

There was a problem a long time ago with something called bronzing, but its long gone....

Darkroom prints can be very nice, I don't want to take anything away from them. However,I have seen absolutely exquisite prints made by all sorts of alt process, and inkjet as well. If you haven't been blown away by a print not made in a darkroom, find someone who can really print and visit them...

Lenny

Darin Boville
21-Mar-2015, 07:20
Darkroom prints can be very nice, I don't want to take anything away from them. However,I have seen absolutely exquisite prints made by all sorts of alt process, and inkjet as well. If you haven't been blown away by a print not made in a darkroom, find someone who can really print and visit them...

Lenny

Don't get me wrong. I print on inkjets now and see little reason to consider darkroom prints, aside from some sort of speciality need. But I sure don't recall so much variation. Silver prints varied a lot but inkjets are just crazy, it seems. Or maybe I'm just getting older and pickier? I'll need to do a side-by-side comparison, obviously...

--Darin

Dan Quan
21-Mar-2015, 08:33
Don't get me wrong. I print on inkjets now and see little reason to consider darkroom prints, aside from some sort of speciality need. But I sure don't recall so much variation. Silver prints varied a lot but inkjets are just crazy, it seems. Or maybe I'm just getting older and pickier? I'll need to do a side-by-side comparison, obviously...

--Darin

I'd sure like to see what you are seeing because It seems like I am getting pretty good and consistent results. As an old habit I do buy my paper in batches and the quality seems pretty good, maybe I'm just not as discerning.

Lenny Eiger
21-Mar-2015, 10:54
Silver prints varied a lot but inkjets are just crazy, it seems.--Darin

When I printed exclusively in platinum I noticed how much different the print looked as it was given differing amounts of light. I learned to love it. It has to do with how much the image sits on the paper vs in the paper, and the qualities of a matte surface. When you get it right this type of paper (in alt process or inkjet) offers a rich and velvety look that you just can't get with normal silver paper. (At least not since they made that velvety paper in the 30's.)

Lenny

bob carnie
21-Mar-2015, 14:30
Give Art 300 a try sometimes , you will be very surprised


When I printed exclusively in platinum I noticed how much different the print looked as it was given differing amounts of light. I learned to love it. It has to do with how much the image sits on the paper vs in the paper, and the qualities of a matte surface. When you get it right this type of paper (in alt process or inkjet) offers a rich and velvety look that you just can't get with normal silver paper. (At least not since they made that velvety paper in the 30's.)

Lenny

Lenny Eiger
21-Mar-2015, 14:48
Give Art 300 a try sometimes , you will be very surprised

Bob,

I'm sure you have great results with it. Personally, I'm just not interested in anything with an emulsion these days. I love the feel of a great paper.

Lenny

bob carnie
21-Mar-2015, 14:51
We are in the middle of a 30 print show from Iphone capture .. tri colour gum over pd.. I love this.

I have found Museum Etching ink on paper- pt pd on arche platine and the new Art 300 silver can all hang together quite nicely.

evadennis
25-May-2015, 02:25
Epson Exhibition Fiber has the blackest blacks, the most brilliant whites, the sharpest images, the largest color gamut and the highest color saturation of any paper on the market. It has the highest Dmax of any paper I have tried, as well as the brightest and whitest base I have ever seen in a fiber-based paper. Prints on this paper are sharper than any other paper I have tried. The color gamut with Epson K3 inks exceeds even the Adobe RGB working color space.

Lenny Eiger
26-May-2015, 10:51
Epson Exhibition Fiber has the blackest blacks, the most brilliant whites, the sharpest images, the largest color gamut and the highest color saturation of any paper on the market. It has the highest Dmax of any paper I have tried, as well as the brightest and whitest base I have ever seen in a fiber-based paper. Prints on this paper are sharper than any other paper I have tried. The color gamut with Epson K3 inks exceeds even the Adobe RGB working color space.

It sounds like you are making a commercial for Epson. Many of these qualities have all to do with the paper profiling. While this latest iteration is better than it has been I wouldn't imagine the Epson paper is the best up against a Hahnemuhle, Crane or Canson. You can also be sure that Epson didn't make the paper, they aren't a paper company. They don't actually make any of their products, they do a little R&D but they are basically a marketing concern.

