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cbk
5-Nov-2013, 14:48
I bought Tessar 400/4,5 but without the aperture.

I decided to make by myself ;)
CAD Drawings:

simulation:
http://czarnobialykwadrat.pl/blog/tessar400/apertures.jpg

for waterjet:
http://czarnobialykwadrat.pl/blog/tessar400/apertures-cut.jpg

after waterjet:
http://czarnobialykwadrat.pl/blog/tessar400/leafs.jpg

cbk
5-Nov-2013, 14:49
Next steps:

making pins:
http://czarnobialykwadrat.pl/blog/tessar400/pinlathe.jpg

leaf with pins:
http://czarnobialykwadrat.pl/blog/tessar400/leafandpin.jpg

done:
http://czarnobialykwadrat.pl/blog/tessar400/testraw.jpg

last thing to do is blacking the unit :)

vinny
5-Nov-2013, 15:09
Really nice. If u can't buy it, build it!

Bruce Schultz
5-Nov-2013, 15:10
Make some to sell.
I'd be interested.

Jody_S
5-Nov-2013, 17:36
How did you fasten the pins to the blades?

cbk
6-Nov-2013, 01:09
It costed less than the one you can buy.

Jac@stafford.net
6-Nov-2013, 07:00
Really nice. If u can't buy it, build it!

I can only say WOW!

BrianShaw
6-Nov-2013, 08:03
I'm very impressed.

Randy Moe
6-Nov-2013, 21:53
And now even I know how they work.

Great stuff!

Drew Bedo
7-Nov-2013, 18:06
Very niceŚwell done!

Can this be done with any of the 3-D printing methods?

cbk
7-Nov-2013, 21:56
I do not know if you can 3d print leafs, but as far as I know you can print the rings,

Jac@stafford.net
8-Nov-2013, 06:27
I know nothing of CAD, but if your format is one supported by emachineshop.com (http://www.emachineshop.com/), you might be able to sell or license it.

MadJake
8-Nov-2013, 12:30
That's fab. Soooo when are you going into production!

E. von Hoegh
8-Nov-2013, 14:16
How did you fasten the pins to the blades?

Pins are rivetted to the blades, by fitting the pins with the ends a bit proud of the blade there's enough metal to peen over the pin. Takes practice, unless you have experience and confidence an adhesive might be in order.

Jody_S
8-Nov-2013, 18:59
Pins are rivetted to the blades, by fitting the pins with the ends a bit proud of the blade there's enough metal to peen over the pin. Takes practice, unless you have experience and confidence an adhesive might be in order.

I've tried riveting a few (pointed punch, anvil, hammer), and I stopped because I spent too much time on my hands and knees in my shop looking for a pin that went flying across the room. I've never found an adhesive that would work either. Perhaps I should re-try with a plate on top of the anvil with a shallow hole drilled the diameter of the pin.

Randy
8-Nov-2013, 19:03
Amazing! I have a B&L 11X14C f/4.5 Tessar, which I believe is about 395mm. Is that your lens, or a different make?

Jac@stafford.net
8-Nov-2013, 19:24
I've tried riveting a few (pointed punch, anvil, hammer), and I stopped [...]

A pointed punch is simply the wrong tool. Concave punch head is what you need.

Jody_S
8-Nov-2013, 20:10
A pointed punch is simply the wrong tool. Concave punch head is what you need.

I thought the pins had an indent in the bottom that was meant to be punched to flare out the sides against the blade?

BetterSense
8-Nov-2013, 20:21
I always thought iris mechanisms were one of the coolest parts of photography.

cbk
9-Nov-2013, 02:37
Amazing! I have a B&L 11X14C f/4.5 Tessar, which I believe is about 395mm. Is that your lens, or a different make?
maybe it is, but at mine there is TESSAR 40cm/4,5 print.


Pins are rivetted to the blades, by fitting the pins with the ends a bit proud of the blade there's enough metal to peen over the pin. Takes practice, unless you have experience and confidence an adhesive might be in order.
Yes, they are rivetted

I thought about adhesive, but I left this idea very quickly, as there is too small aera for it on the pin. Besides, when I was younger I tried to repair the blade's pin by adhesive, and I know it will not work longer than few turns.


That's fab. Soooo when are you going into production!
If there are customers, I will really soon ;)
Anyone intereseted?

Robert Brazile
9-Nov-2013, 08:53
Anyone intereseted?

I certainly am.

Robert

goodfood
16-Nov-2013, 22:30
I'm interest, if it can hold the end of the lens and lock it. Now a day this item become less and less in market and the price is high.

