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Darin Boville
2-Mar-2014, 18:53
O.K., no love at the home theater forums, so I'll give it a shot here...

I'm looking for a large--55-inch or so--to display still images in my gallery. I want to be able to play a slideshow. I'm looking at 4k screens like this one: http://www.amazon.com/Seiki-Digital-SE50UY04-50-Inch-120Hz/dp/B00BXF7I9M. Also willing to go 1080 p if 4k won't work (new 4k's don't seem to be coming out until August or so...)

But am having trouble finding anyone displaying still images. I'm trying to answer the following questions:

1) Do the screens display the still image at 4k (if the file is large enough) or do they automatically downgrade the still image to 2k?

2) Do the screen shave an SD slot or other input capability?

3) Do the edges of the screen, where the screen is black, show unevenness?

Looking for the cheapest screen that will display great still images...its capabilities as as video screen are secondary.

--Darin

Randy Moe
2-Mar-2014, 19:14
All good questions I cannot answer.

I saw a low end 4K $1500 at Costco that came and went. It looked way better than any TV next to it.

I think this will be 4K year, they are coming fast.

I am sure California has many high end TV stores. Go to one with a usb drive and make them put your images up. I have yet to do it, we have http://www.abt.com which is our source. Check out what they are selling, they have a stellar rep in Chicago, nobody compares around here. Not a chain.

I am not buying another TV until I can find the right 4K for me.



O.K., no love at the home theater forums, so I'll give it a shot here...

I'm looking for a large--55-inch or so--to display still images in my gallery. I want to be able to play a slideshow. I'm looking at 4k screens like this one: http://www.amazon.com/Seiki-Digital-SE50UY04-50-Inch-120Hz/dp/B00BXF7I9M. Also willing to go 1080 p if 4k won't work (new 4k's don't seem to be coming out until August or so...)

But am having trouble finding anyone displaying still images. I'm trying to answer the following questions:

1) Do the screens display the still image at 4k (if the file is large enough) or do they automatically downgrade the still image to 2k?

2) Do the screen shave an SD slot or other input capability?

3) Do the edges of the screen, where the screen is black, show unevenness?

Looking for the cheapest screen that will display great still images...its capabilities as as video screen are secondary.

--Darin

Robert Skeoch
3-Mar-2014, 06:54
I use 4K to show stills all the time.
They show the picture in 4K and the quality is outstanding. Viewers are amazed at the colour and detail.
They don't have an SD slot but a USB slot so you can just plug in a jump drive. The slideshow software is part of the TV software so you don't have to add anything to make it work.
I haven't noticed any unevenness.
It's important that things that should be black are pure black... like when shooting on a black background you have to make the background pure black with a "zero" detail rating. If it's even at 4% which is un detectable on a computer screen it will look moulted on the 4K because of all the detail.

I've only used the Sony brand since they seem the best.

-Rob

Robert Skeoch
3-Mar-2014, 06:55
If you put your images on a jump drive just take it down to the Sony store. They'll be happy to show you how it looks.

-Rob

AtlantaTerry
3-Mar-2014, 13:28
Try this search:
https://www.google.com/webhp?hl=en&tab=mw#hl=en&q=4K+TV

AtlantaTerry
3-Mar-2014, 13:30
How about 39" 4K for $499?
Or 50" for $899?
Or 65" for $1,999?
http://www.amazon.com/Seiki-Digital-SE39UY04-39-Inch-Ultra/dp/B00DOPGO2G

Math
12-Mar-2014, 02:32
It's much more important that you have a good viewing angle for a screen in a gallery than having a high resolution. You can have 4k if you want, but right now there's no good IPS panels out there and if you're at slightly an angle it'll just look like shit.

Darin Boville
12-Mar-2014, 09:10
O.K., I bought the Seiko 50-inch. First one came in with the screen broken--they had apparently had trouble getting the screen frame on and just forced it on, breaking the screen. Then shipped it! Second one looks perfect.

The screen is fairly amazing. I have it set up so you are viewing it from just a few feet away. It looks good. Sharp, detailed, even up close. Viewing angle no problem. Just a big photograph on the wall. I see the future!

One problem (at least with this model) is that you have the normal picture controls on all the inputs *except* USB--which is, of course, where I'm loading my still pictures from. As it is the image is far too contrasty and bright. (Side note: Every visitor to the gallery so far has loved the bright, contrasty image.) I'll experiment with adjusting the file to make it lower contrast, etc. Need to find a standardized curve or color profile I can apply in bulk. Or maybe there is an alternative way to load pictures? Can't afford a Mac Pro for this application... :)

--Darin

Robert Skeoch
13-Mar-2014, 06:28
How would you sell that image a the gallery?
With the TV or just the file. It would be hard to get what it's worth if you just sell the file, compared to selling a 50" print.
What are your thoughts.

Darin Boville
13-Mar-2014, 11:02
The monitor will be used to show either works (like long sequences) that would be impossible to show in my space, or video works. In the case of long sequences (where I'm showing jpegs of the still images on the screen) I will have the real prints in the gallery, if there is a need. In the case of video, where the video itself is the artwork I, frankly, have no idea. That sort of thing only sells to museums, etc so if I have the opportunity for a sale of a video we'll work it out then.

A primary function of the monitor is to draw people's attention. Everyone born since the 1970s has had a tv or monitor screen as a major part of their lives--we're trained to look at it, to stare at it even. I think most people are very comfortable looking at images on a screen that they might buy in print form. For some reason non-professionals are easily able to make the jump from glowing screen to print, with all the attendant changes in color and contrast--or at least that's what I've found so far.

As for a 50-inch print, I'm sadly not set up for printing prints that large at the moment, mostly due to lack of storage space for the resulting prints.

--Darin