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View Full Version : Another Civil War Reenactor Try



Brassai
9-Jul-2014, 21:45
Shot taken using Chamonix 045n, Efke 25. Lens was 6 inch Ross Petzval c.1845. I like the out of focus swirl and corner vignette, but the DoF is not good here. Lens is f2.8. Would some lens swing have helped here, or should I just shoot from an angle that gets everyone on one plane? I'm still learning this lens.

Kirk Gittings
9-Jul-2014, 21:54
Your subjects need to go out and do a few forced marches through the mud and heat with maybe 2 hours sleep in their dirty uniforms eating poor rations and drinking filthy water. :)

John Olsen
10-Jul-2014, 18:12
Your subjects need to go out and do a few forced marches through the mud and heat with maybe 2 hours sleep in their dirty uniforms eating poor rations and drinking filthy water. :)
Yes, way too clean and a little chubby too. We need an "Andersonville" re-enactment maybe. I've never figured out the lure of Civil War re-enactments.

goamules
10-Jul-2014, 18:44
Ha! I like your shot, you did a good job. Keep having fun with those old Ross's.

Heroique
10-Jul-2014, 18:50
A fun shot, but they look like soldiers under McClellan, certainly not Grant!

To liven things up, we need more reenactments of ambushes by Forrest.

Or raids by Mosby. ;^)

Bill_1856
10-Jul-2014, 19:34
Have you ever tried a Rapid Rectilinear?

Brassai
11-Jul-2014, 05:46
I do have a RR lens, but it's from the 1890s with wheel stop. I don't think RR lens was really available until nearly the end of the war, and that might have been mostly in Europe. I have been looking for something like a 6 in. RR lens from the 1860/1870s but am in no hurry. I mostly like pre-Civil War lenses or those from 1900 to 1925. My last lens purchase was an 8 in. Dagor in Compound, serial dates 1910.

Jmarmck
11-Jul-2014, 06:08
Uniforms are the wrong color....err.............tone! :p


Nice shot.

alanbutler57
11-Jul-2014, 06:14
Looks good! I use a V750 scanner with silverfast. The software has automatic tone control for various films, so I flip through them all to see what "tone" I like best for the final image. You might look at some slight toning on the final image. I'm jealous that you still have a stash of that film also!

jp
11-Jul-2014, 14:42
I've never figured out the lure of Civil War re-enactments.

People can be patriotic (or rebel) weekend warriors without risking their life or being deployed on the other side of the world for long periods.

It's bringing history to life too, like driving around in a model T, or doing SCA stuff, but a different era.

Using the civil war rifles is way more fun than normal contemporary rifles too (as long as you're not trying to be practical). The smoke and smell and extra work makes for quite an experience, even with no lead involved (such as for show)


My brother did re-enacting for a while and I think it's neat, but my time is limited and it's not very high on my list of mitty like things.

Tim Meisburger
11-Jul-2014, 15:43
I like the lack of contrast and the lighting, but still think the wide open look is historically inaccurate. During the War of Northern Aggression photographers were trying to get things as sharp as possible, and using petzvals in their sharp center not soft edges. Softness or lack of focus in period prints is usually associated with movement. Maybe you could try a neutral density filter to slow your exposure times to something like what they were using, and use a hat for a shutter.

Cool project! Keep it up (but I do agree with others that Yankees these days are a bit bigger than in the 1860s).

paulr
11-Jul-2014, 16:51
I'd think you'd want to re-enact authentic civil war photography, like the Matthew Brady images. Mud is great, but they should be face down in it. Maybe some cannon balls and other body parts to balance the composition.

Did anyone see Micahael Moore's TV Nation, when they got the civil war guys to reenact the Historic Battle of Hiroshima?

alanbutler57
11-Jul-2014, 19:07
People can be patriotic (or rebel) weekend warriors without risking their life or being deployed on the other side of the world for long periods.

It's bringing history to life too, like driving around in a model T, or doing SCA stuff, but a different era.

Using the civil war rifles is way more fun than normal contemporary rifles too (as long as you're not trying to be practical). The smoke and smell and extra work makes for quite an experience, even with no lead involved (such as for show)


My brother did re-enacting for a while and I think it's neat, but my time is limited and it's not very high on my list of mitty like things.

The appeal is more widespread than most would think (I think). As a relative late comer to large format, most the re-enactment photos I've posted on Flikr are digital, many heavily manipulated. And the biggest surprise? A fellow in England commented on some of the shots and let me know that they have a well established American Civil War re-enacting group. . . in the south of England!

We took the grand kids to a re-enactment a couple of years ago. My granddaughter had asked me before why I put pictures of people I didn't know on the refrigerator, so I saw a fellow I'd shot before and introduced myself, and her. I was duly impressed that this gentleman wearing heavy wool in the hot Texas spring was well into his sixties, two tours in Vietnam and carrying a huge flagpole and flag in the tall grass and mosquitoes. . . year after year. Here's a link to show the size of the flag he carries, he's the fellow in red Zoave pants (digital image unfortunately): https://www.flickr.com/photos/43210263@N04/8173672639

Kirk Gittings
11-Jul-2014, 22:51
I've never figured out the lure of Civil War re-enactments. I love history and the civil war is high on my list. A few years ago instead of pigging out on a turkey at Thanksgiving we flew out to Washington, rented a big cruiser and visited every civil war site we could get to in a week. It was the best Thanksgiving I had ever had-ate turkey at a TGI Fridays somewhere.

I would try a reinactment-might even like it but I have no time in an ongoing way for such activities.

Brassai
12-Jul-2014, 21:29
I got another chance today, on a small scale. I again used the Ross Petzval as I'm trying to learn this lens. I only had a couple of guys to work with, and I seated them at a table that was under a large white canvas. The light from it was like a giant softbox--perfect! I am using anywhere from 5 stops to 9 stops ND, trying for a 1s exposure. I think a couple were around 4s, even. I also used my small Darlot Petzval that has a slot. I made an f32 slot for it and shot it stopped down. I did make one screw up though, which I found out by accident. One of the sheets popped out of the holder as I was closing the dark slide. I could feel it. I simply retrieved it and took another shot. I got to looking at the sheet and realized it was FP4 instead of Efke 25! I had mistakenly loaded the 100 speed into at least one holder I had marked with an "E". I now need to check them all, I guess. Maybe I should start loading my holders in the light, so I can see what I'm doing.

Curt
13-Jul-2014, 01:22
"When I was a child, I spoke like a child, I thought like a child, I reasoned like a child. When I became a man, I gave up childish ways."

After Vietnam I felt no need to reenact war, any war.

Brassai
13-Jul-2014, 06:33
Why aren't you using wet plate for accuracy?

I've looked at wet plate several times, but it just has too many hurdles for me. For starters, I'm mostly a winter photographer and I'm not sure how practical it is to do something called "wet plate" when it's 10 below zero. The dry plate looks a little more practical for me and I might get into that at some point. This is my first few times trying the Civil War stuff. Mostly I do railroads, and also the steam thresing bees we have in the region. The Civil War re-enacting thing I got in by accident, sort of. I know a guy who's into it and he talked me into coming out and taking some shots. It's actually kind of a fun way to kill time until my favorite season returns--winter.