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ChriguK
1-Dec-2014, 14:11
Hello

I'm Chrigu from Switzerland (Chrigu is the swiss abreviation for Christian).

I'm totaly new to analog photography and got an old LF camera... now I've many questions about the camera it self, how it works and what is missing... it shouldn't becom a dust collecting thing - I really would like to use it and I'll gonna ask you many questions about every topic. My problem will be, that I have some troubles with the search, 'cause I don't know the exact english vocabulary... but I hope this will change soon. Thank you in advance for your patience :-)

Cheers
Chrigu

PS: Here you can see my camera - and my first questions: http://www.largeformatphotography.info/forum/showthread.php?118285-Need-some-Help-camera-lens-identification-and-instructions&p=1193262#post1193262

Armin Seeholzer
1-Dec-2014, 15:35
Sali Chrigu

Ich bin auch aus little Switzerland, aber leider in der Luzerner/Aargauer Ecke. Solche alten Kameras haben leider grosses Frust potential, weil sie meist für Glasplatten oder dergleichen die Halter haben und nicht für normalen Planfilm. Ich kann dir empfehlen auch im Deutschsprachigen Aphog Forum nachzufragen, oder auch im Grossformat Forum, da hat es einige die mit so alten Kameras noch zu Gange sind! Hier natürlich auch, aber hier kommt noch die Sprachbarriere dazu!

Herzlich Willkommen bei den Grossen, Armin

Genfer
1-Dec-2014, 15:36
Hi Chrigu,

Your camera looks very nice.
Unfortunately I don't have any ideas about LF cameras but I hope
that you can very soon use yours :-)

Best greets from Switzerland (Geneva)
Genfer

ChriguK
1-Dec-2014, 17:05
Hi

@ Armin:
Merci for für den Tip mit den deutschsprachigen Foren - die hatte ich bisher noch nicht gefunden. Werde ich in naher Zukunft mal reinschauen...
...und Luzern / Aargau ist ja nun keine Weltreise... :-) früher oder später wäre ein Treffen bestimmt interessant!

@ Genfer:
Thx, I like it too - and hope this doesn't change due to frustration ;-)
I doubt that I can use it very soon... there is too much still to learn, discover and probably buy... and there are too many other timeconsuming hobbys ;-)

greets - Chrigu

PS: In January I'll be in Kandersteg at the Bell Epoque week... but I don't think I'll be able to take photos with my new baby there yet...

John Kasaian
2-Dec-2014, 09:22
Welcome aboard!
Have you checked the bellows for leaks yet? There are plenty of remedies for any pin holes. You can check your film holders for light leaks with photo paper.

ChriguK
2-Dec-2014, 16:08
Hi John

Yes, I checkt the the bellow with a flashlight in a dark room > no light leaks :-)
The test for the film (glas plate holders) is a good tipp - thx!

cheers - Chrigu

Andrew O'Neill
5-Dec-2014, 09:24
Welcome, Chrigu!

John Kasaian
5-Dec-2014, 13:26
Ortho film is usually very slow--anywhere from iso 3 to iso 25, so using a lens cap for a shutter shouldn't be an issue. You'll be able to practice loading your film holders under a safe light (and if required, cut the Ortho down to size under the safe light) You'll also be able to develop your film under a safe light "under inspection" and diluted paper developers will enhance any mid tones so for starting out you'll need one less chemical (film developer) It would be an easy way to start using your camera if you find working in total darkness a bit intimidating. Once you're confident in the basics, move up to panchromatic film & developers.
So...jump right in!

ChriguK
6-Dec-2014, 16:19
Hi John

The tipp with the ortho film is great - I'll gona try it as soon as possible :)
To do the developping I'll try to get some helps from friens working at art-schools - I hope they have access to good equiped photo laboratories :-)
And after the my first steps I'll gona try to get everything I need to do it at home... up til now I only have a room, where I gona make my darkroom :-)

cheers - Chrigu

John Kasaian
6-Dec-2014, 19:14
Hi John

The tipp with the ortho film is great - I'll gona try it as soon as possible :)
To do the developping I'll try to get some helps from friens working at art-schools - I hope they have access to good equiped photo laboratories :-)
And after the my first steps I'll gona try to get everything I need to do it at home... up til now I only have a room, where I gona make my darkroom :-)

cheers - Chrigu

I darken a bathroom with a piece of cardboard over the window. A towel keeps light from creeping in under the door but I usually work at night after my family has gone to bed. so often no towel is needed.
For loading film holders you need counter space. enough to stack the film/plate holders, and room to stack your box of film, and enough space to open the holder and load it, flip it over and load the other side (if yours are DDS) and a place to stack the freshly loaded holders (this can be on a chair, or even in a box on the floor) For unloading and developing you'll need additional space for your trays, and timer (for developing panchro film) I find that a folding table provides extra counter space.
My current safelight, btw is a short string of red led Christmas lights.