Curt
17-Nov-2013, 02:05
If brass could be used then brazing the pins would be an option. Steel is another problem, each metal has it's challenges. The best thing about eMachine is multiple parts reduce the cost. It took just a little time to work with their 3D CAD but after that it's excellent. It looks like a nice Iris aperture. People should remember that someone made the first one of these way back. I'm glad to see that you've taken up the task again.

cbk
18-Nov-2013, 14:19
I'm interest, if it can hold the end of the lens and lock it. Now a day this item become less and less in market and the price is high.

iris clamp is a good idea ;)

gphoto
18-Nov-2013, 20:11
Holy buckets, I want your workshop!

E. von Hoegh
19-Nov-2013, 09:10
I thought the pins had an indent in the bottom that was meant to be punched to flare out the sides against the blade?

No. This is not blacksmithing. Read my post again. The pins, where they are turned down to go thorough the blades, are about .010"-.015" longer than the blade is thick The blade has a very slight bevel on the side to be rivetted. They are rivetted over with a hammer having a rounded face - not a ball peen hammer, more of a planishing shape. To give you an idea of the delicacy required, my small rivetting hammer is stamped "1/3 oz". You could get an old staking set, set the pin in a stump and use a slightly rounded punch as mentioned above.

jp
19-Nov-2013, 09:42
Cool project?

Do the pins even have to be attached to the blade? Could they go through the blades and be retained by fitting into holes on both sides? Just trying to think of ways to make it easier.

I had iris clamp once for a few days; came with a camera, but I sold it within minutes of posting it here.

cbk
19-Nov-2013, 11:03
if pins are not tightly attached there will not be any accuracy and probably it will block the mechanism if one of the pins moves or slide out.

E. von Hoegh
22-Nov-2013, 08:43
Cool project?

Do the pins even have to be attached to the blade? Could they go through the blades and be retained by fitting into holes on both sides? Just trying to think of ways to make it easier.

I had iris clamp once for a few days; came with a camera, but I sold it within minutes of posting it here.


They could, if the aperture mechanism was originally designed this way, with sockets for the pins on each side of the blades - but I wouldn't want to assemble one made this way, it would be a nightmare ;) Very often, attempts to make things "easier" do the opposite. The op was making aperture blades to replace those in an existing lens; he had the original design to work within - and it looks like he did a stellar job!

Steven Tribe
22-Nov-2013, 14:58
I think that making new universal iris clamps is a bit more complex than some people consider.
You have to have a mechanism for tensioning the leaves as well as a device for clamping these in position. The most common system is a gear system for the tensioning - which works around the circumference - and a frictional ring which is driven into the revolving ring for keeping it in position. There are a lot of parts requiring 3D work.

One project I can see as having some demand and not that costly, could be replacement iris leaves for the early synthetic American types. I have experience with the Unicum shutter irises which have the fragile leaves AND loose steel pins. The were not made in that many sizes ( 2 perhaps?) and I could certainly use a set which which would make a very nice casket set from Busch complete again.

Jac@stafford.net
22-Nov-2013, 16:11
To add to the thread - some large shutters have paper composite leaves in order to keep it light-weight so it can achieve 1/50th of a second.

Can light materials like that be 3D printed?

(Both me #5 shutters have lazy leaves. Bummer)

E. von Hoegh
23-Nov-2013, 08:20
To add to the thread - some large shutters have paper composite leaves in order to keep it light-weight so it can achieve 1/50th of a second.

Can light materials like that be 3D printed?

(Both me #5 shutters have lazy leaves. Bummer)

Maybe. I'd look into cutting them from carbon fiber, first. The time to get up to speed, plus the expense for equipment and software means that I will likely never mess with the emerging tecnology of 3-d printing (which is still in the 'crawling on the rug' stage anyway).
A few years ago I made a set of aperture blades for a very early Compound with steel shutter blades and (incredibly brittle) paperish composite aperture blades. To shape the blades and make them identical, I made a filing jig by turning a steel ring to match the internal and external radii of the blades. I then cut two segments from the ring and filed them to match the profile of the original blades. One segment was fitted with pins spaced to match the pin holes in the blades, the other segment has holes which the pins fit into. Both segments were hardened and left dead hard. I then cut blade blanks from steel shim stock, drilled the holes in a drilling jig, filed the blades to shape between the segments, rivetted in the pins I had made, and airbrushed them black.

cbk
26-Dec-2014, 14:32
I have finished all the lens:

blackening internal tube
127214

blackening the iris and rings and mounting into the lens barrel
127215

making and mounting aperture ring:
127216

and the finally the lens is like this:
127217

and it produces such pictures:
http://www.obiektywni.pl/upload/real/137/680739_315715.jpg

Jim Noel
26-Dec-2014, 21:52
Congratulations for a job very well done. I applaud your knowledge, skill and perseverance!
And, of course, I, along with most others, am envious.