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View Full Version : My new custom made 11x14 and 8x10 field camera



sestese
22-Jul-2013, 12:31
Hey guys, just want to share my new finished 11x14 camera, after 6 weekends of work and 250 dollars of material is in perfect working condition.
I got the bellows from ebay for 85 bucks and the rest from hardware store.
The camera folds and easy to carry with the handle, I can use from 165 mm, wide angle on 8x10 up to 800 mm. lens focusing at infinity.
I builded from scratch the 11x14 back and the 8x10 one was from an old B&J gray camera.
The focusing is done by moving the front standard on the monorail guide, The camera has front tilt, swing, vertical shift. The rear standard has tilt and swing.
I did some test with negative paper and works fine, now time to get some green X-ray film 11x14 for contact prints.
Sal

SergeiR
22-Jul-2013, 12:39
well done

Leigh
22-Jul-2013, 12:59
Very nice.

- Leigh

sestese
22-Jul-2013, 14:16
Thanks guys.

pierre506
22-Jul-2013, 16:37
Hopping to have such ability to build my ULF gear.
Well done,Sal.

Randy Moe
23-Jul-2013, 12:27
Very nicely done, can you supply more on your 11x14 back?

Perhaps closeups of the vital areas and methods?

I am working on a 14x17 back and need a few ideas.

sestese
23-Jul-2013, 16:06
9920999210
Hi Randy, here 2 images showing the back. As you can imagine is the most difficult thing to make.
I started taking measurement of my film holder, prepare the main base support, cut the opening for the size of the film, I then builded a frame the same size of the film holder 1 inch thick taking in consideration the light trap on the right side, after prepare it I double check my film holder will fit in place perfectly, I then builded a new frame around the first one higher that will level out with the film holder in place. For the Ground Glass I got a cheap 11x14 frame I then put frosted clear adhesive on the internal side, cut 2 corners for the vacuum effect, I add 3 extra wood pieces on the 3 sides to match the size of the film holder, now I have the GG inserted and is perfectly in the same spot of the film holder, I add a handle for easy pull. At the Hardware store I got 4 metal strips (2 for each side) to make stronger and fixed them with on the top of the main frame with a little loop at both ends, then 4 nails, 2 for each side that will insert in the loop. Is still a little rough construction, waiting for better steel strips, but works for me.
Hope this help, Sal

Randy Moe
23-Jul-2013, 16:24
Thanks Sal, every idea helps. I learned a bit from this site http://cdtp-photography.blogspot.com/2012/10/ultra-large-format-camera-new-camera.html

I wish these guys would follow up as they said they will. Pretty good info and execution.

Mine will use ideas from everywhere.

I like how you got yours done pretty quickly. Good work!

Thanks again!


9920999210
Hi Randy, here 2 images showing the back. As you can imagine is the most difficult thing to make.
I started taking measurement of my film holder, prepare the main base support, cut the opening for the size of the film, I then builded a frame the same size of the film holder 1 inch thick taking in consideration the light trap on the right side, after prepare it I double check my film holder will fit in place perfectly, I then builded a new frame around the first one higher that will level out with the film holder in place. For the Ground Glass I got a cheap 11x14 frame I then put frosted clear adhesive on the internal side, cut 2 corners for the vacuum effect, I add 3 extra wood pieces on the 3 sides to match the size of the film holder, now I have the GG inserted and is perfectly in the same spot of the film holder, I add a handle for easy pull. At the Hardware store I got 4 metal strips (2 for each side) to make stronger and fixed them with on the top of the main frame with a little loop at both ends, then 4 nails, 2 for each side that will insert in the loop. Is still a little rough construction, waiting for better steel strips, but works for me.
Hope this help, Sal

Michael Roberts
25-Jul-2013, 05:45
Looks great, Sal. Congrats.
Qs: how much does it weigh? What kind of wood did you use? How is the stability?

sestese
25-Jul-2013, 08:14
Hi Michael, the camera is very stable because of the "heavy duty" bellows from a process camera, I also made 3 different position fir the tripod holes on the bottom for more stability but I always use the one in the center and the camera is balanced very well with all different bellows extension, for the wood I used oak, is little heavy but stable with time.
The camera is around 25-26 Lb.
Sal

Jerry51
4-Jun-2015, 22:54
Hello, did you develop a set of plans for the construction?

axs810
5-Jun-2015, 02:48
Beautiful work!