I wouldn't buy Epson paper (or ink) if I didn't have to. The way the company behaves in the marketplace is awful, to be kind. I tend to vote with my dollars when possible. I do feel the need to buy their printers for what I am after, but I don't have to use their consumables.

Sal Santamaura
26-May-2015, 12:18
I...Epson...I do feel the need to buy their printers for what I am after...Do I recall incorrectly that you previously posted your shop had become an "Epson-free zone?" If it was, what changed and what are you after that requires Epson printers to achieve? Thanks in advance.

Bruce Schultz
26-May-2015, 13:46
I've never tried anything but Ilford Gold Fibre Silk, and I like it, but could be persuaded to use another. Is there a reason no one else mentioned it?

Peter De Smidt
26-May-2015, 13:51
Head strikes? That's what I got when I tried IGFS. Otherwise, it's very nice. Maybe it was just a bad match with my printer. Epson Exhibition Fiber does give high impact results, but it has a lot of optical brighteners, which means bluish highlights. Even worse, those brighteners will fade.

Lenny Eiger
26-May-2015, 13:52
Do I recall incorrectly that you previously posted your shop had become an "Epson-free zone?" If it was, what changed and what are you after that requires Epson printers to achieve? Thanks in advance.

I did. Here's what happened. I was using Roland's, they are now up for sale, both of them. They were excellent, well-built, easily maintainable, terrific machines, etc.

They were originally designed to do 6 color, and to do this fast, by having two sets of six channels (yes, 12 channels) so that the device could print twice as fast. StudioPrint figured out that they could make an incredible inset by combining all 12 in one print "environment" that had 8 colors (adding orange and green) and 4 Cone blacks, smoothing things out tremendously and making the color more accurate. All good.

Except that it was too good. Epson got upset, and demanded that Roland get out of the fine art market. They were relegated to banners and signs, they could have that market, but stay out of fine art.... This wasn't a request... its serious. Further, they told StudioPrint that if they persisted in allowing people to use all 12 channels, that they wouldn't be given the codes for the new printers, and they would be forced out of business as well.

My Roland's are 1440 by 1440m, which is plenty fine for doing what I am doing, and for anything that goes on paper. However, I want to do enlarged negatives, print in platinum, etc., and I need a smaller dot size, as in the 2880x2880 setting. As it stands, almost no one is asking me to print in color for them so there is no reason to keep the printer filled up with ink and I am going to let that go...

I'll get a new 9x00 as soon as I sell the Roland's and stop doing color altogether... I expect to run it with QTR and my own blend of Cone inks...

Does that answer your question?

Lenny

Sal Santamaura
26-May-2015, 14:56
...Does that answer your question?...Sure does. Thanks again.

djdister
26-May-2015, 16:52
Head strikes? That's what I got when I tried IGFS. Otherwise, it's very nice. Maybe it was just a bad match with my printer. Epson Exhibition Fiber does give high impact results, but it has a lot of optical brighteners, which means bluish highlights. Even worse, those brighteners will fade.

How about Gold Mono Silk? Its a great paper too, and I have not had any head strike problems with either Gold Fiber/Mono Silk (Epson 3880).

Iluvmyviewcam
26-May-2015, 18:01
I have done a lot of printing on my 3880 and I prefer Canson's Baryta paper for my black and white. It's as close to silver gelatin photographic paper as I have had the pleasure of using. Epson Exhibition is good and some of Hahnemuhle offerings are excellent but for me the Canson's does me good.

About the same as you, but I lean to Fine Art Baryta for the tough surface. It is not my fav finish though, just tough.

bob carnie
27-May-2015, 06:08
I was getting major head strikes on Hannamuhle silk bartya, it was frustrating as only on this paper... The curl is massive as the roll ages and I was giving up hope.

Basically I complained enough to my distributer.. He then spoke to Hannamuhle and to their credit they sent me a profile and printer setup that was tailored made to my specific printer and inks.. No more head strikes...

I think basically what they must have done is change the suction settings other than that I am not sure what the hell they did but fingers crossed I am still
able to use a very good paper my clients like.



