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bill2424
14-Nov-2014, 07:55
I'm trying to find a lab that can make an 8x10 negative from a digital file. I can find a source for 4x5 negatives but not 8x10. I'm assuming that the quality from an 8x10 would be better but I have no experience to back that up when it comes to film recorders. Any advice would be helpful.

Thanks
Bill

Old-N-Feeble
14-Nov-2014, 09:31
Maybe you can stitch four 4x5 negs together... I'd use transparent nylon thread. :D

Vaughn
14-Nov-2014, 10:05
There is a place in Sacramento that does that. I do not have the name...perhaps someone else knows.

Peter Mounier
14-Nov-2014, 10:05
I've used this place for making 4x5 transparencies from digital files, and their service and quality has been great. I see that they make 8x10 negs form digital files too. I recommend them.
https://www.gammatech.com/html/recordingmed.shtml

vinny
14-Nov-2014, 10:52
Search film recording or LVT film output. I dunno if the place in Chicago still does it.

bill2424
14-Nov-2014, 11:16
Thank you I appreciate the help

jp
14-Nov-2014, 11:29
What are you going to use the 8x10 negative for? If it's for archives, the lvt recorder option is solid. If it's for contact prints, an inkjet printed digital negative overhead film will be good. If it's for silver enlargement, you might investigate the silver printing from digital file services.

Drew Wiley
14-Nov-2014, 11:55
8x10 film recorders are uncommon. You might try Jim Browning at Digital Mask or chromiraprints.com.

SergeiR
14-Nov-2014, 13:58
I know person who does platinum printing printing 8x10 negs on his Epson printer (2880 i think)

Randy Moe
14-Nov-2014, 15:21
I've used this place for making 4x5 transparencies from digital files, and their service and quality has been great. I see that they make 8x10 negs form digital files too. I recommend them.
https://www.gammatech.com/html/recordingmed.shtml

Gammatech sounds great. Could be used many ways.

Steve Nieslony
14-Nov-2014, 15:47
Try Cox B&W Lab in Sacramento. They have an LVT printer... http://www.coxblackandwhitelab.com/

Steve

djdister
14-Nov-2014, 15:50
I know person who does platinum printing printing 8x10 negs on his Epson printer (2880 i think)


What are you going to use the 8x10 negative for? If it's for archives, the lvt recorder option is solid. If it's for contact prints, an inkjet printed digital negative overhead film will be good. If it's for silver enlargement, you might investigate the silver printing from digital file services.

Absolutely. I know a number of folks who print out their 8x10 or larger negative on an Epson 3880 for platinum or other alternate printing methods. The OP has not specified what process he intends to use for the 8x10 negs.

Daniel Stone
15-Nov-2014, 21:39
IIRC, Ian Mazursky was offering 8x10 negatives as one of his services:

http://www.prepressexpress.com/pages/filmoutput/index.html

(he's also a member here, on the forum)

-Dan

8x10 user
15-Nov-2014, 21:48
I have a few LVT's but I'm not yet calibrated for 8x10 negs. Calibrating for negs is a little more difficult and most people do not know how to generate customs LUT's for the device.

What part of Wisconsin are your from Bill? I live near madison.

bill2424
16-Nov-2014, 19:20
I'm in Waukesha, I do get to Madison often

Bill

macolive
17-Nov-2014, 15:04
I have a few LVT's but I'm not yet calibrated for 8x10 negs. Calibrating for negs is a little more difficult and most people do not know how to generate customs LUT's for the device.

What part of Wisconsin are your from Bill? I live near madison.
I used to thi that it would be as simple as inverting the image on photoshop and then printing on to the transparency sheet...apparently, as you've said, it's a lot more difficult than that...I've read that you need to use color inks to print out a B&W neg. Is that true? Something particularly to do with the green tint?

vinny
17-Nov-2014, 15:29
I used to thi that it would be as simple as inverting the image on photoshop and then printing on to the transparency sheet...apparently, as you've said, it's a lot more difficult than that...I've read that you need to use color inks to print out a B&W neg. Is that true? Something particularly to do with the green tint?

Lvt's record a digital file onto film like tmx 100. There is no ink involved.

8x10 user
17-Nov-2014, 16:48
What type of color negative film do you prefer? I mostly use the LVTs for personal purposes right now but maybe we can work out a deal in exchange for the film and processing expenses involved in calibrating. The software comes with a basic lut which I can manually modify based on your results.

The super secret software that my dad uses to calibrate his MGI recorders is way better for custom LUT's but it only works for MGI (its better then the MGI's software as well). MGI recorders are of course the best for 35mm and medium format.

I actually became interested in large format many years ago while I was working with my Dad at his film output business.

richardman
17-Nov-2014, 16:58
apparently, as you've said, it's a lot more difficult than that...I've read that you need to use color inks to print out a B&W neg. Is that true? Something particularly to do with the green tint?

If you want to use the inkjet printed transparency for anything (contact alternative process etc.), then yes, you need to apply compensation curves as the transparency and inkjet ink do not act like real negatives, unlike what is being asked in the original post.

macolive
17-Nov-2014, 17:02
Lvt's record a digital file onto film like tmx 100. There is no ink involved. I see. I'm a bit behind on the curve :-) Thanks!

Oren Grad
21-Nov-2014, 16:27
Chicago Albumen Works has large LVT recorders:

http://albumenworks.com/about/equipment.html

But they specialize in archival work for institutions, and I'm sure their services won't be cheap.