Head strikes? That's what I got when I tried IGFS. Otherwise, it's very nice. Maybe it was just a bad match with my printer. Epson Exhibition Fiber does give high impact results, but it has a lot of optical brighteners, which means bluish highlights. Even worse, those brighteners will fade.

Michael Mutmansky
20-Jan-2016, 18:01
I know this is an older discussion, but I wanted to mention that Atlex.com has sample packs of paper that includes baryta papaer from several different manufacturers in the same pack, so if you are focused on that type of paper, you can get a few sheets of a bunch of different manufacturers with their sample packs.

One is called the Digital Darkroom pak:

http://www.atlex.com/digital-darkroom-photo-paper-sample-pack-12-sheets.html


and includes

Epson Exhibition Fiber Paper
Hahnemuhle FineArt Baryta 325
Simply Elegant Gold Fiber 310
Canson Infinity Baryta Photograhique
Moab Juniper Baryta
Innova FibaPrint White Ultrasmooth Gloss

another is called the BW samples pak

http://www.atlex.com/bw-samples-two-8-5x11-sheets-each-of-epson-exhibition-paper-hahnemuhle-fine-art-baryta-premierart-platinum-rag-ilford-galerie-gold-fibre-silk-baryta-harman-photo-baryta-gloss-fb-ai-warmtone-this-product-ships-from-il-warehouse.html

and includes
Epson Exhibition Fiber Paper 325gsm
Hahnemuhle Fine Art Baryta 325gsm
PremierArt Platinum Rag 285gsm
Simply Elegant Gold Fiber Silk 310gsm
Harman Warmtone Gloss Baryta 320gsm

Anyway, the samples may be a good way for people to see the weight, base color, and texture of a bunch of different options without spending a lot of cash on individual sample packs for all the different manufacturers.


---Michael

rjphil
21-Jan-2016, 06:39
Canson Platine for my personal work (primarily LF B/W). I also use a lot of the Canson Baryta for clients. It's much more resistant to handling scratches than the Harman Baryta.

Michael Rosenberg
22-Jan-2016, 12:20
I recently tried Palo Duro Soft Gloss Rag from Red River (http://www.redrivercatalog.com/browse/palo-duro-soft-gloss-rag.html) and was very impressed. The paper is OBA free, and the paper base is similar to Canson Baytra Photographique paper in base color. The surface is the closest I have seen to silver gelatin prints. There is still a gloss differential, but it seems to be a bit less than other papers. The paper is 310 gsm., and in a lot of sizes.

Mike

vinny
22-Jan-2016, 14:27
Canson Platine for my personal work (primarily LF B/W). I also use a lot of the Canson Baryta for clients. It's much more resistant to handling scratches than the Harman Baryta.
I haven't tried that many but I really like the look of b+w work on this paper. What I don't like it the ink coming off in the mounting process. I use Scotch PMA which requires pressure from a squeegee. Everything is fine until I get all done and notice missing specs which can be fixed with spotting brushes but that's one of the reasons I'm using this new fandangled technology in the first place! I've had to re-print color prints nearly every time I mount one because of this. Can't spot those.

Ari
22-Jan-2016, 14:48
I've been using Moab papers for a while, though I'm not a huge-volume printer.
Entrada Natural and Entrada Bright are excellent matte papers, then I tried their Exhibitioin Luster which is just as good, though not suited to every subject matter.
When I tried the Juniper Baryta, it was a game-changer for me, and I love the look of B&W photos printed on that paper; close enough to a B&W print from a wet darkroom, but different enough to be special in its own way.

mdm
24-Jan-2016, 18:01
I have recently measured up a 21 step wedge on Ilford Gold Fibre Gloss and was astonished by a deep black of log 2.186 or l 5.9, using K7 selenium and the IGFS-3800-Sel curve with 30000 gloss overprint. Gold Fibre Silk is my usual favourite with log 1.964 or 9.7

QTR-Linearize-Data version 2.7.5.0
File: C:\Users\David\Pictures\i1andlinearisations\IGFS-3800-Sel-IGFG_Se-out.txt
Step Dens Lab A B
0.00 0.034 97.02 -0.19 0.44 - a|b L +
5.00 0.078 93.28 0.26 1.99 - |a b L +
10.00 0.135 88.60 0.65 2.18 - | a b L +
15.00 0.208 82.89 0.88 2.16 - | a b L +
20.00 0.256 79.31 1.17 1.66 - | a b L +
25.00 0.300 76.11 1.34 1.51 - | ab L +
30.00 0.351 72.61 1.44 1.52 - | ab L +
35.00 0.411 68.64 1.41 1.64 - | ab L +
40.00 0.478 64.38 1.49 1.74 - | ab L +
45.00 0.533 61.08 1.62 1.93 - | ab +
50.00 0.599 57.26 1.68 2.13 - | L a b +
55.00 0.681 52.77 1.73 2.22 - |L a b +
60.00 0.765 48.49 1.77 2.35 - L| a b +
65.00 0.867 43.63 1.98 2.30 - L | a b +
70.00 0.955 39.72 2.11 2.31 - L | ab +
75.00 1.058 35.49 2.20 2.29 - L | ab +
80.00 1.164 31.47 2.29 2.31 - L | b +
85.00 1.270 27.75 2.31 2.39 - L | b +
90.00 1.365 24.69 2.39 2.39 - L | b +
95.00 1.545 19.43 2.30 2.40 - L | b +
100.00 2.186 5.89 0.93 1.63 - L | a b +

bob carnie
25-Jan-2016, 07:14
If I am reading this you are getting a bit of yellow red in the mid which makes sense for a selenium - step two would be highlight with density of 93.28

Can I ask you how are you reading the print wedge or with what device ?

I have recently measured up a 21 step wedge on Ilford Gold Fibre Gloss and was astonished by a deep black of log 2.186 or l 5.9, using K7 selenium and the IGFS-3800-Sel curve with 30000 gloss overprint. Gold Fibre Silk is my usual favourite with log 1.964 or 9.7

QTR-Linearize-Data version 2.7.5.0
File: C:\Users\David\Pictures\i1andlinearisations\IGFS-3800-Sel-IGFG_Se-out.txt
Step Dens Lab A B
0.00 0.034 97.02 -0.19 0.44 - a|b L +
5.00 0.078 93.28 0.26 1.99 - |a b L +
10.00 0.135 88.60 0.65 2.18 - | a b L +
15.00 0.208 82.89 0.88 2.16 - | a b L +
20.00 0.256 79.31 1.17 1.66 - | a b L +
25.00 0.300 76.11 1.34 1.51 - | ab L +
30.00 0.351 72.61 1.44 1.52 - | ab L +
35.00 0.411 68.64 1.41 1.64 - | ab L +
40.00 0.478 64.38 1.49 1.74 - | ab L +
45.00 0.533 61.08 1.62 1.93 - | ab +
50.00 0.599 57.26 1.68 2.13 - | L a b +
55.00 0.681 52.77 1.73 2.22 - |L a b +
60.00 0.765 48.49 1.77 2.35 - L| a b +
65.00 0.867 43.63 1.98 2.30 - L | a b +
70.00 0.955 39.72 2.11 2.31 - L | ab +
75.00 1.058 35.49 2.20 2.29 - L | ab +
80.00 1.164 31.47 2.29 2.31 - L | b +
85.00 1.270 27.75 2.31 2.39 - L | b +
90.00 1.365 24.69 2.39 2.39 - L | b +
95.00 1.545 19.43 2.30 2.40 - L | b +
100.00 2.186 5.89 0.93 1.63 - L | a b +

Jim Andrada
25-Jan-2016, 10:18
I've been using the Museo Silver Rag for quite a while, but lately more of the Canson Infinity. I just ordered a pack of the Moab Juniper - if Ari likes it it must be good, so I'll give it a try.

Teamdasher
10-Mar-2016, 19:35
I just spent an entire semester at SCAD printing on so many different types of papers that it's mind blowing. I would say that if you've not checked out MOABs matte finish papers they are excellent for creating depth and contrast. Their Lasal Photo Matte 235 is really nice. Breathing color also makes amazing inkjet papers, and I really like their vibrance luster as well as their vibrance matte. If your looking for a wow factor that's not matte but different from a glossy print I suggest either the Moab metallic or the breathing color metallic. Hahnemuhle also makes really excellent papers, and all three companies provide accurate .icc profiles. You can get a sample pack from each company with 2 sheets each of their papers from BHphoto.com for relatively cheap.